Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-18-2020, 03:18 AM
actualliberalnotoneofthose is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,602

I want to become an NHL hockey fanatic ASAP and know nothing about it


I know next to nothing about hockey. NHL is really the only major pro sport I haven't followed my whole life and I haven't followed it at all. I know nothing about the game. Probably because where I grew up it was sort of a rare rich kid's sport and I was a latchkey kid with a basketball hoop and a yard and could always round up enough guys for pickup games of football, basketball, and baseball. or even go to the park and play tennis. Pop Warner, and Little League, and multiple basketball leagues were a heavy presence. Even lacrosse was more common as the local college was a powerhouse, though no local schools offered it. Hockey was like, girl's field hockey.

Anyway, I find myself interested in the sport and the NHL in particular. I have a favorite team. But I know nothing. How do I learn about NHL and the sport and go from knowing nothing to being a fanatic who can follow and participate in conversations, watch games, and know what is going on? Where would you start?
  #2  
Old 01-18-2020, 04:23 AM
Leaffan's Avatar
Leaffan is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 25,185
Go to YouTube and search for Peter Puck. It's a series of very basic instructional short cartoons that explains the very basics of the game.

Now some of the rules have been tweaked over the decades since these cartoons were made, but the overall game is mostly the same.

Once you understand the basic fundamentals you really just need to start watching some games.

Here's part one of the series: https://youtu.be/JwbhCJDxOVY

Look for the next parts and enjoy. Again, these are from the 1970s but it's a starting point.

Last edited by Leaffan; 01-18-2020 at 04:24 AM.
  #3  
Old 01-18-2020, 04:31 AM
russian heel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,981
https://www.google.com/search?q=open...&client=safari

A good quick read. Hockey is not a complicated sport. The players and the culture are and Plimpton while antiquated is a great starters guide.

As for choosing a team to root for let us know where you live in the US or Canada and we can steer you in the right direction!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  #4  
Old 01-18-2020, 07:49 AM
RickJay is offline
Charter Jays Fan
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Oakville, Canada
Posts: 42,667
Quote:
Originally Posted by actualliberalnotoneofthose View Post
How do I learn about NHL and the sport and go from knowing nothing to being a fanatic who can follow and participate in conversations, watch games, and know what is going on? Where would you start?
Watch games with a friend who knows the sport.

If you have any specific questions by all means ask them here, but really, find a friend who knows you want to learn the game, sit down, and watch the games. No sport can really be understood with words on a page or screen; that is only a supplement to watching (or, ideally, playing.)
__________________
Providing useless posts since 1999!
  #5  
Old 01-18-2020, 02:05 PM
Hampshire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 11,239
Iíd think the easiest way to learn is to just dive into it and watch a broadcast game. Every time an announcer or ref throws out a term you donít understand just google it to get your answer. Forechecking, back checking, dump & chase, the neutral zone, the crease, delay of game, icing, pulling the goalie on a delayed penalty, carrying into the zone, stretch pass, breakaway, etc.
After you get a feel for the game and what the players are trying to do you end up watching the players move around instead of the puck.
  #6  
Old 01-19-2020, 03:47 AM
Harrington is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 195
Learn to spot an off-sides, and announce it before the referee calls it. Your peers will think you're a hockey genius.
  #7  
Old 01-19-2020, 07:50 AM
Leaffan's Avatar
Leaffan is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 25,185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrington View Post
Learn to spot an off-sides, and announce it before the referee calls it. Your peers will think you're a hockey genius.
Linesmen call the offsides
  #8  
Old 01-19-2020, 09:18 AM
Bijou Drains is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 11,281
Much better live in person. If you don't have a local NHL team check out the AHL it is the highest minor league and many of them will make the NHL.

Other leagues like the ECHL are cheap to see but the level of play is much lower but they still have fighting which is pretty much gone at the AHL/NHL level. Very few of the ECHL guys make the NHL.
  #9  
Old 01-19-2020, 09:24 AM
Bijou Drains is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 11,281
Also college hockey is good to watch. Junior hockey is mainly in Canada but there are some US teams, those are guys from 16-20 and the top guys there will likely make the NHL.
  #10  
Old 01-19-2020, 11:22 AM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
I was in the same boat as the OP about 20 years ago, though I only knew one person who was a hockey fan (my wife's stepfather).

I'd watch some games with him, and ask him questions. I also bought a "Hockey for Dummies" book, and read through it, then referred to it while watching games.
  #11  
Old 01-19-2020, 01:04 PM
Harrington is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Linesmen call the offsides
Of course. I was generically using the term "referee."

Last edited by Harrington; 01-19-2020 at 01:05 PM.
  #12  
Old 01-19-2020, 01:07 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 28,993
If you’re a gamer, get the latest NHL 20xx game and play with all the rules on.
  #13  
Old 01-19-2020, 01:25 PM
dalej42 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 16,111
I’d listen to the Puck Podcast, it’s long but covers every NHL team.

The first few minutes are friendly banter among the hosts and you can skip past that if you like.
__________________
Twitter:@Stardales IG:@Dalej42 He/Him/His

Last edited by dalej42; 01-19-2020 at 01:25 PM.
  #14  
Old 01-19-2020, 01:53 PM
wolfpup's Avatar
wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 11,538
Watching a live NHL hockey game in an arena is great fun if you live in an area where good seats are possible to get, but it's not at all a good way of learning the game for the first time. Watching on TV gives you the play-by-play and color commentary that helps you understand what's going on, plus generally a much better view, especially with the advent of big HD TVs. I haven't seen the material that Leaffan suggested but it may be a good start; watching the game on TV with a friend who can explain what's going on is also an excellent idea.

Once you have a basic understanding of the game you may want to browse through the official NHL rule book. It's a daunting 229 pages but you definitely don't need to read it all -- just use it for reference. Basic hockey rules are really pretty simple and many of the rules are obscure and rarely used. Despite the apparently simple rules, hockey strategies can sometimes get pretty intricate and that's something you will come to understand with time. But the basics of the game can be summarized in one sentence: shoot the puck into the net without going offside, and without committing an offense that will earn you a penalty. Minor penalties deprive a team of a player for two minutes of game time and give the opposing team a power play, which is a marginally increased opportunity to score.

Hockey is one of the fastest sports in the world and IMHO, the most exciting sport there is. It's so incredibly energetic that in pro NHL games most skaters -- not counting the goalies -- typically stay on the ice for only a matter of minutes before they change. It demands all-out total energy. Which is also why as a general rule -- but there are frequent exceptions -- the same teams do not play on consecutive nights.
  #15  
Old 01-19-2020, 02:02 PM
OldGuy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Very east of Foggybog, WI
Posts: 5,597
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
It's so incredibly energetic that in pro NHL games most skaters -- not counting the goalies -- typically stay on the ice for only a matter of minutes before they change.
not even a single minute typically. The average shift lenght is around 45 seconds. I used to play pick up hockey with about 2 minute shifts. That was brutal at age 40.
  #16  
Old 01-19-2020, 02:05 PM
Bijou Drains is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 11,281
also all the equipment they wear make you hot/sweaty pretty fast. I speak from experience , I played roller hockey and wore the same equipment except roller instead of ice skates.
  #17  
Old 01-19-2020, 02:27 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
Hockey is one of the fastest sports in the world and IMHO, the most exciting sport there is. It's so incredibly energetic that in pro NHL games most skaters -- not counting the goalies -- typically stay on the ice for only a matter of minutes before they change. It demands all-out total energy. Which is also why as a general rule -- but there are frequent exceptions -- the same teams do not play on consecutive nights.
This is something that, before I started really learning about hockey, I didn't really understand. When you watch a hockey game on TV, you often don't get a chance to actually see the shift changes happen, as the TV camera follows the puck, and teams usually try to change their shifts when the puck is in their opponents' end of the ice.

If you get a chance to watch a game in-person, one can see the changes in action, and it's pretty impressive.
  #18  
Old 01-19-2020, 04:23 PM
Hampshire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 11,239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Linesmen call the offsides
Sure, but if you can call one that the linesmen miss that results in a goal before the coach challenges it your friends would be pretty impressed.
  #19  
Old 01-19-2020, 04:54 PM
Leaffan's Avatar
Leaffan is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 25,185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
Sure, but if you can call one that the linesmen miss that results in a goal before the coach challenges it your friends would be pretty impressed.
Quite true. It's usually only by inches.
  #20  
Old 01-19-2020, 07:45 PM
wolfpup's Avatar
wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 11,538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
This is something that, before I started really learning about hockey, I didn't really understand. When you watch a hockey game on TV, you often don't get a chance to actually see the shift changes happen, as the TV camera follows the puck, and teams usually try to change their shifts when the puck is in their opponents' end of the ice.

If you get a chance to watch a game in-person, one can see the changes in action, and it's pretty impressive.
What's even more impressive is watching a live NHL game down close to the ice. It's not an opportunity I've often had, since it's essentially impossible to get Leafs tickets except from overpriced scalpers, but due to some friends who are NHL officials and some season seat-holders I've been given tickets to seats close to the ice and the energy is so fanatical that it's frightening, and you're thankful that you're protected by the glass. My first impression was that "this is not like it looks on TV, at all!"
  #21  
Old 01-19-2020, 08:36 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard's Avatar
Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 11,788
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
What's even more impressive is watching a live NHL game down close to the ice. It's not an opportunity I've often had, since it's essentially impossible to get Leafs tickets except from overpriced scalpers, but due to some friends who are NHL officials and some season seat-holders I've been given tickets to seats close to the ice and the energy is so fanatical that it's frightening, and you're thankful that you're protected by the glass. My first impression was that "this is not like it looks on TV, at all!"
I actually sat right next to the backup goalie at an NHL game. There was no glass in front of me. Kept thinking I was going to get a stick or a puck in the teeth.


mmm
  #22  
Old 01-19-2020, 08:46 PM
pulykamell is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 49,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldGuy View Post
not even a single minute typically. The average shift lenght is around 45 seconds. I used to play pick up hockey with about 2 minute shifts. That was brutal at age 40.
I was about to say "a matter of minutes"? Not even. 47 seconds in the 2018-2019 season. If you've ever done interval training, you can appreciate what a brutal level of athleticism that is.
  #23  
Old 01-19-2020, 08:51 PM
kayT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,400
I do think you need to go to games as often as you can. I never really understood the game until I went to a few LA Kings games. It's true you need to watch on TV too, but you need the live experience for sure. We have an AHL team here and they are a lot of fun to watch. It's also very fun to see a player you liked get his chance with the "big" team (Dallas Stars: Roope Hintz. We knew him when.)

Also, bear in mind that they change the rules every off season so don't be surprised when you start watching in the spring and things are suddenly different. I've been a big fan for 25 years and the way overtime is done, for example, has changed several times.

Last edited by kayT; 01-19-2020 at 08:53 PM.
  #24  
Old 01-19-2020, 11:40 PM
Hampshire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 11,239
I usually get to a handful of Wild games each season. A couple years back we got seats right behind the home team bench behind the glass. Was definitely an interesting viewpoint (looking at the back of Boudreauís bald head all game) of the game watching line changes, the constant sliding down the bench, how the coaches adjusted the line cards, how they communicated to the players, etc.
But after being so used to watching games on TV or from higher up I couldnít make a lot of sense of what was going on. Itís a whole different game at eye level.
  #25  
Old 01-20-2020, 02:36 PM
wolfpup's Avatar
wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 11,538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayT View Post
Also, bear in mind that they change the rules every off season so don't be surprised when you start watching in the spring and things are suddenly different. I've been a big fan for 25 years and the way overtime is done, for example, has changed several times.
Most of the changes are relatively minor, but yeah, the latest overtime change was a biggie. FTR, many regular-season games in the past ended in a tie, with each team being awarded one point in the standings. If the game was tied after three periods, it went into a five-minute sudden-death overtime with four skaters on the ice for each team instead of five, and if there was still no score, that was it, and the game was deemed a tie. Now, after overtime it proceeds to a shootout, where each team assigns three of their best players to each go individually one-on-one against the opposing goalie, with the home team having the first pick. Usually at least one player will manage to score, but if not, the process is repeated with a different player selection until someone scores, which doesn't usually take long. One caveat here is that although one team is declared the winner and earns two points, there are some limitations that I mention below.

Some fans really dislike the shootout overtime rule but I find it exciting. The objection to it is that it puts too much emphasis on the special skills of specific individual players and the teams' goalies rather than on the capabilities of the team as a whole. While there's some truth to that, most teams have a few great players that really make a huge difference, and some have been able get away with relatively crappy players and a great goalie who constantly saves their asses. That's just the way it is, whatever the rules may be.

Shootout goals don't count for an individual player's statistics or a goalie's save average, and they are assessed separately from wins in determining playoff standings, and carry lower weight in the event of a tie in the standings. So in some sense they are not a "real" win despite the winning team being awarded the points, but they make for really exciting hockey. Each shootout attempt is like a single-player breakaway where there is no one in the way and it's just the skater, stickhandling like mad, against a lone goalie. Nevertheless, points are points, and winning a lot of shootouts may get one team into the playoffs while another may be left out.

One of my pet peeves about hockey, though, is that so many teams make it into the playoffs that it doesn't have the same import that it does in baseball. There are currently 31 teams in the NHL (until recently it was 30) and more than half -- 16 -- get into the playoffs every year. Furthermore, unlike baseball, even the initial rounds are all best-of-7 series. I'm fine with it since I enjoy hockey, but I can see people who dislike the game considering the playoffs to be interminable. They literally go on until around mid-June. Someone seems to have forgotten that hockey is a traditional cold-weather winter game, historically played on frozen outdoor rinks. Try that in June and you're going to need a bathing suit, not ice skates. That's also true for any time of the year due to Gary Bettman's fixation on expansion in the US south, where there isn't enormous interest in hockey precisely because of its cold-weather roots, so a lot of kids don't get familiar with it.
  #26  
Old 01-20-2020, 03:24 PM
dalej42 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 16,111
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
Most of the changes are relatively minor, but yeah, the latest overtime change was a biggie. FTR, many regular-season games in the past ended in a tie, with each team being awarded one point in the standings. If the game was tied after three periods, it went into a five-minute sudden-death overtime with four skaters on the ice for each team instead of five, and if there was still no score, that was it, and the game was deemed a tie. Now, after overtime it proceeds to a shootout, where each team assigns three of their best players to each go individually one-on-one against the opposing goalie, with the home team having the first pick. Usually at least one player will manage to score, but if not, the process is repeated with a different player selection until someone scores, which doesn't usually take long. One caveat here is that although one team is declared the winner and earns two points, there are some limitations that I mention below.

Some fans really dislike the shootout overtime rule but I find it exciting. The objection to it is that it puts too much emphasis on the special skills of specific individual players and the teams' goalies rather than on the capabilities of the team as a whole. While there's some truth to that, most teams have a few great players that really make a huge difference, and some have been able get away with relatively crappy players and a great goalie who constantly saves their asses. That's just the way it is, whatever the rules may be.

Shootout goals don't count for an individual player's statistics or a goalie's save average, and they are assessed separately from wins in determining playoff standings, and carry lower weight in the event of a tie in the standings. So in some sense they are not a "real" win despite the winning team being awarded the points, but they make for really exciting hockey. Each shootout attempt is like a single-player breakaway where there is no one in the way and it's just the skater, stickhandling like mad, against a lone goalie. Nevertheless, points are points, and winning a lot of shootouts may get one team into the playoffs while another may be left out.

One of my pet peeves about hockey, though, is that so many teams make it into the playoffs that it doesn't have the same import that it does in baseball. There are currently 31 teams in the NHL (until recently it was 30) and more than half -- 16 -- get into the playoffs every year. Furthermore, unlike baseball, even the initial rounds are all best-of-7 series. I'm fine with it since I enjoy hockey, but I can see people who dislike the game considering the playoffs to be interminable. They literally go on until around mid-June. Someone seems to have forgotten that hockey is a traditional cold-weather winter game, historically played on frozen outdoor rinks. Try that in June and you're going to need a bathing suit, not ice skates. That's also true for any time of the year due to Gary Bettman's fixation on expansion in the US south, where there isn't enormous interest in hockey precisely because of its cold-weather roots, so a lot of kids don't get familiar with it.
I hate the shootout and 4 on 4 and 3 on 3. Iíll take a 10 minute OT 5 on 5 sudden death and then Iím fine with a tie.
__________________
Twitter:@Stardales IG:@Dalej42 He/Him/His
  #27  
Old 01-20-2020, 04:54 PM
wolfpup's Avatar
wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 11,538
The problem is that, as fast and exciting as it is, hockey is a relatively low-scoring game -- which indeed is part of the excitement, since each goal is precious and may literally be the game-changer. So your proposed 10-minute 5-on-5 OT is likely to result in no change in the score -- which has been a very common outcome during 4-on-4 OTs -- although both teams would likely have themselves revved up to playoff-level energies during that OT. Total game scores like 1-0 or 2-1 are very common, and indeed, to quote what someone wrote on a sports site recently, "In the NHL, there have been 41 games tied 0-0 after overtime since the introduction of the shootout in 2005 (meaning they would have been recorded as a 0-0 tie in the past), which is 0.25% of games. And there have been 189 0-0 ties in history (dating back to 1924)."

I disagree with Bettman on most things but in this case he's trying to make hockey an even more exciting game, and while I somewhat sympathize with the reasons that many fans dislike shootouts, in this case I think he succeeded.

This is a bit of a digression about the OP's request to learn about hockey -- again, I think the best advice is to watch games with a friend who can explain what's going on, and then refer to the rule book I cited for full details. But I think this brief digression about how OT is handled is instructive in itself about how that aspect of the game is played.
  #28  
Old 01-20-2020, 05:44 PM
Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 21,150
Live games are great, but to start, I agree with those who recommend watching the game on TV (you'll get familiar with the game's terminology from the commentators), and with a friend who knows and can explain the game in more detail as situations arise.

One complaint many new fans have is that they either cannot see, or have difficulty following, the puck on TV. Not surprising; the puck is small and it often moves fast. Experience will allow you to see the puck eventually, but if you have trouble at first, watch the players. They will be going after the puck, and if you pay attention to what the players are paying attention to, you'll find it.
  #29  
Old 01-20-2020, 06:47 PM
RickJay is offline
Charter Jays Fan
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Oakville, Canada
Posts: 42,667
I'll tell you this; it's easier to see the puck now, with 1080p TV and up being the norm, than it used to be on tube TVs.
__________________
Providing useless posts since 1999!
  #30  
Old 01-21-2020, 10:03 AM
Bijou Drains is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 11,281
3 on 3 is too much different from the regular game. I'm OK with 4 on 4 but they should think about doing it for 10 minutes for less shootouts.
  #31  
Old 01-21-2020, 04:38 PM
Fleetwood's Avatar
Fleetwood is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: NH-US
Posts: 1,060
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
One of my pet peeves about hockey, though, is that so many teams make it into the playoffs that it doesn't have the same import that it does in baseball. There are currently 31 teams in the NHL (until recently it was 30) and more than half -- 16 -- get into the playoffs every year.
The NHL has usually been top-heavy in playoff teams. Presently, the NHL eliminates more teams than they used to. When the playoffs were expanded to 16 teams, there were 21 total in the league. Each division eliminated 1 team (except 1 eliminated two teams).
  #32  
Old 01-21-2020, 05:30 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 17,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleetwood View Post
Presently, the NHL eliminates more teams than they used to. When the playoffs were expanded to 16 teams, there were 21 total in the league. Each division eliminated 1 team (except 1 eliminated two teams).
I remember those days well -- a team needed to to be really lousy to be one of the five that didn't make the playoffs.
  #33  
Old 01-23-2020, 03:44 PM
Quercus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: temperate forest
Posts: 7,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijou Drains View Post
Also college hockey is good to watch. Junior hockey is mainly in Canada but there are some US teams, those are guys from 16-20 and the top guys there will likely make the NHL.
I also recommend this. Live hockey is a totally different experience, and live college hockey is equally fun or maybe more so than NHL (assuming you don't mind being surrounded by college kids). Ideally, there's a school around that's good enough to have passionate crowds but still has available and reasonable tickets. If you can find some tenuous connection to the school (your neighbor's aunt went there!) so you can cheer hard for them, even better.
  #34  
Old 01-23-2020, 09:17 PM
wolfpup's Avatar
wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 11,538
I still opt for the TV option, with a friend explaining things to you.

Another thing to mention about live games is that every single NHL club has a farm team, sometimes in the same city, sometimes far away. I think every farm team is part of the AHL, and many of those players are just one step away from the NHL. Tickets are cheap and if there's no NHL team but a farm team nearby it's relatively easy to get to see a pro game that is much like an NHL game.

Every once in a while I get a "special offer" from the Leafs office of a few Leafs tickets offered only to those on the season seat waiting list (I've been on it for about 20 years, expecting no progress), but that package always includes a whole bundle of the expensive class of Marlies tickers (the Leafs farm team) that you also must purchase as a precondition. I've never done it because the total was always outrageous and most of it was for Marlies games that my son has no particular interest in, as exciting as they may be for people who just want to see good hockey.
  #35  
Old 01-25-2020, 01:40 PM
ThisSpaceForRent's Avatar
ThisSpaceForRent is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: University City, MO
Posts: 1,652
I had never seen a hockey game prior to 1986. I married a gal whose three brother all played. We had two boys together. They both started playing about age 5. Early morning and late night practice and many many kid hockey games got me up to speed. Been a diehard St Louis fan since the early 90's... I got to see us hoist the cup (on TV) with my oldest son last June, he is now 32.

Short answer...Have kids that play and pay attention, learn it with them, you will also gain a lifetime of memories!!

tsfr
  #36  
Old 01-25-2020, 03:36 PM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Rural Western PA
Posts: 34,305
My gf's ex-husband played, so she has watched many games, some alongside players/coaches. She really knows the game, I'm just along for the ride.

We were watching a Penquins game at a bar, when she pointed out some sort of strategic error. A guy loudly disagreed with her. Then, during a stoppage of play, one of the commentators white boarded what had just happened and explained exactly what she had said.

My gf got some respect, even more when she brushed it off by telling us the commentator was a personal friend and the error was a pet peeve of his.

As for instant cred, can you do a Canuck accent? Yell, "get it oot!" during a power play, for example.
  #37  
Old 01-25-2020, 07:36 PM
Guinastasia's Avatar
Guinastasia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 53,141
Hey, here's a hockey fan who'd LOVE to attend a game but doesn't have the money -- anyone willing to extend some charity to a fellow fan?

Seriously though, those tickets are EXPENSIVE.

Last edited by Guinastasia; 01-25-2020 at 07:37 PM.
  #38  
Old 01-25-2020, 08:15 PM
Guest-starring: Id!'s Avatar
Guest-starring: Id! is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 4,758
OP: Just watch the green circle and red shot trajectory graphic, and if Mike Milbury comes on between periods, change the channel.
  #39  
Old 01-26-2020, 06:54 AM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Rural Western PA
Posts: 34,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guinastasia View Post
Hey, here's a hockey fan who'd LOVE to attend a game but doesn't have the money -- anyone willing to extend some charity to a fellow fan?

Seriously though, those tickets are EXPENSIVE.
No kidding. We attend a Pens game every other year or so, but they're always gifted tix.

I miss the old civic arena. The new place seems so generic, plus the damn roof doesn't open!
  #40  
Old 02-01-2020, 08:38 PM
russian heel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,981
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
I usually get to a handful of Wild games each season. A couple years back we got seats right behind the home team bench behind the glass. Was definitely an interesting viewpoint (looking at the back of Boudreau’s bald head all game) of the game watching line changes, the constant sliding down the bench, how the coaches adjusted the line cards, how they communicated to the players, etc.

But after being so used to watching games on TV or from higher up I couldn’t make a lot of sense of what was going on. It’s a whole different game at eye level.

I go to 1-2 AHL games a year and while all that is fun about sitting behind the glass the glass itself obscures action in the corners. I really prefer 10-15 rows up.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  #41  
Old 02-03-2020, 09:31 AM
MeanJoe is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 2,359
I think this primer is really all you need to know.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XbL7lG0Su8

"You do dat', you go to the box 2 minutes by yourself, and you feel shame you know. Then you get free."
__________________
Father to sassy girls. Husband to a mad wife. And I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next.
  #42  
Old 02-04-2020, 05:21 PM
CC is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: not elsewhere
Posts: 4,439
One thing you might appreciate early on is the fact that the teams, while all not championship level, are all good enough to beat other teams on any given night. You will hardly ever see a blowout like you can see in the other sports. And there's almost no moments when there's "nothing" happening. Watch one player for a while and marvel at how quickly he makes decisions. Put yourself in his spot and see if you can imagine where he's going to pass the puck, for example - especially in play against the boards. You'll be surprised and amazed at what they can see and do in the flash of an instant. And if you get a chance, watch Patrick Kane of the Blackhawks. You will be amazed at how he manages to keep the puck on his stick, even when he's moving backward. It's a game of incredible skill that's played at breakneck speed and with amazing finesse. Give it a chance and you'll be hooked.
  #43  
Old 02-04-2020, 05:55 PM
Guinastasia's Avatar
Guinastasia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 53,141
Just out of curiousity, what team ARE you rooting for?
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:00 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017