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  #51  
Old 02-12-2020, 06:50 AM
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I don't know if people buy them because they're made in the US, but a US manufacturer dominates the electric vehicle market.
I was unaware Nissan was an American manufacturer...
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:24 AM
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I greatly prefer our local (and much less sweet) cereals like Weet-Bix (an Australian version of Shredded Wheat) or ProNutro. One of my kids, though, is all about the Coco Pops (that's be your Cocoa Krispies). But that's made locally.
Cripes, I'm sorry, but "ProNutro" sounds like the brand name of a medium-high quality dog food.
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Old 02-12-2020, 08:00 AM
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I was unaware Nissan was an American manufacturer...
They aren't of course, but they don't dominate that market, as I'm sure you know. As I understand it, their sales have been decreasing lately and they currently don't sell anywhere near a plurality of EVs. If you count total sales going back 10 years or whatever, they sold more vehicles than anyone else, or at least that was the case up until recently. Another manufacturer has or will soon exceed their sales total.

Last edited by dtilque; 02-12-2020 at 08:02 AM.
  #54  
Old 02-12-2020, 08:42 AM
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They aren't of course, but they don't dominate that market, as I'm sure you know.
No, I don't know. Since I apparently have no idea what you mean by "dominate", since you seem to think some American company does.
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Old 02-12-2020, 08:51 AM
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Cripes, I'm sorry, but "ProNutro" sounds like the brand name of a medium-high quality dog food.
Your loss. It's awesome stuff. Originally developed as a complete food to combat malnutrition.
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Old 02-12-2020, 09:15 AM
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No, I don't know. Since I apparently have no idea what you mean by "dominate", since you seem to think some American company does.
Sell more EVs than all its competitors combined in the past couple years. If that's not domination, I don't know what is.

Last edited by dtilque; 02-12-2020 at 09:20 AM.
  #57  
Old 02-12-2020, 09:16 AM
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From what I can tell, American EMD diesel electric engines are the favorite choice for countries without robust locomotive-manufacturing industries,
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:16 AM
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Those videos aren't as enlightening as you'd think. They both have several limited-edition and slightly off flavors of staples (Donut Cap'n Crunch, Fruit Loops with Marshmallows, Blueberry Pancake Cap'n Crunch) that Americans don't like either (otherwise they'd be around all the time) and a couple of regular cereals (Peanut Butter Cap'n Crunch and Reese's Peanut Butter Cereal) that Americans like well enough too that they're always on the shelves. The Irish people liked the same ones Americans like.

Not sure if the video was meant to be disingenuous or if they're just mis-informed.

But Irish people sure do have a fascination with peanut butter! I think I've read on the SDMB before that it's not really a thing outside of the US.
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:18 AM
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From what I can tell, American EMD diesel electric engines are the favorite choice for countries without robust locomotive-manufacturing industries,
My Ex works for EMD. Haven't talked to her in years but they used to get huge orders from all over the world. How the hell you ship 100 big ass locomotives to China is beyond me but apparently it can be done.
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:59 AM
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`

Sell more EVs than all its competitors combined in the past couple years. If that's not domination, I don't know what is.
A temporal blip. Domination would require at least a decade's worth of sustained sales lead.
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Old 02-12-2020, 11:02 AM
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I think I've read on the SDMB before that it's not really a thing outside of the US.
Naw, I think peanut butter is quite common in lots of places. Certainly is here.

What freaks us out is that thing you do, where you mix it with grape jam, though... *shudder*
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Old 02-12-2020, 12:25 PM
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`

Sell more EVs than all its competitors combined in the past couple years. If that's not domination, I don't know what is.
Actually Tesla's market share for pure electric vehicles was about 30% last year. China manufacturers more EVs than the US does.
https://www.jato.com/global-sales-of...92-in-h1-2019/
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Old 02-12-2020, 12:25 PM
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  #64  
Old 02-12-2020, 12:29 PM
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People are missing USA's largest export, at least of the past 3 years or so: Bullshit!
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Old 02-12-2020, 02:29 PM
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Naw, I think peanut butter is quite common in lots of places. Certainly is here...
Yeah, and things like ketchup, mayo, etc. There are local brands and many people prefer the more expensive American ones. Often enough, they are better, but I think people don't stop to wonder if they aren't made locally under license.
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Old 02-12-2020, 03:35 PM
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What do you all think about our breakfast cereals? Fun stuff like Lucky Charms and Fruit Loops, etc.
The version of Cheerios sold in the UK is sweetened (a light frosting I think), and tastes terrible if you're used to the standard US very unsweet version. After being burned by this on one UK trip (Cheerios being the go-to travel satisfaction for fussy toddlers), on the next trip we brought boxes from the US. Our UK relatives said "wow, we thought all American cereals were grossly sweet". I suppose anyone who buys Cheerios in the UK expects a sweetened experience from every US cereal or something.
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Old 02-12-2020, 04:01 PM
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Well, not the Chinese or the Russians. Europe makes a lot of their own fighter jets. Japan and India are gearing up to do the same.
I imagine the Russians and Chinese would love to get their hands on some USA aircraft.
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Old 02-12-2020, 04:28 PM
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Yeah, and things like ketchup, mayo, etc. There are local brands and many people prefer the more expensive American ones. Often enough, they are better, but I think people don't stop to wonder if they aren't made locally under license.
In the UK at least, a few Heinz products seem to have become staples- baked beans and salad cream are the two main ones I'm thinking of.

Interestingly enough, the beans are grown in the US and prepared/canned in the UK.
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Old 02-12-2020, 05:48 PM
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Cigarettes! Marlboro especially.
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Old 02-12-2020, 06:58 PM
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In the UK at least, a few Heinz products seem to have become staples- baked beans
You guys eat them for breakfast, I understand. I couldn't stand the smell in the morning. I usually add onion, bacon and brown sugar. Do y'all eat them straight out of the can, without adding anything?
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:17 PM
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Cigarettes! Marlboro especially.
And Camels and Luckies! Something to be proud of!
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:33 PM
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Cigarettes! Marlboro especially.
Which makes total sense when you think about it. Going back to colonial times tobacco was one of the main exports of the southern colonies. Having been making them for hundreds of years, it makes sense that American tobacco products would be considered high quality. And with smoking becoming less popular in the US, those companies have been relying more on exports than ever before.
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:38 PM
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You guys eat them for breakfast, I understand. I couldn't stand the smell in the morning. I usually add onion, bacon and brown sugar. Do y'all eat them straight out of the can, without adding anything?
You have to understand that UK "baked beans" aren't anything like US "baked beans."

UK beans are simply small white beans in a tomato sauce. Think pork & beans without the pork and a little more tomato-y. No onion, no molasses, no pork. They are required for a proper fry-up and I always have several cans of imported UK beans on hand for when I'm hardening arteries.
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:51 PM
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I've talked about this before. Spam is a delicacy in Korea and I believe in Okinawa also. Both because of the heavy U.S occupation forces then and now. I talked about in a thread about cheese in ramen, that American Cheese, the processed kind is the preferred choice. Here's a video of one of my favorite YouTuber's from Korea (don't worry, she speaks English) getting excited about cheese in a can, saying "It's really, really popular online."

I believe all Asian cultures have an obligatory gift giving custom, where when you travel anywhere, especially the U.S., you MUST bring back U.S. made goods. Not manufactured per say, but big items from Hawaii are the expected macadamia nuts, candies and cookies, as well as anything Made In Hawaii, but beef jerky, especially Jack Links is popular too.

Edit: If you're ever in Hawaii, you can 100% spot the tourists because they're the only ones that have matching print Aloha shirts and muumuus. Also, there's a store, 88 Tees that has really pricey vintage Levis and Aloha shirts that only the Asian tourists even look at.

Last edited by lingyi; 02-12-2020 at 10:54 PM.
  #75  
Old 02-12-2020, 11:06 PM
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Oh, another thing I see Asian tourists buying a lot of are chips and other American snack foods. Yes, they have their own versions, but it's not the same.

At my current workplace, of the people in the office brought back a bunch of things from Thailand and what got everyone excited? Thai ketchup! Go figure. I think there's a novelty about seeing something familiar, yet different from what you have back home.

As stated above, American liquors are prime buys. To see what's popular overseas, check out the Duty Free Shop when you're taking a trip. In Hawaii we have an entire store dedicated to Duty Free Items, but I have no idea of what they have, because you need a foreign passport to enter.

Last edited by lingyi; 02-12-2020 at 11:09 PM.
  #76  
Old 02-13-2020, 12:57 AM
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MADE IN AMERICA products that are popular worldwide?

Entertainment, mostly.

Hollywood Movies
American Porn
American Sitcoms. (example, the whole "Trump in Whitehouse" farce)
.
.
.
Weapons. America make some dang fine human-killing toys, although in practice they are too expensive and often passed over for other inferior but ***much*** cheaper systems.
.
.
.
Tourists. American tourists are predictably obnoxious, have more cash than makes sense, and exhibit less sense in the touristy knicknaks they will buy than any other nation. Even the chinese.

Last edited by MarvinKitFox; 02-13-2020 at 12:57 AM.
  #77  
Old 02-13-2020, 02:12 AM
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  #78  
Old 02-13-2020, 02:46 AM
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The general consensus in Asia (China especially) is that Wisconsin-grown ginseng is the finest in the world. When we visited my wife's relatives in H.K. a couple of years ago, we brought a few boxes as gifts.
I lived in Wausau for four years. It's in Marathon County, which grows something like 90% of U.S. ginseng. They have some sort of US-Chinese ginseng association there, which did not surprise me.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:01 AM
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You guys eat them for breakfast, I understand. I couldn't stand the smell in the morning. I usually add onion, bacon and brown sugar. Do y'all eat them straight out of the can, without adding anything?
FTR, I'm a born and bred Texan.

But... having spent time in the UK, they're typically eaten as part of the classic British breakfast, which is a lot like a big one here (eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns), and with beans and fried tomatoes added. AFAIK, they're just straight from the can and heated up.
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Old 02-13-2020, 12:03 PM
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In France, there is very few american products in food ( anti-GMO and anti-antibiotics movements),
in cars( too big and not enough fuel efficient),
in trucks ( German, swedish or French).
for appliances, German, French or China.
as for planes Boeing is about 50/50 with Airbus for big planes.

Essentially, american products that are popular (and more valued than the European equivalent) are entertainment: movies( especially action/superheroes/sci-fi) there is typically 2-3 american movies for each french in theaters,
TV shows(we cry when a serie is canceled after one or two seasons because the American audience was not enough)
TV games (the original idea is taken: Dancing with stars, weakest link,...)

and porn, obviously: the american fantasies are overwhelming.

As for vehicles, are Fenwicks american? they're everywhere you need some lifting.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:11 PM
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I have a cousin who imports stuff made in China and he claimed that the factories rate goods and based on that, they get sent to different destinations. According to him, the first-rate goods go to the US, second-rate goods go to Europe and third-rate goods stay in China (and may perhaps be sold in places like Africa or India; I can't remember what he said). No idea if this is true, but it might explain why someone would buy something in the US that was produced in China.
Europe has at least two distinct markets: the best, and the bargain. German has both, eastern Europe tends to go for the cheap, but things are changing slowly.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:18 PM
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You guys eat them for breakfast, I understand. I couldn't stand the smell in the morning. I usually add onion, bacon and brown sugar. Do y'all eat them straight out of the can, without adding anything?
Not all of us eat baked beans. I loathe them. I think of them as cheap fill 'em up canteen food. Never had the US version, which might make me change my mind, but I prefer to home-cook my beans.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:22 PM
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Yes, really


One odd contender for good quality: Kitchenaid. Mrs Ded thinks its wonderful.

Another surprise item: a lot of outdoor clothing and equipment. Of course, it may not actually be manufactured in the USA, but in the past I stocked up at REI.

Some people list spirits as an example of quality. But that is true of any country that has aspirations to make something better than firewater that makes you blind.

I suppose US software could be listed, but its popularity is more due to marketing and a monopoly situation. Hello Micro$oft.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:32 PM
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US things you won't find in Eurppe


Cars: too big, too thirsty, too ordinary. If I want cheap and nasty I'll buy a Lada (Russian). There is a very small cult following for Jeeps and muscle cars.
Trucks: you don't see them much outside the USA, Never in Europe.
Pickups: a few farmers buy them, but not huge land barges such as the Dodge Ram. Except for the occasional fanboy who thinks he is in Texas.
White goods: there are US brands here, but where are they actually made?
US beer: c'mon, are you joking? The big ones like Anheuser-Busch own several European breweries anyway.

Not sure about agricultural equipment. Some US stuff, certainly, but probably made locally and to suit smaller farms.

Food: lots of US fast food and snack food here, but usually reformuilated in each country to suit local tastes.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:04 PM
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Cigarettes! Marlboro especially.
That's what I came to say. In the early 1990's while I was in the US Army in Germany, lots of guys would get non-smokers ration cards and sell Marlboros to Germans. They had cigarette machines on street corners in those days, but they were German Marlboros (19 to a pack, not 20, for some reason). "Hergestellt en Deustchland" meant "Avoid" apparently. They did taste like shit though.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:11 PM
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Cars: too big, too thirsty, too ordinary. If I want cheap and nasty I'll buy a Lada (Russian)
Cars can be problematic because even American-made cars involve parts contents that are usually a minimum of 25% foreign parts...and with final assembly points in Mexico, Canada, China, etc...it's become hard to define "American" for cars.

Not to mention that American cars that are sold here are usually not sold in the European market. Cars sold here domestically are orders of magnitude nicer and more reliable in every way than any Russian made car.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:27 PM
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Not all of us eat baked beans. I loathe them. I think of them as cheap fill 'em up canteen food. Never had the US version, which might make me change my mind, but I prefer to home-cook my beans.
I doubt the US version would change your mind.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:39 PM
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Speaking of American cars, while they may not be big in Europe, supposedly Buick is very highly regarded in China. One of the explanations I've heard for this is that the Chinese consider it to be an iconic American car, and one that they believe is very prestigious in America (even though that hasn't actually been true for decades). I've heard the only reason GM keeps the Buick brand around is because they're very popular in China.
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Old 02-13-2020, 08:55 PM
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That's what I came to say. In the early 1990's while I was in the US Army in Germany, lots of guys would get non-smokers ration cards and sell Marlboros to Germans. They had cigarette machines on street corners in those days, but they were German Marlboros (19 to a pack, not 20, for some reason). "Hergestellt en Deustchland" meant "Avoid" apparently. They did taste like shit though.
Could you elaborate a little--I have no clue about military life in the 90s, so I can't see the link between a "non-smokers" ration card and having Marlboros to sell. It sounds like such a card wouldn't allow access to Marlboros to begin with.
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Old 02-13-2020, 09:09 PM
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Here in Saudi Arabia lots of food products are labeled "Made int he USA." There are not labels for "Made in Italy" and so on. I suppose it is a selling point.
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Old 02-13-2020, 09:18 PM
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Could you elaborate a little--I have no clue about military life in the 90s, so I can't see the link between a "non-smokers" ration card and having Marlboros to sell. It sounds like such a card wouldn't allow access to Marlboros to begin with.
I assume it means that smokers would ask for, and receive, non-smokers ration cards, get the cigarettes and then sell them.
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Old 02-13-2020, 09:38 PM
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I assume it means that smokers would ask for, and receive, non-smokers ration cards, get the cigarettes and then sell them.
Now it makes sense. They would ask for their non-smoking buddy’s ration card, presumably in exchange for something else.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:38 AM
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One data point - my last job had a ton of visitors from Asia. It was so common for them to ask to go to the Samsonite/American Tourister luggage store at the outlet mall and buy luggage, that it became a standard agenda item to take a trip there for each group of visitors.
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Old 02-14-2020, 03:21 PM
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That's what I came here to post.

Other acoustic guitar manufacturers would definitely include Taylor.

Also, National, Scheerhorn, and Beard, who specialize in resophonic (aka resonator) guitars.

Interestingly (to me anyway), the resonator guitar (often seen played lap-style in bluegrass bands and sometimes referred to as a Dobro) is the only of the five common instruments in bluegrass bands originating in the U.S. (the others being the guitar, fiddle, mandolin (Europe) and banjo (Africa)).
Resonator guitar, maybe, but “lap steel guitar” is usually credited as Hawaiian, circa 1890s, so arguably not American....
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Old 02-14-2020, 03:26 PM
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I find that the USA manufactures some incredible firearms. If someone offered me a "Made in the USA" Remington rifle, I'd gladly take it. One of the most accurate firearms I've ever shot. Mossberg rifles, also made in the USA, are excellent too.

While I'm thinking of firearms, you should know about what Canada has manufactured in that regard. Cooey rifles, from Cobourg, Ontario, are a Canadian treasure. Very reliable and very accurate, even with post-and-notch sights. They were also great for beginners; my first rifle was a Cooey Model 60. If I had the chance to buy another Cooey, I would take it.

Tobin Arms was another Canadian firearms manufacturer, located in Woodstock, Ontario. They made reliable and dependable shotguns, and while they haven't built a shotgun since at least 1930, their shotguns are still collectible, and in demand. Prices for a Tobin shotgun today can reach into the thousands, for well-maintained shotguns, though whether that's due to their relative rarity, or whether they (with regular maintenance) just kept working for years and still work today, I don't know.

What I do know is that I last held a Tobin double-barrel, side-by-side about ten years ago; and the stock and the barrel fit together easily, as designed; the break action worked as it undoubtedly had for decades; and the trigger pull was reasonable. No squeaking or rust flakes, in other words. This machine had been cared for and maintained over the years, and I have no doubt that it would work just as well in 2010 as the day it came out of the factory sometime in the 1920s.

Canadians can make awesome firearms if they want to. If I like Remingtons and Mossbergs because they are accurate and reliable and made in the USA, then I also like Cooeys and Tobins because they are accurate and reliable and made in Canada.
A moment of silence for the Ross rifle, manufactured for the Canadian army in WW I, very accurate, but with an unfortunate tendency for the bayonet to fall off, particularly problematic because the rifle also had a tendency to jam.

And in WW II, Canada manufactured the British Bren gun. See Ronnie the Bren Gun Girl, Canada’s real life version of Rosie the Riveter.
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Old 02-18-2020, 10:20 PM
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In the days before tobacco was universally despised and condemned, the American product would have been the example the OP is looking for. In postwar Germany, American smokes were like the gold standard on the black market.
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Old 02-19-2020, 01:14 AM
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These are not exactly consumer products, but pharmaceuticals and medical equipment are among the USA’s biggest exports.
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