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Old 02-08-2020, 09:53 AM
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Tabletop advertising


The local Mexican restaurant is getting new tables. There are 20 tables in the main dining area, and they all have advertising on them like this. The tables/advertising will remain in place for two and a half years, after which some will be moved to a smaller dining area.

Mrs. L.A., RN, BSN, Certified Foot Care Specialist, is thinking about buying a 2-inch by 4-inch space for her home foot care nursing service she started one year ago. She's just able to pay her bills, except for her deferred student loan. She could go back to home health care; but while she likes the work, she's had some bad bosses. She could go to nursing homes and other facilities; but while she would have more patients, she would only be paid about half of her (very reasonable) fee. She needs to get the word out that she's here. Neither one of us has experience in marketing. While her 'business model' is providing medical foot care to people for whom it's difficult to leave their homes, some of them do get out to eat from time to time. Their children and caregivers also go out to eat. If she can get four new patients that she sees every other month for a year, that will pay for the ad. Who knows? Maybe she'll get a bunch of new patients.

What do you think?
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:00 AM
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Do many other restaurants in your area have advertising on their tables? I'm in the mid west and I remember seeing such, but not for years.

Now that most folks have smart phones there's no need to read advertising or sugar packets. Facebook, email, SDMB. I'd rather do that in place of ketchup bottles.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:09 AM
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If they're just starting doing this, and it's not the norm in your area, the price for an ad is probably going to be relatively low. And it sounds like your wife is looking to expand her business, which kind of requires advertising. So the question isn't whether she should advertise, but only how. If this is an inexpensive form of advertising, then it might be a good option.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:09 AM
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Now that most folks have smart phones there's no need to read advertising or sugar packets. Facebook, email, SDMB. I'd rather do that in place of ketchup bottles.
I always wind up reading the table ads. I've never actually called any of the people but that's more to do with me not needing their services than anything else. I think those ads come across as the business being community-oriented and a bit old fashioned and stable, which isn't a bad thing in the "in-home foot care for home-bound patients" business.

But, without actually knowing the financials, it's hard to say. I don't think that the concept itself is a bad one.

Last edited by Jophiel; 02-08-2020 at 10:10 AM.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:10 AM
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Do many other restaurants in your area have advertising on their tables? I'm in the mid west and I remember seeing such, but not for years.

Now that most folks have smart phones there's no need to read advertising or sugar packets. Facebook, email, SDMB. I'd rather do that in place of ketchup bottles.
I don't know about 'many', but they're not unusual. Mrs. L.A.'s clientele are generally older; people who have trouble taking care of their own feet, and/or have medical conditions. While some people do pull out their phones, most people we see interact with one another. The tabletops are another thing for them to see, much like the decorations in the restaurants. If they have a phone, they might take a picture of an ad that interests them.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:12 AM
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That cheap advertising, IME, works well.
There's a bar nearby my store that does advertising on their place mats. Very similar to this.
Years ago we started putting ads on them as well. It was like $100 for 5000 of them*. As soon as we started doing it, a lot of people started coming in because they saw it. It certainly made a difference.
Then to change it up after running it for a while, we started having them print that our ad upside down or mirrored (hold the place mat up to a light and look through the back). Every time we made some little change like that, people would mention it in the store.

Give it a shot. As long as the price is reasonable, you don't have a whole lot to lose.


*They way it works there, is that when they're getting low, the person who makes them (who IIRC, drinks there) figures out who wants to put ads on the next run. Collects the money, makes the place mats and your ad 'runs' until they have more printed.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:15 AM
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I always wind up reading the table ads. I've never actually called any of the people but that's more to do with me not needing their services than anything else.
Even if you don't call them, someday when you do need that service and you go looking for a business that provides it, that name will stick out see it.

Quote:
I think those ads come across as the business being community-oriented
People really do like the 'shop local' thing. While it's hardly universal, a lot of people will go to a business specifically because it's not some huge chain.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:21 AM
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If this is an inexpensive form of advertising, then it might be a good option.
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But, without actually knowing the financials, it's hard to say. I don't think that the concept itself is a bad one.
I don't know the actual cost, but I think it's over $1,000 for the second-smallest option she wants. That's with the 20% discount if she makes two payments, as opposed to 12 monthly payments. The tabletops are not as crowded as some I've seen, so there will be some visibility; and the ads will remain in place for two and a half years, plus a 'bonus' period when the tables are moved to the other dining area.

Currently, she is distributing flyers to various places (care facilities, credit unions, wherever they'll let her put them), and she is getting referrals from people at the home health care service she used to work for.



.

Last edited by Johnny L.A.; 02-08-2020 at 10:22 AM.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:28 AM
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Even if you don't call them, someday when you do need that service and you go looking for a business that provides it, that name will stick out see it.
That's what I was thinking. People read ads. Even if they don't need what you're offering, they might need it later. We usually eat in the bar (yet), which doesn't have ad tables. Yesterday I saw an ad for a gun dealer (gunsmith?). I need to start selling off my 30-year collection, so next time we go to the restaurant I'll take a picture of his ad.

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People really do like the 'shop local' thing. While it's hardly universal, a lot of people will go to a business specifically because it's not some huge chain.
In-home health care is very local. There are several foot care nurses in Bellingham, but they don't seem to want to cover Blaine/Birch Bay/Lynden/Everson.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:32 AM
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Can you reserve ad space for a particular area of the tables? You don't want your message covered up by chips and salsa, not to mention Mexican food drips.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:38 AM
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Can you reserve ad space for a particular area of the tables? You don't want your message covered up by chips and salsa, not to mention Mexican food drips.
Space is first-bought, first had. So you can choose the space that isn't bought yet. The layout is not crowded. The wall end of the tables have the ad guy's ads (2). They are covered up by the condiments. The middle of the table has the restaurant's 'brand' (and a 'Like us on Facebook' with scannable tag under it). The bought ads are along the three sides of the tables, so they would not be where the chips and salsa are. In any case, it's been my experience that ad-reading ends when the food plates come out.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:52 AM
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This kind of advertising works best for an "everyone is a potential customer" type of business like a shoe store it seems to me that in home foot care is more of a specific target of customers. I think you'd be better off using google or facebook that will allow you to finely target who is seeing your ads. Obviously, there is some issue that the age group you need to target isn't the most likely to respond to web ads but from what I've read there are a ton of old people on facebook so that would probably be my first attempt.
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:32 AM
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How many new clients does she need to acquire to pay the cost of the ad?
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:46 AM
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How many new clients does she need to acquire to pay the cost of the ad?
Four, treated every other month.
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Old 02-08-2020, 01:11 PM
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Another place ads for local businesses show up is the back of (some) church bulletins. The nice thing with them is the ad goes home with the person. I have no idea about the logistics though.
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Old 02-08-2020, 02:26 PM
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Another place ads for local businesses show up is the back of (some) church bulletins. The nice thing with them is the ad goes home with the person. I have no idea about the logistics though.
My former church did this. No ads on the first couple pages which had the service. The rest of the bulletin was news and updates and had ads. They decided to do this to reduce the announcement time. Instead of someone from the reading club getting 5 minutes to speak, it went in the bulletin. That would also be the listing of volunteer opportunities, the worship schedule, and all the stuff that has made announcement time drag on forever. A win/win and restaurants would often place an ad for a discount with the bulletin.
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Old 02-08-2020, 02:50 PM
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Ad guy here. Go for it, but only if it's cheap. And I doubt you'll get immediate calls from this medium; this'll be more la case of "get placement in the back of people's minds." (Then when they see you mentioned on social media, they'll think "I recognize that name. They must know what they're doing.")
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Old 02-08-2020, 03:02 PM
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A win/win and restaurants would often place an ad for a discount with the bulletin.
Even better when they make it a coupon, ie "bring this bulletin in for $2.00 off, Sunday only". That way you're thinking about it during mass and since it 'expires' almost immediately, people go right from church to the restaurant.
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Old 02-08-2020, 03:02 PM
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This kind of advertising works best for an "everyone is a potential customer" type of business like a shoe store it seems to me that in home foot care is more of a specific target of customers. I think you'd be better off using google or facebook that will allow you to finely target who is seeing your ads. Obviously, there is some issue that the age group you need to target isn't the most likely to respond to web ads but from what I've read there are a ton of old people on facebook so that would probably be my first attempt.
This.

I definitely don't want to read or think about feet while I'm eating. I'm really squeamish about someone touching me with their feet. *Shivers just thinking about it*.

IMO, word of mouth and targeted marketing are the best ways to promote a small specialized business. Unless the work just isn't worth the effort for half her rate, better to get twice as many clients paying half the rate who could bring in more clients. Marketing is largely a numbers game.

In addition a 2"x4" ad is really tiny, barely larger than a business card. Would you notice a business card if it was left on the table?

Related to business cards, whatever happened to the flyer you were working on? Did you ever complete the project or is she still using the flyers she made? I mentioned this in that thread, professionalism in advertising, especially in something as personal as foot care is very important. Given a choice with an obviously homemade flyer vs one that looks professionally done, I'd go with the professional looking one even if the cost was higher.

Once you get a professional looking flyer (with the tips you were given in the other thread, you were close to a high quality product), you might want to look into direct mailing or getting on the back of store receipts. I just got a Val-Pak envelope and don't usually open them, but thought I'd check to see if there are any good coupons. One for car detailing caught my eye and I would have at least considered it if I didn't already make plans to take my car in for a check-up and detailing at my dealership. Again, I usually don't look at the back of store receipts, but the other day I happened to check and there were a couple of coupons that I clipped.

One of the key points the sharks on Shark Tank always make is that a successful businessperson is always hustling, not waiting for the customers to come to them. The shoe store has been mentioned, which I agree is a great tie-in. Manicure/pedicure salons and massage places could be another place to market. Also see if you can setup a table or small display at store. Doesn't have to foot related. Also, consider swap meets/flea markets. Again, the point is to get out the public and not just wait for them to come to you.
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Old 02-08-2020, 03:11 PM
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Even better when they make it a coupon, ie "bring this bulletin in for $2.00 off, Sunday only". That way you're thinking about it during mass and since it 'expires' almost immediately, people go right from church to the restaurant.
Yup, that’s exactly what they did and we were a wonderful target. Congregation with a lot of people under 40, large LGBT, and not many teetotallers. The cocktails started flowing, we knew how to tip, and we definitely didn’t tie up a table all afternoon playing bridge!
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Old 02-08-2020, 03:25 PM
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Related to business cards, whatever happened to the flyer you were working on? Did you ever complete the project or is she still using the flyers she made? I mentioned this in that thread, professionalism in advertising, especially in something as personal as foot care is very important. Given a choice with an obviously homemade flyer vs one that looks professionally done, I'd go with the professional looking one even if the cost was higher.
She's still using the text-on-pink ones she made. I think she thought I was trying to help too much.

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Old 02-08-2020, 04:03 PM
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I've been going back and forth from my home in the mountains to Denver for a few months to take care of my mother. Three days a week I'm in Denver now. Let's just say I'm a tad overbooked.

One of my favorite restaurants is luckily in-between her home (where I have set up camp), and where she is at a skilled nursing center. This restaurant gives me a moment of peace. Great food, and relaxing atmosphere.

And they have installed a fucking video screen advertising over the fucking mens urinals in the bathrooms.

I am the most relaxed guy you may ever meet, but for a moment, it almost wasn't on the wall anymore. Got close to my limit it did. I'm here to piss, not to buy your bullshit.

Put this crap on a restaurant table and I'll be gone before I order. ~ Johnny, maybe it will work, or maybe it won't. But I wouldn't be around long enough to even see the add.

That is my opinion of this type of advertising.
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Old 02-08-2020, 06:22 PM
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In addition a 2"x4" ad is really tiny, barely larger than a business card. Would you notice a business card if it was left on the table?
[...]
I just got a Val-Pak envelope and don't usually open them, but thought I'd check to see if there are any good coupons. One for car detailing caught my eye and I would have at least considered it if I didn't already make plans to take my car in for a check-up and detailing at my dealership.
I regularly throw away eight months worth of Valu-Pak envelopes unopened but almost always at least casually look at the ads on the table while waiting for my breakfast skillet or burger.
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Old 02-08-2020, 10:33 PM
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I don't know the actual cost, but I think it's over $1,000 for the second-smallest option she wants. That's with the 20% discount if she makes two payments, as opposed to 12 monthly payments.
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Ad guy here. Go for it, but only if it's cheap.
He gave the price; do you think that's cheap or expensive? I have no clue what a good price for an ad is.
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:20 AM
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imho … i'd either trash the table-tents or complain to mgmnt and refuse to be served. what next … people gonna' place ads on their front doors to their own residence? go figure.
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:39 AM
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Four, treated every other month.
I'd pass, that's too expensive.

Years ago a friend decided to advertise in a Welcome Wagon promotion given to people in the area who bought homes. If you bought a home, someone from the Chamber of Commerce would stop by and present you with a fruitbasket and a bunch of coupons from local participating businesses. Free car wash, free roof inspection, free restaurant meal, etc. He paid a fortune and in exchange there was a very valuable coupon for his business. He would lose money from anyone presenting the coupon, but he'd likely have a new customer for life. The coupon was on the order of "$50 off this $60 item".

He was a Welcome Wagon member for three years, then dropped out. There was never a single coupon presented to him, ever.
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:47 AM
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imho … i'd either trash the table-tents or complain to mgmnt and refuse to be served.
They're not table-tents, it's essentially like business cards laminated into the table top. While not "common", I've seen it in enough family style or small restaurants that it's not surprising or weird either. I've never seen someone throw a fit and refuse to eat over it but I guess it takes all kinds.
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:57 AM
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I definitely don't want to read or think about feet while I'm eating.

targeted marketing ...the best way to promote a small specialized business.
This was my first reaction , too.
You have a very niche business...it's a service that I was totally unaware exists.
But your clients presumably know about it, and don't need an advertisment to convince them.
You need the ad to convince them to buy from you, instead of someone else.

I'm guessing that you would be better off placing your ads, flyers, or whatever, among your target audience, not just a random place where 99% of the people who see it will ignore it, or be offended by it. A mexican restaurant is a place where people want to eat and chat with friends. They aren't thinking about diseased feet.
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Old 02-09-2020, 12:33 PM
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Seek out professional help to see what's needed instead of trying to do everything yourself, especially since she's resistant to your help, her refusal to use your flyer and sticking to hers is big problem in terms of marketing. Here's a link to SBA (Small Business Association), a government agency that has free or low-cost resources. In particular look for a local WBC (Women's Business Center).

Be prepared though as the answer may be that your wife's business just isn't a good idea. As others have stated, she's in a very niche market and she may have to pay her dues by going back to work for someone else so she try to can establish herself as an independent. As I said above, her's isn't the type of business that people will just come knocking for. She has to network and reach out to people directly.

I'm not sure if the nursing home allows this, but maybe she could become a preferred, established provider for outpatient work. That's part of networking. She has to go where the potential clients are and establish herself, even if that means several more years of working for someone else.
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Old 02-10-2020, 06:08 AM
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My former church did this. No ads on the first couple pages which had the service. The rest of the bulletin was news and updates and had ads. They decided to do this to reduce the announcement time.
I don't get what one had to do with the other. You could put announcements in the bulletin without ads, you could put ads in the bulletin without announcements, or you could do both.

But putting ads in the bulletin doesn't reduce the announcement time.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:05 AM
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I don't get what one had to do with the other. You could put announcements in the bulletin without ads, you could put ads in the bulletin without announcements, or you could do both.

But putting ads in the bulletin doesn't reduce the announcement time.
I assume that the bulletin used to entirely relate to the service and, during the service, they had spoken announcements before or after. Now, they put the announcements in the bulletin so people can go home earlier. The religious service part of the bulletin remains "clean" but the more secular half with the food drives and daycare reminders and bake sales has some local advertising in it as well.

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Old 02-10-2020, 09:39 AM
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I don't know the actual cost, but I think it's over $1,000 for the second-smallest option she wants.
If it's something new they're starting, perhaps negotiate a break in the cost, perhaps fifty percent. But honestly, what I wonder is whether an ad for foot care is going to turn off people who are there to eat. Do they really want to think about (or imagine) the foot issues that require one to hire a specialist nurse?
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:53 AM
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But honestly, what I wonder is whether an ad for foot care is going to turn off people who are there to eat. Do they really want to think about (or imagine) the foot issues that require one to hire a specialist nurse?
This is the third time someone has mentioned this and I find it sort of weird. I don't think about rotting leaves when I see business card-sized ads for gutter cleaning or expressing anal glands when I see ads for pet grooming. It's just (in my mind) "Oh, an ad for an in-home foot care specialist", not reason to start imagining all sorts of blighted feet.

In any event, that seems more like the restaurant's problem than her problem. If the thought of needing in-home foot care puts you off your nachos, you probably weren't in the target market anyway. I guess we should pity the gutter cleaning guy who won't get his ad read when you abruptly leave the table
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:56 AM
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I assume that the bulletin used to entirely relate to the service and, during the service, they had spoken announcements before or after. Now, they put the announcements in the bulletin so people can go home earlier. The religious service part of the bulletin remains "clean" but the more secular half with the food drives and daycare reminders and bake sales has some local advertising in it as well.
Exactly. In the Episcopal church, announcements are usually made after the peace and before communion. So, rather than the endless parade of people getting up to speak about the food drive, the homeless breakfast, the flower guild, etc, all that is now in print and the cost of printing a larger bulletin was subsidised by advertising.

But the actual service itself on the first couple of pages is kept without any advertising. That would be beyond tacky to see an ad for Nancy’s Pancake House in the middle of the Gospel reading!
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:22 PM
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I raised the concern over a foot care ad on a dining table, and the possibility of getting crank calls. Mrs. L.A. decided to advertise. I guess we'll know in a few months if it pays off. FWIW, it's $1,045 for a 4" x 2" ad, which they will design, for at least 28 months.
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Old 02-14-2020, 10:11 AM
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This is the third time someone has mentioned this and I find it sort of weird. I don't think about rotting leaves when I see business card-sized ads for gutter cleaning or expressing anal glands when I see ads for pet grooming. It's just (in my mind) "Oh, an ad for an in-home foot care specialist", not reason to start imagining all sorts of blighted feet.

In any event, that seems more like the restaurant's problem than her problem. If the thought of needing in-home foot care puts you off your nachos, you probably weren't in the target market anyway. I guess we should pity the gutter cleaning guy who won't get his ad read when you abruptly leave the table
For some, seeing something long and thin like worms or snakes while eating spaghetti will freak them out. Personally, I can see maggots on TV while eating rice and it doesn't bother me. But even the mention of something foot related while I'm eating or not turns my stomach. If I saw a picture of a foot (hopefully the company Johnny L.A.'s wife if using will be tasteful in their artwork) on my table, I'd definitely cover it or even walk out if my stomach churned.

Strangely, it's something that just happened on day and I have no memory of the trigger. When I was young, I used to love eating at Japanese restaurant in the mall. They had giant stylized koi (carp) painted on the walls and I actually liked it. Then one day, when I went there, looking at them, my stomach churned (it's churning right now just thinking about it), and I never went back to eat there again. Same thing happened at another favorite restaurant we used to go to. There was a giant undersea mural on the wall. I was thinking of eating fish, but looked a the mural and ordered a steak. We went back there a few more times, but I always made sure to face away from the mural.

Last edited by lingyi; 02-14-2020 at 10:12 AM.
  #37  
Old 02-14-2020, 10:50 AM
filmore is offline
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Make sure that her business is easily google-able. Her business should be one of the first listings if someone searches for "foot home care cityname". If people notice her ad, they may just remember the basics that someone is offering in-home foot care, but they may not remember much else. You want them to be able to find her business later. If she doesn't currently have a website, get it up and indexed by the search engines before the ad goes live.

Along those lines, a better use of the money could be to put it towards Google ad words. That's where you pay for positioning in google searches based on what search they do. So then when anyone searches for "in-home foot care cityname", google will put her ad in the results. That would get you customers from the whole city rather than just those who go to that one restaurant.
  #38  
Old 02-14-2020, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
If they're just starting doing this, and it's not the norm in your area, the price for an ad is probably going to be relatively low. And it sounds like your wife is looking to expand her business, which kind of requires advertising. So the question isn't whether she should advertise, but only how. If this is an inexpensive form of advertising, then it might be a good option.
The real trick as far as I can tell to marketing is accurately determining what your market segments are, and targeting them effectively.

So for home foot care, I'd imagine that your market segments are going to probably be in two main groups:
  • Elderly people- I suspect that's the primary market. I'd go so far as to point out that elderly women are probably a little more specific- they tend to be the caregivers.
  • Caregivers to the elderly- that's likely middle-aged women.

So with that in mind, where do you best advertise to middle-aged and elderly women? Is a small ad on the table at a Mexican restaurant a good choice for that in your community? In the Houston area, home-cooking/breakfast places (like this) would be a better choice for aiming at the elderly. Similarly, advertising on Tik-Tok would be a pretty poor choice for either market segment (but would be awesome for 15 year olds).

That's the real question, not whether or not people will be repulsed by a foot-care ad on a table.
  #39  
Old 02-14-2020, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by filmore View Post
Make sure that her business is easily google-able. Her business should be one of the first listings if someone searches for "foot home care cityname".
Substitue countyname for cityname, and that's how some of her patients found her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
  • Elderly people- I suspect that's the primary market. I'd go so far as to point out that elderly women are probably a little more specific- they tend to be the caregivers.
  • Caregivers to the elderly- that's likely middle-aged women.

...

That's the real question, not whether or not people will be repulsed by a foot-care ad on a table.
Elderly people are her primary market. Here's the catch: She wants patients who can't, or find it hard to, get out to see a podiatrist. Some of her patients do get out and about though. While potential patients may go out for Mexican food, I think the main audience would be their caregivers. Some of these are middle-aged women, but there are also sons and grandchildren. They are more likely to enjoy a night out. Up here, dining options are limited. There's the Mexican place, a pizza parlour, a Thai restaurant, a hot dog/sandwich stand, a diner, and an ice cream parlour. There are a couple of other options nearby (four miles away, where we live), and places in Lynden, Everson, and of course Bellingham. Given the dearth of restaurants, unless you go to the city, I think it's likely that there will be caregivers -- or eventual caregivers -- that will go out for Mexican food. It's a popular place.
  #40  
Old 02-14-2020, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
Elderly people are her primary market. Here's the catch: She wants patients who can't, or find it hard to, get out to see a podiatrist. Some of her patients do get out and about though. While potential patients may go out for Mexican food, I think the main audience would be their caregivers. Some of these are middle-aged women, but there are also sons and grandchildren. They are more likely to enjoy a night out. Up here, dining options are limited. There's the Mexican place, a pizza parlour, a Thai restaurant, a hot dog/sandwich stand, a diner, and an ice cream parlour. There are a couple of other options nearby (four miles away, where we live), and places in Lynden, Everson, and of course Bellingham. Given the dearth of restaurants, unless you go to the city, I think it's likely that there will be caregivers -- or eventual caregivers -- that will go out for Mexican food. It's a popular place.
Sounds like your advertising venues are pretty limited, and this would be as good as you could hope for.
  #41  
Old 02-14-2020, 09:23 PM
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Based on the OP's other post, where he did a really good job mocking up a full color flyer that was rejected by his wife, it seems she's got her own mindset for better or worse of how to do things. It's literally her business and hopefully things will work out for her.

As for marketing, as I've stated above, in this extremely niche personal business, there's nothing better than targeted advertising, especially word of mouth. If you have a caregiver, who would you want him/her to recommend, someone they've heard has a good reputation from other caregivers or someone whose name they saw while eating your dinner.
  #42  
Old 02-17-2020, 04:12 PM
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As I said, Mrs. L.A. opted to buy the advertising. I sent her the graphic I made last year (with a couple of modifications), and she sent it to the ad people. We understand that they will create a similar ad, using an image/images that we are sure are not copyrighted.

In the meantime, I've added Service Area information and an Impresium to her Facebook Page. I also added her email address. I didn't put it in when I first made the page for her, since she can be very particular about privacy. Her patient today said he'd found her on Google.
  #43  
Old 02-17-2020, 04:41 PM
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Make sure that the ad describes what kind of services she offers in a way that people will understand. If I saw "Foot Care Specialist", I would think it's someone who does massages and pedicures. I wouldn't be thinking medical services. I suspect that it's such a niche service that even the people who need it may not realize they need the service. She may need to describe the problems she treats so people will recognize that treatment is needed.
  #44  
Old 02-17-2020, 05:22 PM
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