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Old 03-20-2019, 12:31 PM
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What's left after making clotted cream?


So I recently learned that making clotted cream is insanely easy. Which sucks because for years I'd been paying $6 for a tiny jar of the stuff. What I'm wondering is, what is contained in the leftover liquid?

The process is simple. You take a quart or two of heavy whipping cream and pour them into a large flat glass pan. I use a pyrex lasagna pan. Then you put that into the oven at about 130F or whatever the lowest temperature is: in my case 170F. Leave it there for 12 hours, then take it out, cool a bit, cover, and put it into the fridge for twelve more hours.

When it's done you'll have approximately half each of thick clotted cream, and a white liquid. The clotted cream is the consistency of butter, and tastes like whipped cream. I'm guessing it is almost entirely milk fat.

The remaining liquid is thick and creamy, with a slightly caramel flavor to it. It's fantastic for making pancakes and biscuits with. But what is it? It's as thick as if it were still heavy cream, but of course most (if not all) of the milk fat is gone. I assume that most of the water has cooked out as well, thus the reason it is still so thick.

What, besides milkfat, is in the cream to begin with? And what is in this concentrated leftover liquid?
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Old 03-20-2019, 01:11 PM
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Whey Protein?
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Old 03-20-2019, 01:13 PM
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If I'm understanding the process correctly, I think what you have left is buttermilk.
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Old 03-20-2019, 01:16 PM
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Lactose is a sugar that is probably partially caramelized. Most cooked milk products get a little brown and carmel flavored.
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Old 03-20-2019, 04:46 PM
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It definitely does not taste like butter milk, but then it wouldn't be fermented as most buttermilks are. I have to say, the end product is so much like butter in consistency, and so much better tasting, that I'm left wondering why anyone ever churned the stuff at all.

Heavy cream is purported to be nearly zero lactose.That's why I started using it, because Celtling was intolerant, so I just used watered down cream instead of milk until Fairlife came out.

I've had liquid whey that was separated from milk by spinning; it was quite watery. But then this would have been concentrated, so maybe?
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Old 03-20-2019, 05:33 PM
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It's slightly concentrated and caramelized whey.

If you start with a lot of whey instead of cream, and add in a bit of cream for fat and flavor, you can make Norwegian brown cheese instead:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brunost
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Old 03-20-2019, 05:37 PM
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I'm always delighted to have the chance to share this article about the dangers of brunost.
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Old 03-20-2019, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susan View Post
I'm always delighted to have the chance to share this article about the dangers of brunost.
It's no more dangerous than molasses:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Molasses_Flood
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Old 03-20-2019, 08:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susan View Post
I'm always delighted to have the chance to share this article about the dangers of brunost.
quote from that article:
Quote:
The fire raged for five days and smouldering toxic gases were slowing the recovery operation
There's toxic gases coming off the cheese? What do they put in that stuff?
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Old 03-21-2019, 09:06 AM
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I just made this last night. Clotted cream dish cooling in the fridge as we speak.

As to the question, isn't it basically the same thing as traditional buttermilk, just reduced until thick? And correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't traditional buttermilk (as opposed to the cultured/fermented kind) basically just skim milk, i.e., milk without the cream?
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Old 03-21-2019, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtilque View Post
quote from that article:


There's toxic gases coming off the cheese? What do they put in that stuff?
It's not what they put in it, it's what they put around it to transport it, such as plastic, trailers, trucks and road tunnels.
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Old 03-21-2019, 06:22 PM
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[Moderating]

Questions about food and cooking generally go in Cafe Society. Moving from GQ.
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Old 03-22-2019, 09:45 AM
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According to the Wikipedia article, the leftover liquid is skim milk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotted_cream

Quote:
As a by-product, for every 100 imperial gallons (450 l; 120 US gal) of milk used, 94 imperial gallons (430 l; 113 US gal) of skimmed milk is produced, which is then used in food manufacture
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