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  #51  
Old 03-12-2019, 05:42 PM
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. . . Beyond the Ivy League there are at most a handful of other schools that are perceived as elite enough to impress someone just by having the diploma. Texas is not one of them. . . ..
Depends on the field of study. UT Austin is considered very prestigious in law and political circles. Univ of MI and Washington U (St Louis) are top med schools. And Univ of PA has the #1 ranked business school. It's not all about the Ivy League any more.

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  #52  
Old 03-12-2019, 05:43 PM
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Yeah, my first thought when I read the article was "UT must be loving this; they're being lumped in with the Ivy League and Stanford for the purposes of admissions bribery." That's a huge endorsement for them, considering that they're nowhere near Stanford/Ivy caliber.
I'm going to guess that it was a case of some very rich daddy who's a proud Texas alum, who desperately wanted his dumb-as-a-post kid to attend his alma mater, and learned of the test-fixers through a fellow rich daddy.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 03-12-2019 at 05:43 PM.
  #53  
Old 03-12-2019, 05:52 PM
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Although I knew it was a private school if someone told me they graduated USC I wouldn't be any more impressed than if they said UCLA. Well I would probably be impressed if they were a starter on the football team because there aren't many who could. Maybe its because I'm on the east coast.
In the Times World University Rankings, IIRC one of the three major university ranking sites:

UCLA is in the top 20 worldwide

UT Austin is in the top 50

USC is in the top 75 (and attending USC Film School has its own cachet)
  #54  
Old 03-12-2019, 05:54 PM
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I think that the people who have flipped have done so already.



None of them will see jail time. They will pay big fines that they can easily afford and probably start scholarship funds for underprivileged youth. The CEOs may lose their jobs and the actors will continue on having lost a bit of pride. They will make public statements about how they lost sight of things out of love for their children.
Actually, UT tennis coach Michael Center was arrested and jailed today.
https://www.kxan.com/news/local/aust...ers/1842478712

He's probably made bail by now. I don't know if he'll see prison time. But jail, he got. I pretty much guarantee he's gone from UT. The new administration will cut you off quite handily.
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Old 03-12-2019, 05:58 PM
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This is an old story. in the early 50s, my cousin got into Wharton because of a $10k donation to Penn (a lot of money in those days). AFAIK, he did graduate on his own. Another $10K got him into Penn Law. Then he became an ambulance chaser, ads on TV, the whole works, and became quite wealthy. Later he went to prison, although I never found out what for.

Now I know another case of a Wharton graduate who could not possibly have got in on his record.
  #56  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:06 PM
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Actually, UT tennis coach Michael Center was arrested and jailed today.
https://www.kxan.com/news/local/aust...ers/1842478712

He's probably made bail by now. I don't know if he'll see prison time. But jail, he got. I pretty much guarantee he's gone from UT. The new administration will cut you off quite handily.
I meant the parents. Sure some of the underlings might see some jail or prison time. Anyway, getting arrested and then making bail doesnít count. I was talking about after conviction.
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Old 03-12-2019, 06:18 PM
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It's not just about prestige. Schools lile UT and USC offer a fantastic, traditional college "experience". Great Greek life, amazing foitball games, night life, lots of fellow elites to go to Europe with. . . I think it's quite possible that mediocre children of the elite would want to go there simply for FUN, not because they think it will impress others or pay off in their professional life. It seems crazy to spend that kind of money for fun, but hey, people go to Disney World and thats probably a higher % of their assets than this is for a lot of those families.

Second, however prestigious UT may or may not be, it's fucking hard to get into, especially in Engineering or Business. I've personally taught 2 students who got into MIT and not UT and known plenty of others who got into highly selective schools you WOULD call prestigious but not UT. An SAT of 1500 and near perfect grades can EASILY earn a big ole "nope" from UT.
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Old 03-12-2019, 06:19 PM
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kids of alums get special help for free a lot of places. One thing they do for alum kids is if you are out of state then you get in based on the in state criteria which is easier.
  #59  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:21 PM
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USC is actually a private university*, and it looks like the tuition rate is the same for residents and non-residents.

* - I only learned this, myself, a few years ago; I'd always incorrectly assumed that it was a public university, like UCLA. USC was originally affiliated with the Methodist Church, and became independent in 1952.
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  #60  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:22 PM
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Depends on the field of study. UT Austin is considered very prestigious in law and political circles. Univ of MI and Washington U (St Louis) are top med schools. And Univ of PA has the #1 ranked business school. It's not all about the Ivy League any more.

mc
Perception is not reality.


Yes there are many schools that have prestige within a field. That doesn't mean a thing when it comes to general perceptions. On the other hand there are probably some with prestigious names that don't quite live up to the hype.

We are talking about the difference between "Great you got a degree" and "Wow you graduated from XXX." Within your chosen field you would expect the hiring manager to know the difference. That doesn't mean the general public will consider you to be a graduate from an elite school. I remember from when my brother went to Rutgers Engineering that they had one of the best ceramic engineering programs at least in the country. Unless you worked for Owens Corning you probably wouldn't know that.

At this point it doesn't appear that we are talking about gifted students trying to get into difficult programs at schools that happen to have a great reputation within a narrow field.
  #61  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:30 PM
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And Univ of PA has the #1 ranked business school. It's not all about the Ivy League any more.
Nitpick: If by Univ of PA you mean the University of Pennsylvania, it is a private, Ivy League School.

Your broader point, that many public universities are excellent educational institutions, and some rival the best private schools, is completely valid.
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Old 03-12-2019, 06:39 PM
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Someone paid half a million dollars to get their kids accepted into USC???!?

Slipping the interviewer $100 would've been plenty enough to get both teens into Penn State.
And get them into the ice cream program! I know there are other majors like advanced paper towel tube crafts, but you have to do more than show up to get icecream with them.
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  #63  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:42 PM
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Man...at what point, dollar-wise, do you say "Gee, I guess my kid is just not cut out for this school"?
There's a couple in my city who has sued the school district every year since their teenage daughter started kindergarten, because the district says she isn't qualified for the T&G program. Get a clue, folks (and don't bother with a college fund; just save up for the therapy bills).

I found out a while back that a mentally retarded HS classmate from a well-off family has a master's degree, and suspect this is how she got it. She certainly didn't belong in mainstream classes, let alone the college track, and am also puzzled as to how she managed to get AND KEEP a job as a high school art teacher. I remember that she got a 3 on her ACT (not 23, not 13, THREE) and teachers would give her sympathy C's and D's because they had to, I guess. In addition, since she was part of the ultra-mega-duper popularity crowd and I was not, when I was assigned to sit next to her, she would pat me on the head while speaking to me, usually using baby talk, until I asked her if she was a lesbian and told her to knock it off.

p.s. I know her behavior was because of my place in the pecking order, and not her mentation, because she didn't do it to other people.

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  #64  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:45 PM
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I see a distinction without much difference. In both cases, an unqualified kidís parents bought a qualified kidís spot.
The distinction is the victim. In this case the schools themselves are the victims. In the grand donation case, the schools are the beneficiary and there is no victim.

Thatís a pretty big difference.
  #65  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:47 PM
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I see a distinction without much difference. In both cases, an unqualified kidís parents bought a qualified kidís spot.
I think the difference is that one is fraud, and one is not.

Like, Harvard can accept who they want. They might claim to be a meritocracy, but they're obviously not, and if there's a tacit understanding that having a building with your name on it on the campus gives you a good chance to get in, whatever.

If I want to start up Walrus's Super Good College and admit people who donate enough money to build a dorm, why shouldn't I be able to. As long as I'm not discriminating based on protected classes, I should be able to (FWIW, Harvard is also doing that).

Colleges already charge rich people more than poor people. No reason they can't charge really rich people way more.

Fraudulent documents and bribing employees is a whole different thing.

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Apparently some of the kids literally didn't know. I can believe it. . .youth is moreidralistic than adults. I don't think revocation is fair in those cases.
Even the ones who knew I think should probably not have degrees revoked. Imagine you're 18 and your rich powerful parents pull strings to get you something you don't deserve. I think it's asking quite a lot to have the moral backbone to have stood up to them at the time. Certainly it would be virtuous, but I think revoking a degree that someone actually showed up to school for for four years is punishment greatly in excess of the crime.

Now, maybe the graft didn't end there and they also bribed teachers for passing grades. In which case, sure, throw 'em out. But the standard should be more than a lie on an admissions form.
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Old 03-12-2019, 06:48 PM
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zimaane, I wouldn't call that a nitpick. That would be a complete correction. I had no idea that UPenn was Ivy League. Being a U of IL alum and a long time employee of UCSD, I just assumed it was a public school.

Thanks for the info!

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Old 03-12-2019, 06:55 PM
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The distinction is the victim. In this case the schools themselves are the victims. In the grand donation case, the schools are the beneficiary and there is no victim.

Thatís a pretty big difference.
Plus in this case it's illegal. It's not a victimless crime, it's fraud. The schools were defrauded, we were all defrauded when taxes weren't paid on the bribe money, and eligible students didn't get the spots that undeserving students did.

Either the price of a new building was too high or the kids were too dumb but this is way worse than using legal means to buy an education even if those legal means are already morally reprehensible. This just adds illegality that has no justification on top of that.
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Old 03-12-2019, 06:58 PM
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Harvard has such a giant endowment , around $40 billion, they don't have to charge anyone to attend but they do since people will pay their way . That's one advantage you get when your school started up in 1636 , a long time for the money to add up. (and since someone will likely jump in here , I know the Harvard endowment is not just 1 big pile of money so it cannot all be used to fund students)

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Old 03-12-2019, 07:10 PM
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It doesn't have to be a prestigious school - most schools don't accept 100% of students - and a room temperature SAT score and a C average isn't going to get you in to much but bottom barrel schools.

There isn't Ivys and the rest of the world including community colleges. There are tons of schools with less than 50% admissions rates that are competitive schools to get into - and it sounds like some of these kids weren't even competitive at that level.
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Old 03-12-2019, 07:20 PM
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I meant the parents. Sure some of the underlings might see some jail or prison time. Anyway, getting arrested and then making bail doesnít count. I was talking about after conviction.
This guy disagrees with me though.

https://lawandcrime.com/high-profile...an-could-face/
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Old 03-12-2019, 07:28 PM
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So they paid $500,000 to get their kids into college? The older daughter didn't even want to go to school! I'm assuming with in-state tuition they would have paid far less to send their daughters to USC if they hadn't bribed.

Are they going to bribe employers to hire their children for work? I am quite baffled by this whole thing.
No wonder kids from wealthy families often have such serious issues with drugs, mental health, etc. - having to live up to expectations for things they aren't interested in.

As for bribing employers, IDK if that specifically was done at the hospital where I used to work, but we did hire a technician whose mother was a PA-C and his stepfather was a prominent member of the medical staff. We did know from the get-go that hiring him was NOT an option, and without going into details that could potentially lead to a HIPAA violation, let's just say that didn't end well, which didn't surprise anybody. This was during a period where we hired some real doozy technicians, none of whom lasted very long.

One of our pharmacists lived down the street from them, and she was pretty sure that the house was being used for drug dealing, due to all the short-term traffic in and out of the house, which of course could have (among other things) cost the parents their licenses. Plus, when the PA-C and her husband divorced, he got custody and to nobody's surprise, when they turned 14, they moved in with their mom and stepdad because there weren't any rules over there. (Yeah, I know it's often the other way around, but that's what happened in this family.)

I read an article a while back about the daughter of an extremely wealthy East Coast family who completely threw a wrench into her family's traditions by having a mind of her own and eschewing an Ivy League education for
SPOILER:
the police academy. Yep, she wanted to be a cop, and that's exactly what she did


More recently, I read an essay from the guy who wrote "Far From The Tree" about how such families handle children with mental and/or physical disabilities. In short, the kids are often "put away", and the staff often paid a lot of money to keep their mouths shut, which didn't surprise me.
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Old 03-12-2019, 07:33 PM
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It doesn't have to be a prestigious school - most schools don't accept 100% of students - and a room temperature SAT score and a C average isn't going to get you in to much but bottom barrel schools.

There isn't Ivys and the rest of the world including community colleges. There are tons of schools with less than 50% admissions rates that are competitive schools to get into - and it sounds like some of these kids weren't even competitive at that level.
I guess I'm trying to think like the rich entitled corrupt parents. I'm well aware that getting admitted to many schools is difficult. If I was going to be bribing with that kind of money I want a school with more cachet.

Growing up in the shadows of Rutgers I'm well aware of how difficult it is to get into some state schools. They are increasing out of state enrollment to make more money which makes it harder for residents to get in to their state university.
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Old 03-12-2019, 07:35 PM
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I wonder how dumb the kids really are. What if they'd been raised to value hard work, education, and studying? Maybe their parents wouldn't have felt the only way they could get into a decent college was with bribery. We'll never know now. Even if some of the kids have working brains, this doubt will always be there.

As a middle-aged student struggling to afford even a public state school, this all really pisses me off. Some of my younger classmates are brilliant and could've done so much with opportunities in these colleges. In the case of Lori Laughlin's daughter, she's just there to party. Ugh.
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Old 03-12-2019, 07:46 PM
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I read an article a while back about the daughter of an extremely wealthy East Coast family who completely threw a wrench into her family's traditions by having a mind of her own and eschewing an Ivy League education for
SPOILER:
the police academy. Yep, she wanted to be a cop, and that's exactly what she did
They're gonna call me sir they'll all stop picking on me
Well I'm a high school grad I'm over 5 foot 3
I'll get a badge and a gun and I'll join the P.D...


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Old 03-12-2019, 07:52 PM
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I'm not going to judge all of the children especially since some of them were apparently unaware. If my parent did this without my knowing I would never forgive them and I am speaking as somebody who really would have loved to get into Harvard/Princeton/Yale. If I found out that my parents bribed somebody to get me in I would never feel like I deserved to be there. One of the reasons I turned down Stanford (among many) was that I was a legacy and a faculty brat and I didn't want that hanging over my head. Some of these kids may have been smart and good workers and their parents just wanted to assure that they got into their school of choice. Then again, some as noted above are clearly idiots who are too stupid or lazy to deserve a spot.

It still amazes me that they could set up an "official" SAT testing center where the proctors were able to give the kids the correct answers or correct their tests for them and nobody was overseeing it.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:03 PM
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If nothing else, I'd love to see the degrees revoked for those students that made it all the way through.
That makes absolutely no sense at all. If the kid actually met the requirements of graduation, of course they get to keep their degree. That's what degrees are.

The people who committed crimes should be punished, but the kid did nothing wrong. And from their perspective, getting in isn't the part that matters. It's how you got out.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:04 PM
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I guess I'm trying to think like the rich entitled corrupt parents. I'm well aware that getting admitted to many schools is difficult. If I was going to be bribing with that kind of money I want a school with more cachet.

Growing up in the shadows of Rutgers I'm well aware of how difficult it is to get into some state schools. They are increasing out of state enrollment to make more money which makes it harder for residents to get in to their state university.
I hate to link to a video, but I can't put this ideal into words. This sorority recruitment video was roundly criticized (for good reason) but it shows what the "ideal" college experience is about for some people. If that's what you are looking for, I can see thinking USC would be a fabulous place to get it (not to say that USC isn't a good school, academically--it is. But if you did not give a shit about the academics and wanted 1) aesthetially gorgeous surroundings 2) lots of rich, beautiful people to hang out with 3) California weather, USC seem ideal.

Again, you're thinking of this as "people spend more money than I will ever have to get their kids into college--wouldn't they want the best?" This is more like "Daughter wants to go a school cuz it's cool but she can't get in, but if we spend a fraction of a percent of our net worth, someone will take care of it". I'm sure they didn't think they'd get arrested.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:07 PM
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It's not just about prestige. Schools lile UT and USC offer a fantastic, traditional college "experience". Great Greek life, amazing foitball games, night life, lots of fellow elites to go to Europe with. . . I think it's quite possible that mediocre children of the elite would want to go there simply for FUN, not because they think it will impress others or pay off in their professional life. It seems crazy to spend that kind of money for fun, but hey, people go to Disney World and thats probably a higher % of their assets than this is for a lot of those families.
I grew up in Des Moines. Drake University has long been that way for kids from wealthy families from Chicago who couldn't get into Harvard, etc. and I've heard the same thing about Creighton in Omaha.

Gee, I also wonder where a lot of the drug money in those cities comes from.......
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:11 PM
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Perception is not reality.


Yes there are many schools that have prestige within a field. That doesn't mean a thing when it comes to general perceptions. On the other hand there are probably some with prestigious names that don't quite live up to the hype.

We are talking about the difference between "Great you got a degree" and "Wow you graduated from XXX." Within your chosen field you would expect the hiring manager to know the difference. That doesn't mean the general public will consider you to be a graduate from an elite school. I remember from when my brother went to Rutgers Engineering that they had one of the best ceramic engineering programs at least in the country. Unless you worked for Owens Corning you probably wouldn't know that.

At this point it doesn't appear that we are talking about gifted students trying to get into difficult programs at schools that happen to have a great reputation within a narrow field.
There really aren't any "best" pharmacy schools, but there are definitely some "worst" ones. The best way to tell is if the program has opened within the past 10 years; far too many of these are nothing but diploma mills.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:13 PM
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And in case anyone is wondering, yes, William Macy was up to his neck in this.
Oh, man. You would think William H. Macy, of all people, would know better than to get involved in some kind of harebrained criminal scheme. Those never end well.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:21 PM
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That makes absolutely no sense at all. If the kid actually met the requirements of graduation, of course they get to keep their degree. That's what degrees are.

The people who committed crimes should be punished, but the kid did nothing wrong. And from their perspective, getting in isn't the part that matters. It's how you got out.
Some of the kids damn well did something wrong like posing for a picture as if they were on the crew team or allowing someone to take the SAT for them. I'd investigate if they actually did their coursework if possible.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:24 PM
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https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/...184117206.html

This is funny. A quote from Macy from several months ago complaining about how stressful it was when his daughter was applying for colleges.

Not a word from the celebs today. They are definitely huddled with their rep from one of the best PR firms and a lawyer or two figuring out how to spin this.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:25 PM
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The kids most definitely did something wrong. A number of them knew their test scores were faked, because they sat right there and watched somebody else fill in the right answers.

Kick them out, void their degrees, fine them millions - kids and parents alike. Then jail every coach/administrator/whatever for 20 years minimum. Scorched earth. Let Macy, Huffman and the rest of the parents enjoy prison food while their entire lives are confiscated. No prisoners, no quarter.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:33 PM
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Although I knew it was a private school if someone told me they graduated USC I wouldn't be any more impressed than if they said UCLA. Well I would probably be impressed if they were a starter on the football team because there aren't many who could. Maybe its because I'm on the east coast.
I think your impression of these various schools is out of date. UCLA is a top 20 school, ranked higher than USC in the linked list: https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges...l-universities

All of those schools listed earlier in this thread are elite and very difficult to get into.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:37 PM
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Manda JO, damn I thought of that same vid too when I read about Loughlin's daughter and her wanting the party experience rather than actual schooling.

I like the clever part of bribing coaches to declare the kids to be "athletes", which only confirms the already extant perception that the schools will admit whoever Coach says admit, regardless of objective qualifications. Though it suggests that the coaches have some sort of margin of people they can admit on say-so without consideration for whether the "student"-athlete will bring success to the team... I mean, if were a coach would I recruit totally useless posers, or someone who may not be able to tell the multiplication table from the coffee table but who with a year's training may destroy the opposition in the field/court? Style points for the staged/'shopped photos of the teens being athletic.

Compared to that paying someone to take the SAT for your teenager looks just so pedestrian.

Loughlin's daughter not only was there just to party, she monetized her experience -- on move-in week she did Sponsored Instagram shares advertising how she furnished her dorm room through Amazon Prime. So at least she's got that much business sense.

Last edited by JRDelirious; 03-12-2019 at 08:40 PM.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:39 PM
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I'm sure Macy is just as guilty as his wife but lucky for him he seems to have not left as much of a paper trail. The FBI likes ironclad cases.
  #87  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by JRDelirious View Post

Loughlin's daughter not only was there just to party, she monetized her experience -- on move-in week she did a Sponsored Instagram share advertising how she furnished her dorm room through Amazon Prime. So at least she's got that much business sense.
Right there is a reason to go after the kids. She shouldn't be allowed to profit from her crime.
  #88  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:42 PM
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I think your impression of these various schools is out of date. UCLA is a top 20 school, ranked higher than USC in the linked list: https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges...l-universities

All of those schools listed earlier in this thread are elite and very difficult to get into.
I think you are confusing your specific knowledge with public perception. I have already started this thread so this one doesn't get derailed.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:45 PM
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The indictment had this exchange from a recorded phone call:

Parent: "And is there any risk that this thing blows up in my face?"
Cooperating Witness 1: "Hasn’t in 24 years."

In other words, this scheme has been going on since 1995.
  #90  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:48 PM
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Interestingly, one of the ways that this scam was sold to the parents was that it would actually be cheaper than the traditional "donate to the school and your child will get in" method. The perpetrator described it as a third method (after actually being qualified and making a donation) that was both less expensive and guaranteed to work.
  #91  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:51 PM
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Lock them up! Lock them up! Lock them up!
  #92  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:52 PM
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I think you are confusing your specific knowledge with public perception. I have already started this thread so this one doesn't get derailed.
While I posted on your new thread, based on when my younger daughter was applying to UCs, Berkeley and UCLA were definitely the top two. I'm surprised UCSD was on the list. Good school, but not all that prestigious.
  #93  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:55 PM
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I think your impression of these various schools is out of date. UCLA is a top 20 school, ranked higher than USC in the linked list: https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges...l-universities

All of those schools listed earlier in this thread are elite and very difficult to get into.
I don't know much about the USC undergrad program, but there is a Computer Engineering Masters program for money which shovels the students in and ejects them a while later with almost identical resumes and absolutely identical course work. I had to wade through about 100 of the damn things each year.
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:58 PM
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Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
Interestingly, one of the ways that this scam was sold to the parents was that it would actually be cheaper than the traditional "donate to the school and your child will get in" method. The perpetrator described it as a third method (after actually being qualified and making a donation) that was both less expensive and guaranteed to work.
I expanded on this in post #33.

Last edited by Manda JO; 03-12-2019 at 08:59 PM.
  #95  
Old 03-12-2019, 09:14 PM
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kids of alums get special help for free a lot of places. One thing they do for alum kids is if you are out of state then you get in based on the in state criteria which is easier.
Is this true? Given that in-state students pay less tuition, I think the schools would favor those from out of state.
  #96  
Old 03-12-2019, 09:25 PM
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Is this true? Given that in-state students pay less tuition, I think the schools would favor those from out of state.
Generally speaking, there's conflicting pressure. State legislatures (that set the funding) apply pressure on the schools to accept in-state (since that's the point of having a state university, and it's what their constituents want). However, as states cut funding, they have less leverage.

Generally speaking, the % in state/out of state is a political question as much as a financial one. And it's more complicated because even if they take 75% in-state, in-state may represent 90% of applications. So it can be harder to get in as an in-state student even though they make up a much larger percentage of the student body. But for the big flagships, it tends to go the other way--they get a LOT of out of state applications, and it can be a bloodbath. I think UT and Georgia Tech were both well under 10% for out of state this year.
  #97  
Old 03-12-2019, 10:42 PM
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As a parent of a college student who worked hard to get there and get scholarship money and that I am paying to close the gap to minimize her long term debt, and a college bound high-school junior that is also working hard to do well for his future, this makes me VERY FUCKING ANGRY! Fuck these families - they are assholes and terrible human beings!

Now, if the kid was unawares of mommy and daddy pulling strings and greasing palms behind the scenes to get their "pwecious wittew snowfwake" into the college of their choice, that is one thing. But, if you are taking the SAT by yourself and there is someone there looking over your shoulder and making corrections, you have to know that is not normal. Fuck you!!

OK, so this is all not very surprising that the rich use their power and influence to purchase a pedigree college tag for their offspring. The news is that they are getting caught and humiliated, which is good, but I am sure this poor behavior will continue and all this will be forgotten by the next news cycle or two.
  #98  
Old 03-12-2019, 10:59 PM
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There's a couple in my city who has sued the school district every year since their teenage daughter started kindergarten, because the district says she isn't qualified for the T&G program. Get a clue, folks (and don't bother with a college fund; just save up for the therapy bills).

I found out a while back that a mentally retarded HS classmate from a well-off family has a master's degree, and suspect this is how she got it. She certainly didn't belong in mainstream classes, let alone the college track, and am also puzzled as to how she managed to get AND KEEP a job as a high school art teacher. I remember that she got a 3 on her ACT (not 23, not 13, THREE) and teachers would give her sympathy C's and D's because they had to, I guess. In addition, since she was part of the ultra-mega-duper popularity crowd and I was not, when I was assigned to sit next to her, she would pat me on the head while speaking to me, usually using baby talk, until I asked her if she was a lesbian and told her to knock it off.

p.s. I know her behavior was because of my place in the pecking order, and not her mentation, because she didn't do it to other people.
Wait a minute, you know a mentally retarded girl who has a masters degree and was also popular, who may or not have been a lesbian and also a high school art teacher, wow that's some accomplished tard right!
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Last edited by pool; 03-12-2019 at 11:00 PM.
  #99  
Old 03-12-2019, 11:37 PM
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Oh, man. You would think William H. Macy, of all people, would know better than to get involved in some kind of harebrained criminal scheme. Those never end well.
Yeah, but that TruCoat....
  #100  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:25 AM
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Loughlin's daughter, who has something like 2 million followers on Instagram, has said she'd much rather make beauty tutorials than go to classes. Considering her SAT score, it seems obvious she wasn't college material in the first place, and with the fallout from the bribery scheme, she'll probably end up dropping out soon anyway. None of this will hurt her popularity. She'll probably go on to "create" (actually just sign her name to) a line of cosmetics and maybe a fashion line.

In a Christian Broadcasting Network interview 5 or 6 years ago, Laurie Loughlin said
Quote:
I always thought, I donít want to do anything that one day might rear its ugly head and my children have to pay the price for that.
Bitter irony.
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