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Old 12-30-2019, 08:56 AM
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"Too old" for video games?


Even though video games have become more mainstream as a hobby, there's still a stigma against adults playing them, with some people thinking you're a manchild for still playing video games as an adult.

Are you ever "too old" for video games?
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:58 AM
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I think there's an age when you have enough responsibilities that you need to prioritize other things over video games and not everyone is able to recognize that. That's a problem.

That isn't unique to gaming though, but I think it might be harder to do with gaming.

It doesn't mean you can't play games at all. It just means you need to be responsible.

Last edited by Palooka; 12-30-2019 at 10:00 AM.
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Old 12-30-2019, 10:00 AM
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Are you ever "too old" for video games?
No. You may lose your fast twitch speed but there is nothing wrong with playing video games. If you live your life worried about what others think, you are going to be unhappy.
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Old 12-30-2019, 10:21 AM
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Are you ever "too old" for video games?
Absolutely. It's the same age where you're too old to watch TV or go to the movies or read books or play chess or engage in any other leisure activity during your downtime

People who think I'm a "manchild" for spending my time chatting with friends and shootin' some dudes (virtually, of course) instead of watching sitcoms or sports all night long are probably boring people I don't want to impress anyway.
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Old 12-30-2019, 10:34 AM
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I think there's an age when you have enough responsibilities that you need to prioritize other things over video games and not everyone is able to recognize that. That's a problem.

That isn't unique to gaming though, but I think it might be harder to do with gaming.

It doesn't mean you can't play games at all. It just means you need to be responsible.
Good answer. I think a big part of the stigma (though not all of it) is against adults who spend too much time playing video games.
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Old 12-30-2019, 10:35 AM
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I think there's an age when you have enough responsibilities that you need to prioritize other things over video games and not everyone is able to recognize that. That's a problem.

That isn't unique to gaming though, but I think it might be harder to do with gaming.

It doesn't mean you can't play games at all. It just means you need to be responsible.
I agree. I think it's the presence of responsibilities and how you deal with them in relation to the gaming that is telling. It really only becomes a manchild thing when video games are taking precedence over responsibilities, and when they're the ONLY thing you do or can talk about. Which is true of anything else- I know plenty of sports manchildren as well.

The set of people who view video games as somehow juvenile is decreasing, either through age-related attrition, or because video games are becoming more mainstream and people see that all sorts of people play video games.
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Old 12-30-2019, 11:08 AM
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The set of people who view video games as somehow juvenile is decreasing, either through age-related attrition
Primarily this.

When mainstream TV commercials feature middle aged fathers playing video games or getting PS4s or XBoxes or whatever, there is no real stigma. If I saw anybody express any stigma, I would guess they were approaching or already over retirement age.

Last edited by Great Antibob; 12-30-2019 at 11:09 AM.
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Old 12-30-2019, 02:09 PM
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Primarily this.

When mainstream TV commercials feature middle aged fathers playing video games or getting PS4s or XBoxes or whatever, there is no real stigma. If I saw anybody express any stigma, I would guess they were approaching or already over retirement age.
I don't know... I'm 47, and there's still something of an unspoken stigma among people my age. I'm not sure if it's an anti-dork/nerd stigma or if it's an anti-video game stigma, but it's there.

I mean, it's seen as something you do with your children, not something you engage in as a primary hobby. Or at best, something you do casually, but not seriously or frequently. If I was in an alternate reality where I was not married, I wouldn't think that mentioning video games as a main hobby would be a neutral thing on the dating sites of today with women my age. Nor would it be something I'd bring up early when dating.

I think it's more accepted than it was, but I don't think it's exactly without stigma yet either.
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Old 12-30-2019, 02:22 PM
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Not at all. Up until just a few years ago I was still interested in playing role playing games. And I still play an old (excellent) football simulation and with it (as I've hinted at a few times on this board) I simulate a Greatest Players of All Time league for every N.F.L. franchise. It's probably not everybody's cup of tea but I find it to be quite entertaining!
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Old 12-30-2019, 05:10 PM
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I'm 46 and noticed no stigma. 1970s kids (mostly boys) grew up playing video games and what's more, video games grew up with us. I remember the Atari when I was really small (didn't always have one), but Nintendo brought a lot of quarter-operated cabinet tech into the living room. Then, as PCs got progressively more powerful and cheaper, gaming there transitioned from everything being indy games (I can't count the number of games I played "way back when" that had credits of less than six people) to the powerhouse it is today. If you roll platform and PC gaming into one industry (totally appropriate, given they are developed using the same tech and there are a lot of title released for both) it is larger in capitalization than the motion picture industry. The nerds went from propeller hat to suit and tie!

I play all kinds of stuff (when I have time). Sea of Thieves on Xbox for fairly mindless mayhem, Civ 6 on PC for more thoughtful, contemplative strategy, and Roll20, 5e Dungeons and Dragons because . . . because DnD, that's why!
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Old 12-30-2019, 05:12 PM
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I think the stigma is disappearing. Women in their 30's are supposed to be the largest consumer of mobile games.
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Old 12-30-2019, 05:18 PM
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No. You may lose your fast twitch speed but there is nothing wrong with playing video games. If you live your life worried about what others think, you are going to be unhappy.
I'm in my fifties, and never mastered the joystick, and I felt I'm too old to do so now. Which makes me sad, because I think video games are the latest new art form: like novels or opera or movies. Revelations of accessible games (for me to enjoy while i practice those skills) would be appreciated.

But most of my single friends play video games, including ones who are in their forties and fifties. I don't see any stigma. Yeah, if you do nothing but play video games, and you don't do your laundry or cook your own dinner, that's shameful. But if you are a competent adult doing the stuff that you need to do, and you enjoy some games in your downtime, I think that's completely normal.
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Old 12-30-2019, 05:19 PM
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Oh, I forgot to mention Shirley Curry. Youtuber who casts herself playing Skyrim and such. 86 y/o with over 700k subscribers.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzk...sxv4M5NyUYgTmA
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Old 12-30-2019, 08:03 PM
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I’m almost 52 and have an XBox One but I fired it up for the first time in almost a year over Christmas break. I play less because I am older and can’t stay up until 4am playing and most of my free time is taken up with the unprecedented amount of great TV available today but there’s other reasons I play less that has nothing to do with age.

-Too few sports and good racing games. I’m not a big adventure game or shoot em up guy, which seems most games are leaning towards. 10-15 years ago I could get rugby, GOOD NASCAR, boxing, college football games. Not anymore. Xbox One doesn’t even offer a good MLB game.

-The download times are obnoxious. I sat down to play a Star Wars game at 230 today, by 530 it hadn’t completely loaded and I gave up. I appreciate the work and graphics that go into these games and that’s why they take so long to download, but I pine for the days when I could just load a cartridge or a disc and start playing immediately.

Nowadays, 99.9% of my video game time is limited to 3-4 card, dice or pool games on the iPad. I GUESS I could buy one of those retro consoles but I know the graphics will blow. I want great graphics AND for the game to start right away!


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Old 12-30-2019, 11:15 PM
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I'm in my fifties, and never mastered the joystick, and I felt I'm too old to do so now. Which makes me sad, because I think video games are the latest new art form: like novels or opera or movies. Revelations of accessible games (for me to enjoy while i practice those skills) would be appreciated.
Most newer story-driven games have an Easy or "Story" mode where enemies are weak, the player ranges from strong to just unkillable and you get assistance in combat and "twitch" sections (like jumping a platform puzzle). The intent is for you to experience the story even if you aren't very good at the game aspects.

Obviously this doesn't hold for games that are competitive shooters or otherwise revolve around being skill tests but those aren't trying to revolutionize story-telling either.
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Old 12-31-2019, 06:04 AM
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I'm actually hoping to learn some of those skills, and wondered if there are any suitable "entry level" games. Like MS bundled mines and some solitaire game with the first windows os that required you to use a mouse, to train users on the mouse.
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Old 12-31-2019, 07:06 AM
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I'm actually hoping to learn some of those skills, and wondered if there are any suitable "entry level" games. Like MS bundled mines and some solitaire game with the first windows os that required you to use a mouse, to train users on the mouse.
I mean, this is a thread in itself, but a lot of modern games are actually pretty good at easing you in. And the only way to learn them is to jump in. I'd make suggestions but I'm not sure what you'd be looking for!
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Old 12-31-2019, 07:21 AM
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I'm 55 and female and gave myself a Sega Genesis Mini for Christmas and no one thought it was odd - not even my 20something male co-workers.

There are lots of games that don't require lots of hand/eye coordination, like the Navy Drew games.
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Old 12-31-2019, 08:13 AM
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I'm 55 and female and gave myself a Sega Genesis Mini for Christmas and no one thought it was odd
I bought the Sega Genesis Mini myself. I loved the Genesis back in the day and the mini is some good nostalgia. FTR, I'm 52.
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:15 AM
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I'm 46 and noticed no stigma. 1970s kids (mostly boys) grew up playing video games and what's more, video games grew up with us.
When I'm saying there's a stigma, I'm not saying there's persecution, shunning, or mockery, but rather that it's STILL not discussed openly.

I mean, I can think of ONE adult man over about 35 who I talk about video games with who's not in the following groups- college video game buddies, my brother, or my current video gaming buddies who I've played online with for 15 years now.

Every other time a group of men roughly my age get together, the talk seems to always track with sports, food, booze, movies, etc... but not video games. I'm sure plenty of them do play video games, but nobody talks about it. Maybe it's a self-imposed stigma, or maybe it's larger than that- I dont' know.

I also want to draw a distinction between "video games" as a catchall category, and casual vs. more "serious" games. Plenty of people play stuff like Words with Friends or Candy Crush on their phones, but that doesn't really make them a video gamer in the sense that I'm talking about.
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:24 AM
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Every other time a group of men roughly my age get together, the talk seems to always track with sports, food, booze, movies, etc... but not video games. I'm sure plenty of them do play video games, but nobody talks about it. Maybe it's a self-imposed stigma, or maybe it's larger than that- I dont' know.
You think a stigma is a more plausible explanation of why they don't talk about video games than either
1. They don't play video games, or
2. They play them, but they don't find them all that interesting to talk about?
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:28 AM
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I would bet that as the generations who played video games as kids reach retirement age, spending a significant amount of time in one's retirement playing video games will become a normal, mainstream thing to do.

Here is an article about "Gamer Grandpas:"
https://melmagazine.com/en-us/story/...ent-senior-men

Last edited by Arcite; 12-31-2019 at 10:29 AM.
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:52 AM
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Every other time a group of men roughly my age get together, the talk seems to always track with sports, food, booze, movies, etc... but not video games.
That seems a bit different. Those are considered 'safe' topics with people you generally don't know or don't know all that well.

When I started my current job, the list of topics I'd talk about with my co-workers was limited to the weather, the local sports teams, the latest Netflix/Hulu/whatever TV series (and only the major ones - no arthouse stuff), maybe politics but nothing too controversial, and local restaurants.

As I got to know them, did video games gradually enter topics of discussion? Sure. But so have the weird eastern European movie I saw, discussions on cannibalism, and unintended consequences of a truly free market.

Some topics are 'safe' because everybody can be assumed to be able to take part. It's a weird thing, but we like talking about the weather in the US. That is a topic I can bring up with a stranger at the airport, and it would be 'normal'. That wouldn't be the case in other countries, and it would be considered outright strange in some. Other topics, especially hobbies that not everybody may enjoy, won't be part of casual conversation unless the audience is already familiar or known.

Last edited by Great Antibob; 12-31-2019 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:59 AM
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You think a stigma is a more plausible explanation of why they don't talk about video games than either
1. They don't play video games, or
2. They play them, but they don't find them all that interesting to talk about?
I'm 44, and I've never noticed such a stigma. I'm not really a "serious" gamer though -- I mean, I have a Steam account and a couple of times a year I may summon the energy to play through a couple, but I'm more a retro gamer (working through Zelda: Wind Waker right now.) I can't think of any men my age who don't occasionally play a video game, if not regularly. I guess we don't talk about it a lot, but it's not because we're ashamed or anything, it's just not much to talk about for us. My brother plays video games constantly, but I also don't hear him talking about it much except if I ask him what he's currently working on.
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Old 12-31-2019, 11:28 AM
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I'm 44, and I've never noticed such a stigma. [...] I can't think of any men my age who don't occasionally play a video game, if not regularly.
I'm 46 and don't know any men my age "in real life" who play video games unless they're part of my D&D groups. Granted, they could be keeping it all top secret but I've been to their houses and no one has a gaming rig (unless a c.2007 Dell counts as a gaming rig) or console outside of their kid's room. Guess it depends on who you hang out with.

Now, I won't discount the potential that they have some game on their phone or have played their kid's Xbox once or twice but I'm confident that any of them would react to "How about that new Outer Worlds game, huh? as though I just asked them what they thought of Jell-O xylophone polish. That said, I don't think they'd throw beer bottles at me and call me a dork either, but we wouldn't be finding any common ground.
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Old 12-31-2019, 12:16 PM
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That seems a bit different. Those are considered 'safe' topics with people you generally don't know or don't know all that well.
I'd call that something of a stigma, if people are reticent to discuss a topic until they know the people better and feel like they can trust them.

It may not mark you as a total dork, but IMO, it's still regarded on the same plane as say... model trains or other stuff generally regarded as kid stuff, but that some adults are into anyway.

Supposedly the median age of your average gamer is something like 31, which means that half of all gamers are older than 31. I'm not sure what the distribution is like, but I'd wager it's NOT a normal distribution- all the high school and college kids playing would tend to skew it younger. Which also implies that the older half is probably fairly evenly distributed up to a certain age (my guess would be early 50s), giving us a lot of thirty and forty-something gamers. But it's just not discussed, even if half of all gamers are above 31. That makes me think that there's still something of a social distaste/unacceptability surrounding it.
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Old 12-31-2019, 12:22 PM
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I'm 46 and don't know any men my age "in real life" who play video games unless they're part of my D&D groups. Granted, they could be keeping it all top secret but I've been to their houses and no one has a gaming rig (unless a c.2007 Dell counts as a gaming rig) or console outside of their kid's room. Guess it depends on who you hang out with.
I guess so. None of my friends were into D&D or hard-core gaming, but they all seem to enjoy playing video games from time to time. My brother's friends (he's 38), it's even much more so. I think all his friends have XBoxOnes and Switches and that sort of stuff, and they're not the stereotypical "nerdy" gamers. From my perspective, playing video games is absolutely mainstream and one of many typical ways to unwind after a long day of work.
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Old 12-31-2019, 12:55 PM
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When I'm saying there's a stigma, I'm not saying there's persecution, shunning, or mockery, but rather that it's STILL not discussed openly.

I mean, I can think of ONE adult man over about 35 who I talk about video games with who's not in the following groups- college video game buddies, my brother, or my current video gaming buddies who I've played online with for 15 years now.

Every other time a group of men roughly my age get together, the talk seems to always track with sports, food, booze, movies, etc... but not video games. I'm sure plenty of them do play video games, but nobody talks about it. Maybe it's a self-imposed stigma, or maybe it's larger than that- I dont' know.

I also want to draw a distinction between "video games" as a catchall category, and casual vs. more "serious" games. Plenty of people play stuff like Words with Friends or Candy Crush on their phones, but that doesn't really make them a video gamer in the sense that I'm talking about.
Your social group is different from mine. I guess I mostly hang out with people who are either older or younger than I am, so maybe I don't hang with the "plays clandestinely" crowd. But my younger friends all talk about gaming, casually, like talking about popular TV shows. And my older friends mostly don't play video games.
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Old 12-31-2019, 01:35 PM
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Your social group is different from mine. I guess I mostly hang out with people who are either older or younger than I am, so maybe I don't hang with the "plays clandestinely" crowd. But my younger friends all talk about gaming, casually, like talking about popular TV shows. And my older friends mostly don't play video games.
The younger ones do- I'm not disputing that. It's the ones roughly my age (mid-40s) who I don't doubt play video games to some degree, but who don't talk about it, who I'm talking about.
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Old 12-31-2019, 02:41 PM
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My guess is that we run in different crowds. I really can't imagine one of my friends being shy about that. And i have at least one friend who is about fifty who often talks about his gaming when other gamers are around.
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Old 12-31-2019, 03:30 PM
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I think what also contributes to the smaller amount of people discussing games during small talk is even the most popular games don't tend to have as much of a centralized role in the zeitgeist as the most popular films, TV shows, and sports teams.

There is a low fiscal entry point for games (many games are available for only a couple bucks, most movies are going to run you $4 to rent, over $12 to see in a theater, or you can save money through streaming services, but then you're limited to what they are offering). And with the shear number of games out there, there are a lot of games that only one or two people in a given social group would have played.

Sure, you could say the same for movies and TV, but they get more press, I've never seen Breaking Bad or Orange is the New Black, but I can certainly contribute in some way to a conversation about them, even if not by much. I can't say the same for Minecraft, which I've never played, and that is one of the largest played games out there.

Also, gaming has not entered mainstream celebrity culture to the level of other media. There are plenty of A-listers involved in the gaming industry, e.g. Kristen Bell. But when most people think of Kristen Bell, I don't think Assassin's Creed is their first thought.

So I'd say it's not so much stigma, but the fact that gaming as part of the zeitgeist is a relatively recent thing when compared to other forms of media.
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Old 12-31-2019, 03:37 PM
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My guess is that we run in different crowds. I really can't imagine one of my friends being shy about that. And i have at least one friend who is about fifty who often talks about his gaming when other gamers are around.
Maybe it's just an age thing; it could be that even though the median age of a male gamer is something like 32, it still is centered roughly around there, and the tail up around 45 and above is relatively thin compared to the under-35 crowd.

Thinking about it, video games weren't quite as much of a thing for my age group in college as they were for my brother's (he's 40, I'm 47), as when I was in school, there was NO online gaming- it was in-person or singleplayer. So it wasn't a social activity like it is nowadays for a lot of people. I mean, back then you pretty much played by yourself, or you played with multiple controllers on a Genesis/Super Nintendo. You had to be more dedicated I suppose.

So maybe it's just that in the 45-50 crowd, there just aren't that many gamers?
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Old 12-31-2019, 04:11 PM
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I'm actually hoping to learn some of those skills, and wondered if there are any suitable "entry level" games. Like MS bundled mines and some solitaire game with the first windows os that required you to use a mouse, to train users on the mouse.
Games usually incorporate a tutorial on how to use the controller into the game itself. By the time you get to the more complicated stuff, youíre well practiced. I assure you that you donít need special skills to play games these days.

And, Iíll concur with the sentiment that these are a new art form. Games these days are like interactive movies. In fact, not only are they fun to play, they are fun to watch somebody play.

Iím 41, by the way, and Iíd consider it typical for a person my age to have a video game system.
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Old 12-31-2019, 06:58 PM
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I'm actually hoping to learn some of those skills, and wondered if there are any suitable "entry level" games. Like MS bundled mines and some solitaire game with the first windows os that required you to use a mouse, to train users on the mouse.
Fortnite is pretty simple as shooters go and has a 'playground mode' where you can run around, shoot, build, etc. without enemies (and with friends, if you want).
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Old 12-31-2019, 08:15 PM
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To start playing with some of those skills, You can try out some older but awesome releases. For example, Iwould suggest Borderlands 2. It's in a genre it invented called a looter shooter. But it is one of my favorite games all time, and uses all the conventions of modern shooters, but filters them through arcady action and forgives a lot of missteps to let you keep running and gunning, and that makes it a lot of fun. The enemies are great and one of the most hate-able bosses to keep you driving to take his miserable ass down.

It is build for totally solo if you feel like it, or you can group with friends, but no required masses of internet jackasses to make you hate the world. And is very cheap these days. 5 bucks for the basic game on Steam now, so not too much invested if you hate it.
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Old 12-31-2019, 11:35 PM
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Let's be honest, though. At some point in your life, you start losing a bit of the coordination, time and patience necessary to complete Dark Souls or Cuphead.
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Old 12-31-2019, 11:48 PM
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i consider those games a special case ..... I mean sure cupheads supposed ot be a nes type of shooter ....but they left out everything that a nes/bullet-hell shooter would have like in level power ups and such ... same thing for the run & gun lvls ....
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Old 01-01-2020, 09:35 AM
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Let's be honest, though. At some point in your life
If we're being really honest, many of us never had that level of coordination and patience in the first place.
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Old 01-01-2020, 11:47 AM
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I'm 46, and in my experience I seem to be right on the dividing line where gaming is acceptable. I don't think anyone I know that is older than me is a gamer, but most of my friends and coworkers my age and younger are, or at least don't think you're weird for being a gamer. Although I'm specifically excluding casual mobile games, which seem to "not count". Even my parents play Candy Crush.

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Originally Posted by puzzlegal View Post
I'm actually hoping to learn some of those skills, and wondered if there are any suitable "entry level" games. Like MS bundled mines and some solitaire game with the first windows os that required you to use a mouse, to train users on the mouse.
If you're interested in story-driven games, maybe RPGs would be your thing? They are also usually very good at easing new players into the game because you typically start out with only a very small subset of features, abilities, and areas available, which are gradually unlocked as you level up your character and advance through the story.

If you're new to the genre, I can recommend Final Fantasy XIV in particular. The player community is pretty friendly and accommodating to new players, with many who are eager to help. The combat system does not require fast-twitch reflexes because each ability has a short cooldown (2.5 seconds for most common attacks), so fights have a sort of rhythm or flow to them, rather than a bunch of wild button-mashing. The big enemy attacks also usually have a long wind-up that telegraphs itself with an area drawn on the ground for a good few seconds, giving you time to prepare. FFXIV is also a very story-driven game, and IMHO the story is better than most.

If you want to try out a shooter, then Fortnite is a good place to start. As mentioned upthread it's a fairly simple game, but more importantly it's also free to play, so you can try it out without any risk.
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Old 01-01-2020, 12:27 PM
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Thanks! I enjoy table-top RPG, so that's probably a good fit. I will look into FFXIV.
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Old 01-01-2020, 01:00 PM
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Another thing, FFXIV also has a free trial that allows you to play up to a certain level (30-35, IIRC) if you just want to test it out.
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Old 01-02-2020, 01:26 PM
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I am 58 and am a hard core gamer to the very end. Been playing games all my life. Both kids are also gamers as well, but my daughter has slowly moved onto other hobbies at this point in her life. Son is a chip off the ole block. I will game until I can't anymore as it is rooted deep within me (along with a hardcore love of sports). I wear my gaming love like a giant badge of honor. If others frown upon it, that's their loss.

Any steam gamers around here? Always looking for new gamers to play co-op and multiplayer games with.
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Old 01-02-2020, 02:31 PM
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I don't see the stigma in groups that I run with or people that I work with, and I think it's dying off. There certainly is a meme floating around that 'video games are for children', but it doesn't seem to have that much attraction, and the people who stick to it seem to be very traditional-minded and not the sort I'd be welcome to openly hang around with.

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Every other time a group of men roughly my age get together, the talk seems to always track with sports, food, booze, movies, etc... but not video games. I'm sure plenty of them do play video games, but nobody talks about it. Maybe it's a self-imposed stigma, or maybe it's larger than that- I dont' know.
I'm 45 and this isn't my experience at all. OTOH, when I do hang out with a bunch of guys my age, it's almost always people who do tech work or that I know through physical gaming, as I don't seek out just a group of 'guys approximately my age' as a social circle (and I have to use 'my age' pretty broadly). Most of the time I'm hanging out in groups with varied genders and varied ages so don't have that specific of a focus, and even in those groups there are plenty of guys 45 and up who play games or like talking about them. And generally games are a more popular topic than sports.

I think the groups you're hanging out with are groups that tend to select against gamers and go for more of the 'traditional man' stereotype.
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Old 01-02-2020, 03:48 PM
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I'm 45 and this isn't my experience at all. OTOH, when I do hang out with a bunch of guys my age, it's almost always people who do tech work or that I know through physical gaming, as I don't seek out just a group of 'guys approximately my age' as a social circle (and I have to use 'my age' pretty broadly). Most of the time I'm hanging out in groups with varied genders and varied ages so don't have that specific of a focus, and even in those groups there are plenty of guys 45 and up who play games or like talking about them. And generally games are a more popular topic than sports.

I think the groups you're hanging out with are groups that tend to select against gamers and go for more of the 'traditional man' stereotype.
Could be... although I work in tech as well, and I've found that most of the older tech guys still aren't gamers- lots of home brewers, sci-fi geeks and anime fans though. I think they're just not gamers.

A lot of what I'm getting at is relatively random men I deal with- Cub Scout dads and my kids' school's Dad's Club. One guy is a gamer and we've actually talked about it a fair bit, but most of it is not about gaming- lots of sports and traditionally macho stuff though.
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Old 01-02-2020, 03:50 PM
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Around here, playing video games as an adult is more the norm than not. I wasn't aware there was any stigma attached to it at all.
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Old 01-02-2020, 04:20 PM
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Around here, playing video games as an adult is more the norm than not. I wasn't aware there was any stigma attached to it at all.
I agree. It's a multi-billion dollar industry. Hardly anything childish about that.
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Old 01-02-2020, 04:47 PM
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Are you ever "too old" for video games?
Well my mother sure thinks so...

Though I will say that I think bump is onto something here. Not necessarily stigma, but more reticent to bring it up. I am 39 and have one friend in his 40s and we talk about Switch games. I don't really talk about gaming too much with other people. I know one guy who is in his 20s who likes PC gaming. Most of my other friends don't seem to game or don't really care to talk about it.

There is a lot more "Have you seen the new (show)" than "Have you played (game)".
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Old 01-03-2020, 07:51 AM
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Well my mother sure thinks so...

Though I will say that I think bump is onto something here. Not necessarily stigma, but more reticent to bring it up. I am 39 and have one friend in his 40s and we talk about Switch games. I don't really talk about gaming too much with other people. I know one guy who is in his 20s who likes PC gaming. Most of my other friends don't seem to game or don't really care to talk about it.

There is a lot more "Have you seen the new (show)" than "Have you played (game)".
That's really what I'm getting at. It's not like it would have been had my Dad gone at 47 years old in 1992 and said "Yeah, I play video games." (he didn't, but that's beside the point)

Back then, that would have been viewed as something less than manly/less than grown up in a way that being a computer enthusiast at the same time wouldn't have been.

Today, nobody is going to look at me funny for saying that I play video games, even people 5-10 years older than me. But it's not brought up, or a common topic of conversation at all, unlike sports, TV (broadcast, cable and streamed), movies, local news or even the weather.

It could be a lingering stigma, it could be just lower numbers of gamers in my age cohort, or it could be Hoopy Frood's cultural zeitgeist concept- I'm not sure.

Last edited by bump; 01-03-2020 at 07:52 AM.
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Old 01-03-2020, 07:56 AM
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I'm 46, and in my experience I seem to be right on the dividing line where gaming is acceptable.
Thought I posted this previously in this thread, but maybe it was "eaten".

I'm 48 and I would tend to agree with you. Probably has something to do with the fact that our age demographic are the first to grow up with videogames, starting with Pong, Pac Man and all the other classic arcade games. People a bit older never really got into videogames as a kid. So what tends to happen is as new styles of games or new platforms come out, people our age tend to "grow out" of videogames instead of exploring the new ones.

I think there is still a bit of a "stigma" though. At least how it is portrayed in the media. Like whether it's Thor in Avengers Endgame, Joaquin Phoenix's character in Her, or Vince Vaughn in any number of his films, adult characters playing videogames are often portrayed as having too much time on their hands, lacking real-world social connections, or escaping from their real-world problems. They are typically shown playing against some unseen obnoxious child, with whom they often engage in juvenile behavior such as smack-talking and name calling.
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Old 01-03-2020, 08:39 AM
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Today, nobody is going to look at me funny for saying that I play video games, even people 5-10 years older than me. But it's not brought up, or a common topic of conversation at all, unlike sports, TV (broadcast, cable and streamed), movies, local news or even the weather.
I guess? But it seems to fall under the category of hobby than a general topic of conversation, and people don't really bring hobbies up in casual conversation. Sports are a little different and even there, that's more an American thing - sports in casual conversation don't happen the same way in other countries, if they happen at all.

Turns out several of my friends and co-workers are into a wide variety of things, like competitive shooting or crochet or carpentry or marathon running or whatever. Those just don't come up in casual conversation and wouldn't if there hadn't been several opportunities to get more familiar with them.

I put gaming in that same boat - it's not something everybody can be assumed to do or have an interest in as a hobby so it doesn't come up very often. It's not really to do with a stigma or even an unusual reticence but just recognition that it's not polite to get into conversations on hobbies without knowing if the other person has any interest in it. I, for one, have nothing against crochet, but I would be bored to tears (and have been in the past) if I had to listen politely to somebody discuss crochet at length.

And likewise, I have a close group of friends, a subgroup of which might talk about gaming. But there are others in that group that don't, and you can see their eyes glaze over when it comes up. Everybody has their hobbies, and they're not always interesting to other people.

Last edited by Great Antibob; 01-03-2020 at 08:42 AM.
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