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  #101  
Old 04-02-2017, 04:47 PM
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This is really a blindspot for me, but I honestly don't understand how some Canadians get unbelievably protective of our political leaders. Mock them. They are not angels, nor are they demons. And as much as they smile and try to emotionally manipulate you into identifying AS THEM, THEY ARE NOT YOU.

Trudeau, in particular, is an PM that is bred and image sculpted into an acceptable left-wing devil-may-care Pierre jr, saviour of Canada. He's not half the free-spirited, intellectual, and political batsman as his father. He's a smile in a coat. And, frankly, most Canadians are satisfied with that (for now).

Last edited by orcenio; 04-02-2017 at 04:51 PM.
  #102  
Old 04-03-2017, 06:43 AM
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Thank goodness I don't live there. Any country that has a leader that sings the praises of a murdering dictator such as Fidel Castro is not a strong leader, nor a moral one. I hope the Canucks who voted him into office are happy with that left-wing extremist.
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/trump...ry?id=41936057
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...er-very-smart/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b00642712cab32

Yes, clearly you care an awful lot about praising murdering dictators.
  #103  
Old 04-03-2017, 08:12 AM
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Matthew Perry says he once beat up Justin Trudeau in elementary school; the PM's ready for a rematch: http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/02/entert...tch/index.html
  #104  
Old 04-03-2017, 08:13 AM
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Trudeau challenges Matthew Perry to rematch. I love it. That's one of the things I like about Trudeau, he's willing to say things that normally a politician might not say, like in this example challenging somebody to a 'fight'. While mainly being pretty mature, diplomatic and thoughtful. In other words, I love stuff like this so long as it is occasional.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/02/entert...inkId=36112054
  #105  
Old 04-03-2017, 10:19 AM
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Let's not forget this one.
  #106  
Old 04-03-2017, 01:14 PM
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No, Canadians aren't stupid...we simply make our choice and stick with it until 1. they piss us off and 2. the government in waiting appears ready.
That seems like it is pretty accurate to me. However, it does seem like the voters of Ontario are really, really slow to piss off.
  #107  
Old 04-03-2017, 02:42 PM
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I see a distinct lack of "attemped but failed" in that list. That makes me suspicious of the "broken" tally. There is a difference between breaking a promise and not being able to fulfill it.
Canada has four major parties, one of them the Quebec Bloc, plays spoiler to get their way.

To point, why make a promise if you know it can't happen?
  #108  
Old 04-03-2017, 05:10 PM
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Canada has four major parties, one of them the Quebec Bloc, plays spoiler to get their way.

To point, why make a promise if you know it can't happen?
The Bloc Qubcois got 4.7% of the vote last election, and won 10 seats. While in the distant past, they may have been able to play "spoiler", they currently have no political power whatsoever, and play no real part in anything that happens outside of a few ridings in Quebec. Even in Quebec, the BQ won less than 20% of the vote.

In short, the BQ are a spent force.
  #109  
Old 04-04-2017, 05:19 PM
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Plus, Trudeau has an absolute majority in the Commons, so the opposition parties can't stop a government measure. It's up to Trudeau and the internal dynamics of the Liberal Caucus what measures get introduced.
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  #110  
Old 04-04-2017, 05:19 PM
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Seriously?
O'Leary and Leitch are still the Conservative front-runners? Glad that they're slipping in popularity - they need to slip more. Or hyperspace out of the situation completely. When Leitch praised Trump's election win, that sealed it for me.
Bernier? Scheer? Chong? I don't know much about them - hoping they'd at least be a better choice than the first two.
Too bad SK and negono aren't still around for me to respond to. (or - too bad I came late to the party)
  #111  
Old 04-05-2017, 09:56 AM
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Canadians don't care mostly, not just the liberal ones. As that CNN article notes Canadians make up the majority of Cubas tourists and we've had unbbroken diplomatic relations since 1945. And Canadians probably universally don't give a crap about Rubio and Cruz's reaction. Just like they will promptly forget Trudeau's name a week from now.
That's the funny bit.
  #112  
Old 04-11-2017, 11:46 AM
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Canada has four major parties, one of them the Quebec Bloc, plays spoiler to get their way.

To point, why make a promise if you know it can't happen?
Well, you can hope your promises will shift enough of the voters your way to make it possible. If you start by assuming you'll never be able to do anything after an election, what's the point of contesting it in the first place?
  #113  
Old 04-11-2017, 01:01 PM
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Trudeau isn't a leader, but an entitled name/smile. Nonetheless most Canadians are (and will continue to be) satisfied with his tepid governance. This will change when/if the Tories get a well respected leader and the Libs get bogged down in scandal.
Which will be, at the earliest, the election after the next one. You can bet on it.

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But the former Tory leader Steven Harper has a legacy, too -- the guy who was kicked out of power and then ignominiously slunk away from politics altogether
Harper was Prime Minister for nine years and won three elections, which puts him ahead of most people who've held the job. When his time was up, he left. That isn't a "slunk," it's the respectable (and, frankly, sane) thing to do.

Someday they'll name an airport after him, too; wistfully reminiscing about Pierre Trudeau because they named an airport after him is... uhh... it's kind of silly, I'm sorry to tell you. Trudeau was widely despised when he was Prime Minister, just as much as Harper ever was. When he resigned in 1984 it's because the people were turning on him, an electoral catastrophe was looming, and he decided to jump before he was pushed. There are people who STILL hate him. But in time, the general consensus mellows out. Eventually, I assure you they will name a big airport after Stephen Harper - probably the one in Calgary, which, conveniently, doesn't have a person's name attached to it yet.

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Originally Posted by BeepKillBeep
I'm willing to cut him some slack on the 1st year deficit because I think Harper was overestimating income to make the books look more balanced.
This doesn't make any sense, I'm sorry. Trudeau and his party knew precisely what the numbers actually were. The government's revenue and expenditures are not a secret, and economic forecasts are known to everyone. There is nothing about the nature of the deficit that could possibly be taken as surprising.

The reason he deficit is rapidly climbing is really very simple; the government is spending way more money. The last Conservative budget called for $289 billion in spending. The next budget raised that to $319 billion, and the one after than $330 billion. That's a 14 percent increase in two years, even thought the economy could not possibly grow that fast, so of course there's a deficit.
  #114  
Old 04-11-2017, 02:11 PM
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Which will be, at the earliest, the election after the next one. You can bet on it.
Looking at the polls today and that seems like a safe bet, but remember the next election is 2.5 years away. No one can predict the political landscape during this time. Its possible for Tory support to rebound under a strong inspiring leader who delivers a clear vision of Canada, all the while the Libs are floundering under a smiling Justin with a dearth of new ideas.

Of course 'possible' means very little, anything is possible. Trudeau is riding high in the polls and has trounced all comers; there's no reason to expect otherwise in the future. Of course...stranger things have happened in recent Canadian politics.

Last edited by orcenio; 04-11-2017 at 02:13 PM.
  #115  
Old 04-11-2017, 03:07 PM
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Looking at the polls today and that seems like a safe bet, but remember the next election is 2.5 years away.
Every single new government in our nation's history was re-elected, except in a few cases where they were defeated by the same party led by the same person who had previously been Prime Minister - Alexander Mackenzie was re-replaced by MacDonald, Bennett was re-replaced by King, and Joe Clark was a hiccup in Trudeau's reign. A new party leader has never unseated a government after its first mandate.

None of the Tory frontrunners suggest to be the sort of remarkably inspiring candidate who could change that. Leitch will drive red Tories like me away, O'Leary is a clown who will not compare well to the disaster that Trump will obviously be by then, and the rest are boring.

Last edited by RickJay; 04-11-2017 at 03:09 PM.
  #116  
Old 04-11-2017, 04:17 PM
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Yes, seeing Leitch and O'Leary play the populism/one-up-man-ship/camera chasing game for constant media coverage is disheartening.

My advice is to not write off the boring ones. A dark horse winner might be able to successfully drum up controversy, champion wedge issues, while also projecting the image of a seasoned, intellectual, and competent politician. Haven't seen it yet, but I haven't been closely looking either.
  #117  
Old 04-11-2017, 04:21 PM
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Bernier.

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  #118  
Old 04-11-2017, 04:43 PM
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Oh yes Bernier. MAXIME Bernier. He's a guy like ourselves, and well known. He has my confidence. Yep, with him, we'll march forward! We should all vote for Bernier. MAXIME Bernier!

Last edited by orcenio; 04-11-2017 at 04:45 PM.
  #119  
Old 04-11-2017, 05:14 PM
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I was eating out today and saw something about parliamentary reform flash by the screen. I can't find anything about it on the news. Did anybody hear anything about this?
  #120  
Old 04-11-2017, 05:44 PM
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Did you try Google? It's not hard to find as this has been covered by all of the major media outlets for weeks now. Here's one story about the proposal.
  #121  
Old 04-11-2017, 05:45 PM
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I was eating out today and saw something about parliamentary reform flash by the screen. I can't find anything about it on the news. Did anybody hear anything about this?
I think it was "In other news, parliamentary reform is still dead."

But seriously, it might have been about the U.K. plan to reduce the number of seats in Parliament.
  #122  
Old 04-11-2017, 05:52 PM
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Did you try Google? It's not hard to find as this has been covered by all of the major media outlets for weeks now. Here's one story about the proposal.
Did you notice that this story was in March and it is now April?

I was wondering what, if anything, was updated. CarnalK could be right maybe what I saw flash by was about the UK parliament.

Last edited by BeepKillBeep; 04-11-2017 at 05:53 PM.
  #123  
Old 04-11-2017, 05:56 PM
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Here's a more recent story if you like
  #124  
Old 04-11-2017, 06:09 PM
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Which I've already read but thanks.
  #125  
Old 04-11-2017, 06:40 PM
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Harper was Prime Minister for nine years and won three elections, which puts him ahead of most people who've held the job. When his time was up, he left. That isn't a "slunk," it's the respectable (and, frankly, sane) thing to do.

Someday they'll name an airport after him, too; wistfully reminiscing about Pierre Trudeau because they named an airport after him is... uhh... it's kind of silly, I'm sorry to tell you. Trudeau was widely despised when he was Prime Minister, just as much as Harper ever was. When he resigned in 1984 it's because the people were turning on him, an electoral catastrophe was looming, and he decided to jump before he was pushed. There are people who STILL hate him. But in time, the general consensus mellows out. Eventually, I assure you they will name a big airport after Stephen Harper - probably the one in Calgary, which, conveniently, doesn't have a person's name attached to it yet.
Calgarian officials can name an airport after anyone, but it would be a shame to waste it on Harper, no? It's just a little over a year after the end of his government but I think it's safe to say that he leaves an extremely thin legacy. At least, nothing compared to Pierre Trudeau.

Both the Official Languages Act (1969) and Canadian Multiculturalism Act (1971) continue to be key in how Canada thinks of itself as a bilingual and multicultural society. Trudeau's government also gave us the Constitution Act (1982) which patriated us from the British Parliament and gave us our Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. His hard line stance of Canadian nationalism in the face of FLQ terrorism and the Quebec sovereignty movement is now culturally iconic.

OTOH Justin Trudeau rode to power almost completely on the promises to reverse Harper's unilateral/divisive policy changes. The only lasting policy (of which I can remember) is Harper's 2% GST cut. Also PET only got his airport after he died and his legacy was undeniable.

Last edited by orcenio; 04-11-2017 at 06:45 PM.
  #126  
Old 04-12-2017, 11:33 AM
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Calgarian officials can name an airport after anyone, but it would be a shame to waste it on Harper, no? It's just a little over a year after the end of his government but I think it's safe to say that he leaves an extremely thin legacy. At least, nothing compared to Pierre Trudeau.
Sure, but eventually it's just "this guy was Prime Minister for awhile." Few national leaders ever really stand out for a lgeacy, and half of the time it's myth. Trudeau of course accomplished a lot.
  #127  
Old 02-20-2019, 03:40 PM
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Nae sa guid: Canadians -explain the SNC -Lavalin Affair

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  #128  
Old 02-23-2019, 10:32 AM
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Trudeau government is dropping in the polls; Scheer and the Conservatives now have a slight lead:

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The Trudeau government is leaking political support in the wake of the resignation of its former justice minister, making its chances of re-election this fall far less certain than they seemed to be at year’s end, according to a new poll provided exclusively to Global News.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s personal approval ratings are down; a declining number of Canadians think his government deserves re-election; and Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives narrowly lead the Liberals on the ballot box question.
Trudeau government leaks support in wake of SNC-Lavalin, Wilson-Raybould matter: Ipsos poll
  #129  
Old 02-23-2019, 02:30 PM
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All the more amazing since Andrew Scheer is a useless dumbass.
  #130  
Old 02-23-2019, 05:13 PM
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Why do you say that?
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  #131  
Old 02-23-2019, 06:04 PM
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Why do you say that?
I suspect we're going to disagree on this, and perhaps you're of a conservative persuasion or perhaps influenced by the fact that Scheer is from Saskatchewan. Nor do I want to digress the discussion too much on this. But I was surprised at his leadership win since he seemed like a lightweight, but beyond that, there's a reason he's known as Harper 2.0. That reason includes his positions on climate change and the carbon tax, anti-abortion, Harperesque "tough on crime" advocacy, and American-style free-market libertarianism that marks him as a Blue Tory, in the unpleasant tradition of the likes of Mike Harris and Doug Ford.
  #132  
Old 02-24-2019, 06:55 PM
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I suspect we're going to disagree on this, and perhaps you're of a conservative persuasion or perhaps influenced by the fact that Scheer is from Saskatchewan. Nor do I want to digress the discussion too much on this. But I was surprised at his leadership win since he seemed like a lightweight, but beyond that, there's a reason he's known as Harper 2.0. That reason includes his positions on climate change and the carbon tax, anti-abortion, Harperesque "tough on crime" advocacy, and American-style free-market libertarianism that marks him as a Blue Tory, in the unpleasant tradition of the likes of Mike Harris and Doug Ford.
This. But I would argue he has less personality than Stephen Harper.

Seriously, he's about as exciting as a 2x4 plank of pine.

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  #133  
Old 02-28-2019, 01:09 AM
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After today's testimony, the answer to the OP is staring into an an abyss.
  #134  
Old 02-28-2019, 09:45 AM
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After the Conservatives and the National comPost have been beating the "WE HATE TRUDEAU AND SO SHOULD YOU!" horse for the past year,

I'm afraid that most Canadians, instead of being incensed that Trudeau exerted pressure on one of his own, will be simply numb to the 964th accusation that Trudeau is EEEEVILLLL.

It's pretty obvious to me that Scheer is using tactics from the previous election down south;
- be as divisive as possible - pit one part of the country (Alberta) against the others
- blame the other party (LIberals) for the divisiveness on both sides
- attack you opponent with anything and everything. Throw every accusation at him you can think of, no matter how stupid. Every day, get another story out.
- use your media friends (National comPost), to amplify your message Every day
- use social media trolls to amplify your message. Get them to post in EVERY. SINGLE. ARTICLE.about how Trudeau is EEEVIL, even if it's about a local cat being rescued from a tree.
  #135  
Old 02-28-2019, 11:00 AM
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This. But I would argue he has less personality than Stephen Harper.

Seriously, he's about as exciting as a 2x4 plank of pine.

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Less personality than Harper, and as exciting as a 2x4. That's hilarious. We elected a guy with personality and nice hair and look what it got us, a PM with room temperature IQ.
And didn't Trudeau tell us, a woman must always be believed?

Could this latest scandal turn into Canada's own WATERGATE?
  #136  
Old 02-28-2019, 04:22 PM
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Well I read Jody Wilson-Raybould's testimony and honestly I'm ok with the fact that discussions around "finding a solution" took place prior to SNC going to court to contest the DPP decision. I would fully expect an AG to have to shut down non lawyers/political staffers when it comes to decisions where a cabinet minister can exert authority on rulings.

However once she explicitly stated that she would not due to a court case (mid-October) that was when it had to stop. Obviously it didn't, the pressure continued and she was turfed for not bending.

In my view this type of behaviour needs punishment if for no other reason than to raise a big blinking sign to the political class that working within the law is the goal, not working around it.
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  #137  
Old 02-28-2019, 04:24 PM
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Could this latest scandal turn into Canada's own WATERGATE?
Uh...no. You must be new to Canadian scandals.
As for the relative merits of the 2 leaders, I have yet to read or hear anything from Scheer that displays an intelligence, consideration or moral center in excess of what we currently have.
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  #138  
Old 03-01-2019, 11:25 AM
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Here's the BBC's latest summary: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47408239
  #139  
Old 03-01-2019, 04:50 PM
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Uh...no. You must be new to Canadian scandals.
As for the relative merits of the 2 leaders, I have yet to read or hear anything from Scheer that displays an intelligence, consideration or moral center in excess of what we currently have.
Personally, I don't give about Scheer right now. This isn't about him, it's about our current PM that has fully crossed the line when it comes to ethics.
Trudeau appointed JW-R and numerous others because she checked the right boxes, native Indian and female. He didn't realize she was not a JW-Rman, but rather someone with ethics, something that he is sorely lacking.
When the time comes to vote for someone more competent than Trudeau, I'll concern myself with the choices.
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Old 03-01-2019, 04:59 PM
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Uh...no. You must be new to Canadian scandals.
As for the relative merits of the 2 leaders, I have yet to read or hear anything from Scheer that displays an intelligence, consideration or moral center in excess of what we currently have.
...she was not a yes-man, but rather...

Seems auto-correct is too quick.

Last edited by bb49; 03-01-2019 at 05:02 PM.
  #141  
Old 03-01-2019, 05:54 PM
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... it's about our current PM that has fully crossed the line when it comes to ethics.

... When the time comes to vote for someone more competent than Trudeau, I'll concern myself with the choices.
Why not wait for all the facts to come out and make a balanced judgment? I think it's fairly clear that Trudeau was concerned about the impact on a Quebec company that just happened to be one of the world's largest engineering firms, including the potential impact on Quebec jobs. I'm not saying what he did was right (or wrong) as I don't know what he did, and neither does anyone else outside the circle of people directly involved. I do think his concern about SNC-Lavalin was genuine and a well-intentioned political calculation. It's not like he tried to protect them because he was a major shareholder or something. Was it less ethical than the US bailout of AIG?

And I don't see how this reflects on Trudeau's "competence".

As for Scheer, as I noted before, Scheer is just another version of Harper, with many of the same beliefs but less political skill. Which is pretty scary. The only good thing about Scheer is that, as with Trump, one can only hope that if his party wins the next election, the incompetence will mitigate the actual enactment of his lunatic beliefs -- which is not exactly an inspiring picture of leadership.
  #142  
Old 03-01-2019, 06:31 PM
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Wow. It's really amazing how we all see what we want through our own filters.
  #143  
Old 03-01-2019, 06:47 PM
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I've been clear and frank since his election that I've been largely supportive of Trudeau, so I'm biased to that extent, though I don't by any means agree with everything he does. But I'm curious what you think is so remarkably "filtered" by statements like "Why not wait for all the facts to come out?" and "I'm not saying what he did was right (or wrong) as I don't know what he did"?

I can assure you that if he can be shown to have pressured the AG to do something illegal, I won't be defending him.
  #144  
Old 03-01-2019, 07:22 PM
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It's your comments on Prime Minister Harper, who I believe is the best Prime Minister in my lifetime.
  #145  
Old 03-01-2019, 10:57 PM
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I agree.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:23 PM
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I would disagree and offer Jen Chretien simply on his ability to impose sufficient restraint to move Canada into surplus, survive a referendum and impose new criteria around any subsequent ones. Martin lacked time, and Harper was agreeable until he allowed the base to impose a removal of the census and impose restrictions on government scientific staff. Trudeau is fine except for his difficulty threading ClimateChange/Pipelines and this effort to influence his AG/Justice Minister.
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  #147  
Old 03-01-2019, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
Why not wait for all the facts to come out and make a balanced judgment?
I'm not necessarily a fan of Mr. Trudeau's, but I think that this is the approach that ought to be taken. Right now, all we have are hints that Mr. Trudeau and/or his staff somehow acted inappropriately, but we don't know for sure. In other words, we have one side of the story. Further investigation into all sides is necessary to know exactly what happened.

Note that I'm not necessarily a fan of Mr. Scheer's; neither am I one of Mr. Singh's fans. (I'm one of the Great Undecided.) Given that, I do think that Mr. Scheer was a little early in calling for Mr. Trudeau's resignation. Nothing has been proven to show that Mr. Trudeau was the equivalent of a Mr. Big, whose minions would do his bidding without question, and who consequently should resign. Rather, we have allegations, many based on hearsay.

JWR gave us a lot to be looked into. We should look into it.
  #148  
Old 03-02-2019, 01:04 AM
Dr_Paprika is offline
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I think Harper was a decent prime minister, and underrated. Although some of his decisions seemed strange to me (census, treatment of science) these arent the biggest issues.

Scheer seems like hes still deciding whether to be a nice guy or use more American tactics.

I have some familiarity with Trudeau and a few of his senior advisors. I know them to be smart, dedicated and generally ethical people. On one hand, the SNC Lavalin scandal seems like a storm in a teacup. The national media cant be that surprised that bribery and black markets exist in many countries or that many Quebec (and Maritime) firms have a lot of influence. I dont think Trudeau handled this well. And in the end being ethical and stubborn seems to have cost JLR her position, which is clearly wrong. But Im not sure it justifies the first eight pages of the Globe either. I hope that the final result is that JLRs old position gets divided into two different jobs and a way to offer more independence and more practical legislation.
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  #149  
Old 03-02-2019, 12:45 PM
Northern Piper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
Why not wait for all the facts to come out and make a balanced judgment? I think it's fairly clear that Trudeau was concerned about the impact on a Quebec company that just happened to be one of the world's largest engineering firms, including the potential impact on Quebec jobs. I'm not saying what he did was right (or wrong) as I don't know what he did, and neither does anyone else outside the circle of people directly involved. I do think his concern about SNC-Lavalin was genuine and a well-intentioned political calculation. It's not like he tried to protect them because he was a major shareholder or something. Was it less ethical than the US bailout of AIG?

And I don't see how this reflects on Trudeau's "competence".
While I agree that we need to have the full story, there's a few things that jump out for me.

First, there's the general principle that just because you're the Prime Minister, that doesn't give you the legal authority to tell your Cabinet ministers how to exercise their statutory duties. That principle was established by the Supreme Court sixty years ago in the landmark constitutional case of Roncarelli v Duplessis (yes, that Duplessis).

Second, that principle applies at its strongest in the area of prosecutions. One of the most important principles of our system of government is that decisions about criminal prosecutions are not based on political considerations. It's the duty of the Attorney General to protect that principle. Ms Wilson-Raybould, a former Crown prosecutor, appears to have been well-aware of her duty in this regard. But doesn't that carry a corresponding duty on her Cabinet colleagues to respect her duty to make independent decisions?

Third, the provision in the Criminal Code that authorizes these deferred prosecution agreement expressly states that the consent of the Attorney General is required to sign off on the agreement. That's a statutory duty for the AG, not for anyone else.

Fourth, the Code also provides that when the charge relates to the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act, the Crown Prosecutor is prohibited from taking into account any impact that the case may have on Canada's national economy, i.e. jobs.

Fifth, the Code provision also expressly prohibits the Crown prosecutor from taking into account the identity of the accused organization - which suggests as soon as someone says "But it's SNC-Lavalin we're talking about!" they're asking the decision-maker to take into account something they're not supposed to consider.

All told, that's a lot of red flags here. Sure, it's good not to rush to judgment, but at some point as citizens we have to decide if what the PM and his staff did shows competence and respect for the rule of law. I guess we'll all have to think about it when we go into the ballot booth this fall.
  #150  
Old 03-02-2019, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Paprika View Post
. The national media cant be that surprised that bribery and black markets exist in many countries or that many Quebec (and Maritime) firms have a lot of influence.
1. Yes, there's corruption in foreign countries. And our elected representatives, in Parliament assembled, passed the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act, which makes it a criminal offence in Canada for Canadian companies to bribe officials in foreign countries. And Parliament also said that if a company commits that crime, they're barred from federal contracts for ten year.

So is the federal Public Prosecutions Service supposed to ignore those strong directives from Parliament, and say to a Canadian company, "Och, we know you didn't really mean it, and it's all those foreigners who have corrupt business practices.How else are you supposed to compete? We'll go easy on you."

If the federal government doesn't want companies to be punished for foreign bribes, then repeal the Act. That's a clear policy choice. But don't have the Act with force of law and then say "Whoops, we don't really mean it!" That undermines respect for both law and government.

2. So Quebec and Maritime firms have lots of political influence and the government goes easy on them when they're caught with their hands in the cookie jar, because the current government has lots of MPs from those areas. But if a western firm also gets caught with its hand in the cookie jar, and almost all of the MPs from the area are on the Opposition side, so the government doesn't intervene to go easy on the western firm? What does that say about corruption, not in foreign countries, but right here in Canada?
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