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Old 02-13-2020, 01:45 PM
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Bizarre, Unsolved or Otherwise Infamous True Crime Cases From Your State / Country


I'm a big true crime buff, and spend a lot of my time binging on old episodes of Forensic Files or watching Youtubers like Rob Gavagan and Stephanie Harlowe (I'm also gaga for the TV show Criminal Minds!). So share with me an infamous, unsolved or terrifying tale of true crime from your home state (country, if outside the US, although you can get more specific by province/territory/city, if you like)! It can be old or recent, famous or obscure - you pick. Multiple stories from the same states/countries are welcome, as are links, so don't feel you need to summarize the entire thing.

I'll start:

Villisca, Iowa (Midwest US)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villisca_axe_murders

In 1912, the entire Moore family and two childhood friends (total of 8 people, 6 of them children) were murdered with an ax. It's suspected that the murder entered the house sometime the afternoon before, and waited in the attic for the family to go to sleep before emerging. While there have been a ton of suspects at the time, no one was ever proven guilty. The murders remain unsolved to this day, and the incident is undoubtedly Iowa's most infamous murder and lasting mystery.

You can tour the house and actually stay the night, if you're brave enough. It's always been a dream of mine to take a trip there with a couple friends. I've driving through the area once on my way back from Nashville, not realize where I was until I saw a sign for the "Ax Murder House" (certainly not something you drive past every day!). I think it's about 2-3 hours away from my city. If I ever do visit I'll be sure to take photos and maybe post a thread about my experience
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Old 02-13-2020, 01:51 PM
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Bunnyman Bridge:
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At the stroke of midnight on Halloween, a killer in a white rabbit suit awaits. Lore has it, if speak his name three times, he’ll appear. Bunny Man, Bunny Man, Bunny Man. But don’t expect to survive. He’ll slash your throat and leave your body dangling from the bridge.
Quote:
But what’s the truth behind the lore? Brian Conley, a historian-archivist for Fairfax Public Library, heard about the Bunny Man all his life. When he returned from college to work in the library system, the haunting tale seemed to follow him. After several patrons asked him about the truth of the stories, he set out to find out.

First he delved into Fairfax County police records, searching for reports of old and sensational murders, he wrote in his December 2008 paper, “The Bunny Man Unmasked: The Real Life Origins of an Urban Legend.”

He found one that might help account for some of the Bunny Man’s background. It happened in February 1949 and made headlines for months -- the gruesome slayings of a mother and her 8-month-old baby girl.

The two were found in a shallow grave in Fairfax after disappearing during a car ride with the husband.

Police soon found the victims in a shallow grave. The woman had been beaten and shot; the baby girl buried alive. The husband and father was eventually arrested, convicted and sent to a mental institution.

Next, the librarian searched for any evidence of a man dressed in a rabbit costume terrorizing people in the Washington region. According to his paper, he found a gem in the Washington Post, on Oct. 22, 1970. The headline read: “Man in Bunny Suit Sought in Fairfax.”

The story detailed the harrowing experience of an Air Force cadet who went “parking” with a girl on Guinea Road in Fairfax.

The military man told of a man in a white suit “with long bunny ears” throwing a hatchet through the car’s windshield, then “skipping off” into the night, according to Conley’s paper.

The Bunny Man made another appearance, according to the Post, on Oct. 30, 1970.

Neighbors on Guinea Road reported seeing a man in a bunny suit hacking away at a house under construction with a hatchet. Confronted by a security guard, the “bunny” ran off.

Police investigated, but never found any evidence of a Bunny Man in the area. After a few weeks, the case was filed away forever.

“Who the Bunny Man was and what motivated him to act in such a bizarre manner is still a mystery, however, the available evidence points to the October 1970 events as the genesis of the Bunny Man legend. And there you have one interpretation of the story,” Conley’s paper concludes.
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Old 02-13-2020, 03:01 PM
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The disappearance in May 2019 of Jennifer Dulos. Her estranged husband and his girlfriend were suspected but nothing was proven and then he committed suicide a couple of weeks ago. So we may never know what happened to her.
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Old 02-13-2020, 03:31 PM
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The one that comes back to me from time to time is the disappearance of Asha Degree. It was front page news for weeks in Charlotte, where I was still at the time very much a newcomer.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:32 PM
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Well, for 13 years the Superbike Motorsports quadruple murder was a mystery, but that was solved in 2016. Still left behind is the Blue Ridge Savings triple murder from 6 months earlier. It seems reasonable that that could have been the same guy, but they haven't been able to pin it on him.

One that sticks in my mind for some reason (enough that I actually remembered her name) was a Clemson student named Norsaadah Husain. Disappeared from a laundromat, leaving behind just a bloody floor. Her body was discovered two months later in the woods in a different town.

Another one: before I was born my mother used to work for a small Mom and Pop Drycleaners. She was good friends with the owners and we would visit them sometimes (mostly at the store but sometimes at their home) during my childhood, and I have lots of childhood memories of playing around in the store. In 2000, years after both the Mom and the Pop had died and the business had a new owner, sombody murdered a clerk in the store--just the job my mother used to do. Never solved.

Last edited by Darren Garrison; 02-13-2020 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:39 PM
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The one that comes back to me from time to time is the disappearance of Asha Degree. It was front page news for weeks in Charlotte, where I was still at the time very much a newcomer.
I'm pretty sure one of the channels / shows I cover featured that story. That poor kid's photo looks extremely familiar.

South Carolina is not my home state, but this is a case I've seen videos about before, and I find the note that was left especially chilling: http://charleyproject.org/case/korri...gers-malinoski

Basically, a girl's mother disappeared in 1987. She was never heard from again. Less than a year later, her 11 year old daughter was waiting at a bus stop. After that she vanished, leaving only a note: "Dad, momma came back. Give the boys a hug." (referring to her two step-brothers). She, likewise, hasn't been seen since.
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Old 02-13-2020, 05:09 PM
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Dennis Rader. Currently incarcerated about 75 miles from where I live.
Emily Sanders. The killer is currently incarcerated about 5 blocks from where I live. I can see the west wall of the prison from my back windows.

Which obviously mean that oh, yes, the Clutter family.
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Old 02-13-2020, 05:11 PM
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The Black Dahlia. Duh.
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Old 02-13-2020, 05:21 PM
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I live in California, so Charles Manson is probably the most infamous.

A bit less well known, but more local to me, was Dorothea Puente, a grandmotherly old lady dubbed the "Death House Landlady". She rented rooms in her home to the elderly and disabled, then murdered them, buried them in the yard, and continued to cash their Social Security checks. The house, an historic Victorian near downtown Sacramento, has become a bit of a minor tourist attraction, and the current homeowners acknowledge what happened there with signs and a dummy of Puente on the porch.

Last edited by WildaBeast; 02-13-2020 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 02-13-2020, 05:43 PM
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2018 thread: Unsolved mysteries and murders.

Nine year old Erica Baker went missing 21 years ago. It happened one block from where we lived.
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Old 02-13-2020, 06:02 PM
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My pet theory: Certain loose ends from the OJ Simpson case.

I don't doubt for a moment that he did it. But I have had this theory that, after a long history of known hostility and threats toward his ex-wife, he finally had a total psychotic break, wherein he did it, and afterward was totally unaware that he did it.
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Old 02-13-2020, 06:10 PM
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Another one from my area: the disappearance of Cheryl Coker 15 months ago. Am guessing her husband had something to do with it.
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Old 02-13-2020, 06:20 PM
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I've lived in Colorado a little over 4 years. I think the Jon Benet Ramsey murder is the state's most prominent unsolved case.

Regarding where I'm from, I can't really think of any prominent unsolved cases...Florida people tend to do their weird shit all out in the open.
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Old 02-13-2020, 06:42 PM
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In 1970, in West Virginia, two female college students ("coeds") were brutally murdered. The region's isolation and low crime rate made the crime even more perplexing, and terrifying. I was a young kid and remember the 'stranger danger' fear going through the roof.

About six years later, a suspect (already in prison) was tried and convicted, but many were skeptical.

Some authors and retired police detectives who've been examining the case for decades have some ideas. One of the most feasible IMO involves another rapist/kidnapper who died in prison in 2002.

https://www.coedmurders.com/
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:40 PM
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The Gilgo Beach murders (what they're generally known as on Long Island).

While searching for Shannan Gilbert, who disappeared in the area in 2010, 10 bodies were found (separately, not in a group) dumped in a marshy area off Ocean Parkway on the South Shore of the Island. Gilbert's body was found later. None of these murders has yet been solved, but speculation of course is that it's the result of one or more serial killers. (Gilbert's death isn't thought to be linked to the others and may have been at least partially an accident, drowning after tripping in the marsh, but she seemed to have been fleeing from ... what?)

Still a mystery, still being investigated, and still popping up in the local news from time to time.
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Old 02-13-2020, 08:21 PM
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The Alphabet Murders. Three young girls were abducted, raped, and murdered within a two year period in the early seventies. All three had first and last names that started with the same letter. And all three were abducted in the city of Rochester but their bodies were found miles away in the suburbs - and in each case it was a suburb whose name started with the same letter as the victim's name.

Nobody was sure whether it was the work of a single killer or a horrible coincidence. All three cases are still unsolved.
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Old 02-13-2020, 10:48 PM
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Around here, there was Claire Lortie. She was a lawyer who hired an entrepreneur in the summer of 1983 to dig a hole on her property, supposedly to find the sewer connection. The digger found this odd because he knew the sewer wasn't in that part of the lot. She insisted, he dug the hole, but he also warned his brother who was the local police chief. When the police came to investigate, the hole had been filled up; when they dug again, they found a freezer with Ms. Lortie's former spouse inside. In pieces.

At trial, she claimed she had found his dead body (and that she didn't know who had killed him). She said he had decided to cut him up, freeze the resulting parts, arrange for the freezer to be moved from the basement to a pick-up truck (the lid must have been locked, I guess), then have the hole dug and push the freezer down into the hole herself.

The jury eventually acquitted her of the murder charge.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:30 PM
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Not unsolved, but infamous.

The murders of Don Bolles and Bob Crane.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:42 PM
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Here in Australia the disappearance of Prime Minister Harold Holt has never been explained, it probably wasn't a crime but nobody knows for sure

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disapp...of_Harold_Holt

Last edited by steepone; 02-13-2020 at 11:43 PM.
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Old 02-14-2020, 12:05 AM
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The Hall-Mills murders in New Jersey in 1922 were never solved. A clergyman and one of his choir members were having an affair and were murdered in a field. The man's wife and her two brothers were charged and tried, but acquitted for insufficient evidence.

I'm currently reading a novel very loosely based on the trial, which was the most notorious and widely covered until the Lindbergh trial took over that honor a few years later. The novel is called The Bellamy Case by Frances Noyes Hart, and it is a real page-turner. Unlike real life, the author provides a solution at the end in the form of a confession letter.
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Old 02-14-2020, 01:48 AM
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Here in Ireland, it would be the disappearance of Philip Cairns.

In 1986, A 13 year old school boy left home to return to school after lunch, and joined a throng of perhaps 1200 other school kids also returning from lunch. He vanished, without a single trace. All the schools involved had school uniforms :- somebody somewhere should surely have noticed a kid in uniform getting into a car, or even walking the wrong way (away from school).


6 days after his disappearance, his school bag was found in a lane about 200 meters from his home, with the religious knowledge and geography books missing. The lane had been previously searched, and the police believe the bag was placed there shortly before it was found.

Nothing more is publicly known than what I've recounted. About 3 years later, the missing school books were found on enclosed waste land about a mile from Philip's home. This has never been publicly disclosed, for exclusionary reasons (I know this because a then girlfriend worked in a office building adjoining the waste land).

As it happens, my childhood home was 10 houses away from Philips's : I spent many weekends at the time as part of search parties combing the Wicklow mountains.
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Old 02-14-2020, 02:00 AM
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Here in San Luis Obispo, where I've lived for most of the last 28 years, the Kristin Smart case has been in the news lately with rumors of new developments.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disapp..._Kristin_Smart
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Old 02-14-2020, 10:41 AM
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Around here, there was Claire Lortie. She was a lawyer who hired an entrepreneur in the summer of 1983 to dig a hole on her property, supposedly to find the sewer connection. The digger found this odd because he knew the sewer wasn't in that part of the lot. She insisted, he dug the hole, but he also warned his brother who was the local police chief. When the police came to investigate, the hole had been filled up; when they dug again, they found a freezer with Ms. Lortie's former spouse inside. In pieces.

At trial, she claimed she had found his dead body (and that she didn't know who had killed him). She said he had decided to cut him up, freeze the resulting parts, arrange for the freezer to be moved from the basement to a pick-up truck (the lid must have been locked, I guess), then have the hole dug and push the freezer down into the hole herself.

The jury eventually acquitted her of the murder charge.
It's kind of baffling how often people apparently stumble across dead spouses / family members, seeing how often this defense is used. At this rate I'm beginning to seriously fear for my parents!
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Old 02-14-2020, 10:54 AM
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One of the more famous, D.B Cooper.
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Old 02-14-2020, 10:55 AM
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Growing up, we had to deal with the Oakland County Child Killer, a serial killer working in our area targeting children the same age as my older siblings. This was back in the mid 70s, and the killer has never been identified although there has been new findings in the last couple of years.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:25 AM
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Here in Missouri:

On July 10, 1981, town bully and generally bad dude Ken McElroy was shot to death in broad daylight, in the middle of town in Skidmore, in front of 20-30 witnesses.

But nobody saw anything, and the case remains unsolved to this day.

Last edited by HeyHomie; 02-14-2020 at 11:26 AM.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post
Here in San Luis Obispo, where I've lived for most of the last 28 years, the Kristin Smart case has been in the news lately with rumors of new developments.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disapp..._Kristin_Smart
I knew more than a few people involved in that case and had heard there were some new developments. As I'm sure you know, the case has been solved for years. They just can't prove he was the one who (allegedly) did it. Without a body, pretty tough.

I hope the new developments garner a conclusion. That poor family.

____

My own pick for this thread is the same one as I mentioned in the previous thread, also in San Luis Obispo. An honest-to-goodness whodunit without even the hint of a suspect, the victim, Marina Ruggiero was from out of town, an innocent woman attending the wedding of her childhood friend. She left the reception to go back to her room at the hotel and 45 minutes later, was found brutally stabbed to death in her room. It still gives me the creeps.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:39 AM
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Rhode Island checking in:

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Adam Emery, his wife Elena Emery, and two friends were at a roadside food stand when their car was side swiped. Adam became distraught and followed who he believed to have struck his vehicle. After successfully causing the other car to stop, witness accounts say Adam ran to the driver's side and fatally stabbed the driver, 20 year old Jay Bass through the heart.

Further investigation proved that not only had Adam followed the wrong car, but he showed little to no remorse for his actions. After being convicted of second degree murder for the crime in 1993, the couple's abandoned vehicle was found on the Newport Bridge and the pair were suspected to have died by suicide. Though Elena's remains were eventually discovered, Adam's body has not been found and he remains on the FBI's most wanted list.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:53 AM
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Everyone has gone with murders so far, but I'll try a theft.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabel...r_Museum_theft

In 1990, thieves dressed as police officers gained access to the museum, tied up the guards, and stole $500 million worth of art. None of it has ever been recovered, and there are essentially no leads at this point.
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Old 02-14-2020, 12:20 PM
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In my neck of the woods, it was the Zodiac Killer.

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Zodiac Killer is the pseudonym of an unidentified serial killer who operated in Northern California from at least the late 1960s to the early 1970s. The Zodiac murdered victims in Benicia, Vallejo, Napa County, and San Francisco between December 1968 and October 1969. The killer targeted four men and three women between the ages of 16 and 29, with two of the men surviving attempted murder. The Zodiac himself claimed to have killed up to 37 victims. The killer originated the name "Zodiac" in a series of taunting letters and cards sent to the local Bay Area press. The letters included four cryptograms (or ciphers). Of the four cryptograms sent, only one has been definitively solved.[1]

Suspects have been named by law enforcement and amateur investigators, but no conclusive evidence has surfaced. The San Francisco Police Department marked the case "inactive" in April 2004, but re-opened it at some point prior to March 2007.[2][3] The case also remains open in the city of Vallejo, as well as in Napa County and Solano County.[4] The California Department of Justice has maintained an open case file on the Zodiac murders since 1969.[5]
I was just a kid, but I remember hearing the talk.
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Old 02-14-2020, 12:39 PM
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Everyone has gone with murders so far, but I'll try a theft.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabel...r_Museum_theft

In 1990, thieves dressed as police officers gained access to the museum, tied up the guards, and stole $500 million worth of art. None of it has ever been recovered, and there are essentially no leads at this point.
While visiting the museum a few years ago, the people there seemed convinced it was organized by Whitey Bulger and were hopeful the pieces would be found or returned on his death. Since he died a year and a half ago, I guess not.
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Old 02-14-2020, 04:40 PM
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The Hall-Mills murders in New Jersey in 1922 were never solved. A clergyman and one of his choir members were having an affair and were murdered in a field. The man's wife and her two brothers were charged and tried, but acquitted for insufficient evidence.

I'm currently reading a novel very loosely based on the trial, which was the most notorious and widely covered until the Lindbergh trial took over that honor a few years later. The novel is called The Bellamy Case by Frances Noyes Hart, and it is a real page-turner. Unlike real life, the author provides a solution at the end in the form of a confession letter.

That’s what I was going to mention. Any case that has a character dubbed “The Pig Woman” has to be mentioned.

It was the trial of the century until there were others.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall–Mills_murder_case
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Old 02-14-2020, 05:08 PM
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Well for bizarre, New Hampshire had a man arrested for standing in the tank of woman's outhouse in White Mountain National Forest back in 2005.

https://www.wmur.com/article/man-pul...e-tank/5142933

https://www.fosters.com/article/2005...0201/106290019
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Old 02-14-2020, 05:10 PM
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My county sheriff has a cold cases page seeking any information on listed homicides.

Steven Lee Stafford (20 years old) killed by blunt force in 1997.
Dennis Palmer (33 years old) found in a mine shaft in 1987.
Gloria Shomler (33 years old) stabbed in bed in 1987.

Those are pretty damn cold cases, from 23 and 33 years ago.
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Old 02-14-2020, 06:49 PM
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Texas is a big state

Unusual:
The Murder of Scott Dunn -interesting because IIRC it was the first case in Texas that was tried as a murder without a corpus delecti - luminol showed so much blood in the victims apartment that the coroner? or at least the person who could speak to the issue, said that there was no way a person could be alive after losing that much blood. One of the stories in a true crime book called "The Murder Room" by Michael Capuzzo

Infamous:
The University of Texas Tower Shooting.
1966 - one of the earliest of the mass shootings, a lone gunman went to the 27th floor of a building at the University of Texas and killed people until he was killed. One of my university professors was a student at UT when the shooting spree occurred.

Unsolved and close to home
Three girls disappeared in 1974, from Seminary South - a mall just a few miles from where I lived at the time, about the same age as I was.
Never been solved.

Honorable mention to my great-uncle for being involved in a missing person case that stank to high heaven, and for helping with some rather stupidly done extortion attempts, that I've discussed here before

That's just the tip of the iceberg
  #36  
Old 02-14-2020, 08:03 PM
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In the early 1980s, two newspaper carriers disappeared from the Des Moines, Iowa area without a trace. My sister went to school with Eugene Martin, the second one.

https://iowacoldcases.org/case-summaries/eugene-martin/

My brother was a paper boy at the time this first one happened.

https://iowacoldcases.org/case-summaries/johnny-gosch/

I was still living in Des Moines when this one (he wasn't a paperboy) happened, and I have no recollection of ever hearing about it until I saw it on this website a few years ago.

https://iowacoldcases.org/case-summaries/marc-allen/
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Old 02-14-2020, 09:57 PM
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This one was close to home, literally. Hawaii. Diane Suzuki was a dance teacher in the building my Dad had his business in. My Mom, Dad and niece knew her because she'd let my niece (too young to start dance classes) watch from the side of the classroom. Diane disappeared after class in 1985 and the prime suspect was the photographer in the next building whom my parents also knew. My Mom talked about how we was always staring at Diane whenever he saw her and supposedly asked her our several times but she refused.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:05 PM
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This one happened a few miles from my house in Maryland and it's possible I went to the same high school parties as the guy. I went to a different school but some of my classmates knew him and one's father was his defense attorney. The killings were pretty gruesome:


Biography of Larry Swartz, Convicted Murderer

Quote:
According to Larry, Kay's response was sarcastic and belittling. In response, Larry picked up a nearby wood-splitting maul and smash it over her head. He then stabbed her multiple times in the neck with a kitchen knife.

Bob came in to see what was going on and Larry plunged the knife into his chest. He continued stabbing Bob around his chest and heart multiple times. Once Bob and Kay were dead, Larry busied himself trying to make it look like a crime that was committed by someone who had broken into the house.

...

The case was the inspiration for the best-selling book by Leslie Walker, "Sudden Fury: A True Story of Adoption and Murder." In addition to the book, a movie based on the murders was made in 1993 called "A Family Torn Apart," which starred Neil Patrick Harris of "Doogie Howser, M.D." as Larry Swartz.
Johnny Galecki from The Big Bang theory was also in it. And I've seen the case on one of the true-crime shows.
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Old 02-14-2020, 11:36 PM
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The disappearance of Maud Crawford , a prominent S. Arkansas Attorney.
Very interesting tale of greed and very rich families in Ouachita county.
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Old 02-15-2020, 12:18 AM
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Originally Posted by HeyHomie View Post
Here in Missouri:

On July 10, 1981, town bully and generally bad dude Ken McElroy was shot to death in broad daylight, in the middle of town in Skidmore, in front of 20-30 witnesses.

But nobody saw anything, and the case remains unsolved to this day.
I readvhe wiki article you linked to, theme wanderecinto the wiki article only Nodaway County, where Skidmore is located.

The article has a section entitled "Crime": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nodawa...Missouri#Crime

Jeepers! Is that amount of murder and mayhem standard for counties in Missouri? In the US?
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Old 02-15-2020, 01:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
I readvhe wiki article you linked to, theme wanderecinto the wiki article only Nodaway County, where Skidmore is located.

The article has a section entitled "Crime": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nodawa...Missouri#Crime

Jeepers! Is that amount of murder and mayhem standard for counties in Missouri? In the US?
That region is very poverty-stricken, and meth is a horrible problem.
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Old 02-15-2020, 03:46 AM
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(...)
At trial, she claimed she had found his dead body (and that she didn't know who had killed him). She said he had decided to cut him up, freeze the resulting parts, arrange for the freezer to be moved from the basement to a pick-up truck (the lid must have been locked, I guess), then have the hole dug and push the freezer down into the hole herself.

The jury eventually acquitted her of the murder charge.
Ahem, the bolded part should have been: "She said she had decided to... " . Sorry about that.
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Old 02-15-2020, 07:32 AM
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Where I come from, the obvious candidate is Jack the Ripper. There was also a series of murders of women in areas close to the Thames in west London in the 1960s, though I believe the police thought they had identified the killer, who had conveniently killed himself before they could charge him.

Or there's the mysterious disappearance of Victor Grayson
  #44  
Old 02-15-2020, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Zyada View Post
... it was the first case in Texas that was tried as a murder without a corpus delecti ...
I do not think that word means what you think it means.

You are not the first person to make such a mistake.
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Old 02-15-2020, 09:51 AM
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I live in a city where everybody knows everything about everybody. However, googling came up with this "Bizarro" case:

Quote:
Gertrude Bizarro

On Dec. 18, 2001 Gertrude Bizarro was murdered inside her home on Sisco Place in Clifton. The 72-year-old grandmother had been stabbed multiple times in the upper body and neck, according to police. Bizarro’s husband, Chet, and her youngest daughter June, found the body when they came home. The family has said in interviews they don’t know why anyone would want to kill Bizarro, whom they described as “kind.” Police at the time said the slaying appeared to have been a burglary gone bad.
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Old 02-15-2020, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by dasmoocher View Post
This one happened a few miles from my house in Maryland and it's possible I went to the same high school parties as the guy. I went to a different school but some of my classmates knew him and one's father was his defense attorney. The killings were pretty gruesome:


Biography of Larry Swartz, Convicted Murderer



Johnny Galecki from The Big Bang theory was also in it. And I've seen the case on one of the true-crime shows.
There is another famous crime linked to Johnny Galecki. Robert Marshall hired killers to kill his wife at a rest area on the Garden State Parkway.

Joe McGinnis wrote a book called Blind Faith about the case. It was made into an excellent miniseries starring Robert Urich as Marshall and Joanna Kerns as his wife. In my opinion it’s probably Urich’s best work. A large part of the story was how his son’s believed his story that they were attacked and robbed randomly but eventually became convinced that he had her killed. Johnny Galecki played one of the Marshall sons.

An interesting Hollywood side note: one of the sons Roby Marshall was a consultant on the mini-series. Joanna Kerns played his mother. She introduced him to Tracey Gold who played her daughter on Growing Pains. Marshall and Gold have been married since 1994 and have 4 sons.
  #47  
Old 02-15-2020, 10:29 AM
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For my home state, The Curious Case of Ed Gein. He turned dead bodies into furniture not more than 30 miles from where i grew up. He inspired at least two movies.
  #48  
Old 02-15-2020, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by dorvann View Post
Well for bizarre, New Hampshire had a man arrested for standing in the tank of woman's outhouse in White Mountain National Forest back in 2005.

https://www.wmur.com/article/man-pul...e-tank/5142933

https://www.fosters.com/article/2005...0201/106290019
I was thinking he was spotted after someone saw the red light from his camcorder, but maybe that was a different weirdo.
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Old 02-15-2020, 11:09 AM
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Not unsolved, but both bizarre and awful – Bentley and Craig.

In short: in November 1952, while attempting to rob a warehouse in Croyden, South of London, Derek Bentley (aged 19) and Chris Craig (16) were spotted and the police called. Craig was armed with a pistol, Bentley with a knuckle duster. On the roof of the warehouse, Bentley was tackled by an officer, but broke free; the office then ordered Craig to "Hand over the gun, lad" and Bentley shouted (according to police witnesses), "Let him have it, Chris" – at which, Craig shot and wounded the officer, and subsequently shot and killed another.

Quote:
Bentley was convicted as a party to murder, by the English law principle of common purpose, "joint enterprise". The jury at the trial found Bentley guilty based on the prosecution's interpretation of the ambiguous phrase "Let him have it" (Bentley's alleged exhortation to Craig), after the judge, Lord Chief Justice Goddard, had described Bentley as "mentally aiding the murder of Police Constable Sidney Miles". Goddard sentenced Bentley to be hanged: at the time, no other sentence was possible because of the conditions of the crime.
Craig, who fired the shots, was too young to be executed (age limit 18).

The trial itself was hugely controversial – the meaning of "Let him have it, Chris" was unclear (either “shoot him” or “hand over the gun”), and Bentley and Craig denied that it had ever been said. Bentley’s mental age was such that it was debatable whether he was even fit to stand trial. Subsequently it was shown that Bentley’s “confession” had been, to say the least, “cleaned up” by the police. Bentley was hanged in 1953; his conviction was eventually overturned in 1998. This was one of the cases which led to the abolition of capital punishment in the UK.

j
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Old 02-15-2020, 11:52 AM
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Four prostitutes murdered near Atlantic City. I had direct involvement in the investigation just prior to my retirement in 2007. It remains unsolved. I'm not sure who coined it the Eastbound Strangler but I suppose every sensational case needs a name. No one in the LE community refers to it as such.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastbound_Strangler
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