Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-02-2019, 01:52 PM
Busy Scissors is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The Euston Tavern
Posts: 2,828

Andy Ruiz Jr, Heavyweight champion of the World!


Huge upset in boxing last night - HW champion Anthony Joshua got turned over by a 11-1 underdog Andy Ruiz, 7th round TKO. Ruiz took the fight on 5 weeks notice when Joshua's original opponent dropped out with a failed drugs test.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7a22iw

Joshua was the consensus pick as the best HW fighter around, but he had his detractors (who are in full voice today) - very musclebound fighter who is prone to gassing out, not the best movement and questions over his chin. These flaws were front and centre last night, Ruiz got sat down himself in the third but came back and walloped AJ from pillar to post, put him down four times before the ref called it off in the seventh.
Absolute nadir performance from AJ - can't believe how bad he looked tbh. RUiz landed one of those shots to the temple in the third that don't look especially big, but just scramble the senses. Put AJ on queer st and he never really got over it.

Anyhow, all the talk will be Joshua this, Joshua that, but hail to the Champ (apparently the first Mexican HW champ in history) - Ruiz fought the fight of his life, showed huge heart to get up from a knockdown, and battered the overwhelming favourite. He also showed that boxing ain't a bodybuilding competition, as fair to say there was a dramatic contrast in physiques. Apparently they will rematch in the Autumn.
  #2  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:08 PM
pool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Inside
Posts: 4,393
As just a casual spectator who enjoys boxing but doesn't watch it all that much, I gotta say it gives me some joy when the ostensibly more out of shape, shorter (relatively) guy wins against the tall, chiseled, more athletic Adonis type of boxer.
__________________
"You can do anything you set your mind to...But money helps"

Last edited by pool; 06-02-2019 at 02:09 PM.
  #3  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:14 PM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
Joshua was the consensus pick for best heavyweight by promoters who were cashing in big on him. Everyone else saw him as a good fighter, well trained, but lacking significant experience. His only meaningful fight was against a 40 year old Wladimir Klitschko. He didn't do well in that fight until Klitschko tired late in the fight.

I didn't know much about Ruiz but I could see in round 1 that Joshua was in danger. Ruiz went down first, but it was obvious that he wasn't hurt, and that he got up more determined than before. With each or Ruiz's subsequent punches it was obvious that Joshua was in trouble. Joshua has been bragging 'bigly' of late, Ruiz shut his mount last night.

Congratulations Andy. Unfortunately for all of us there will be a rematch instead of Ruiz taking on Deontay Wilder to clear up who the real heavyweight champ is. Anyone paying attention just might think it's the guy with a 42-0-1 and 40 KOs record.
  #4  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:15 PM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by pool View Post
As just a casual spectator who enjoys boxing but doesn't watch it all that much, I gotta say it gives me some joy when the ostensibly more out of shape, shorter (relatively) guy wins against the tall, chiseled, more athletic Adonis type of boxer.
Last night showed that Ruiz was not at all out of shape in terms of conditioning. You just mean he was fat.
  #5  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:23 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 25,799
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ4P1ySqbLg

I watched the highlights and holy cow, Ruiz just destroyed Anthony Joshua. I noticed that Joshua kept dropping his head in as he punched tho, allowing Ruiz easy reach. And Joshua'd physically lower his upper body to be at the same head height as his opponent (so his punches were going straight in instead of down at an angle), which also put his face in easy reach of the shorter Ruiz.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 06-02-2019 at 02:24 PM.
  #6  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:27 PM
CastletonSnob is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 214
I'm shocked to find out that Ruiz beat Joshua last night. Why did Joshua lose? Was he not prepared, since Ruiz was a replacement for Miller, is Ruiz a bad style match-up for him, or is Joshua just not as good as advertised?
  #7  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:46 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 25,799
Watch the highlights I linked to... Joshua kept allowing his face into Ruiz's reach and Ruiz, once he saw that the could hit Joshua in the face AND he could rock him easily, became ferocious.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 06-02-2019 at 02:46 PM. Reason: face
  #8  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:55 PM
Busy Scissors is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The Euston Tavern
Posts: 2,828
Quote:
Originally Posted by CastletonSnob View Post
I'm shocked to find out that Ruiz beat Joshua last night. Why did Joshua lose? Was he not prepared, since Ruiz was a replacement for Miller, is Ruiz a bad style match-up for him, or is Joshua just not as good as advertised?
Probably all three of those things. What is worrying for AJ is that he can't say he just walked into a massive shot, as even the best chins can be folded at heavyweight level. It looked more like an attritional series of knockdowns where he was visibly wilting - both chin and heart massively in question after that.
  #9  
Old 06-02-2019, 03:02 PM
CastletonSnob is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Busy Scissors View Post
Probably all three of those things. What is worrying for AJ is that he can't say he just walked into a massive shot, as even the best chins can be folded at heavyweight level. It looked more like an attritional series of knockdowns where he was visibly wilting - both chin and heart massively in question after that.
I think Joshua might have a weak chin. He was dropped by an old Wlad, rocked by Whyte, and dropped and stopped by Ruiz.
  #10  
Old 06-02-2019, 03:10 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 25,799
https://apnews.com/58bd8bfe73d84482a2381ec3db2e359a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Joshua
It’s an upset, isn’t it? The bookies said I was a favorite. One shot on top of the dome kind of rattled me a bit. But the better man won. Respect to Andy. Now I move forward.
I thought that was a classy and proper quote from the loser of the contest.

But Ruiz had a couple of good ones too:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Ruiz, Jr.
Now they can say that they have the first Mexican heavyweight champion of the world. I’m just happy that it’s me.
and
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Ruiz, Jr.
Now that I have this time, I want to get in shape and look like a Mexican Anthony.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 06-02-2019 at 03:11 PM.
  #11  
Old 06-02-2019, 03:22 PM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
Ruiz went right after Joshua's body. That's why he was coming in head down, trying to extend his reach on the shorter man while keeping his body back. Just another sign of his lack of experience. He was also looking to throw bombs at Ruiz instead of using a real jab, that allowed Ruiz to move forward with impunity.

And yeah, the evidence is that Joshua's chin is suspect.
  #12  
Old 06-02-2019, 05:46 PM
asahi's Avatar
asahi is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: On your computer screen
Posts: 9,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ4P1ySqbLg

I watched the highlights and holy cow, Ruiz just destroyed Anthony Joshua. I noticed that Joshua kept dropping his head in as he punched tho, allowing Ruiz easy reach. And Joshua'd physically lower his upper body to be at the same head height as his opponent (so his punches were going straight in instead of down at an angle), which also put his face in easy reach of the shorter Ruiz.
The highlights I saw began with Joshua knocking Ruiz down and it seemed from his reaction that he was confident and trying to use the left to measure Ruiz and then throw the straight right, which caught Ruiz. The problem was that Joshua closed in on Ruiz, which also gave Ruiz his best chance of winning. Joshua closed in, but instead of finishing off Ruiz, he found out Ruiz wasn't that badly hurt and he got a taste of the big boy's power. I don't think Joshua expected Ruiz to fight back, and that's the difference between the competition that he faced and crushed in the UK and the kinds of fighters he's going to be facing from here on out. The top echelon fighters are tough guys who can bang. They're not going to just fold and become target practice for Joshua.

I don't think it was a terrible loss for Joshua, and quite possibly a good learning experience provided he has the mental toughness to put it behind him. Joshua has the physical tools to beat anybody. It's just a question of how he deals with this loss psychologically, and how he deals with getting hit and hurt again in future fights. If there's one bad thing that I saw in the fight it's that Joshua looked like he got fatigued pretty early. A good head shot will do that but I was surprised by how gassed he looked in the 3rd round

Last edited by asahi; 06-02-2019 at 05:50 PM.
  #13  
Old 06-02-2019, 07:01 PM
asahi's Avatar
asahi is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: On your computer screen
Posts: 9,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
Watch the highlights I linked to... Joshua kept allowing his face into Ruiz's reach and Ruiz, once he saw that the could hit Joshua in the face AND he could rock him easily, became ferocious.
Ruiz's bombs also came from some unusual angles.
  #14  
Old 06-03-2019, 08:58 AM
Fotheringay-Phipps is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,879
Quote:
Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
Last night showed that Ruiz was not at all out of shape in terms of conditioning. You just mean he was fat.
I was actually wondering about this. Ruiz had so much fat it literally rippled whenever he moved quickly. But he didn't seem to tire as the fight went on - to the contrary, it was the chiseled Joshua who lost it. So it looks like underneath the fat Ruiz probably was in good shape in terms of muscle, lung & heart capacity etc. He just happened to have a big layer of fat on top of it.

Question then is: in such a situation, does the fat have positive qualities to it along with the negative?

It has an obvious downside in that he would be dragging around extra weight which is not adding punching power or stamina. But on the other hand, I wonder if it served as "padding", which mitigated the impact of punches received to the body, which a guy with only muscle might not have.
  #15  
Old 06-03-2019, 09:25 AM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 31,782
Quote:
Originally Posted by asahi View Post
Ruiz's bombs also came from some unusual angles.
*BOOM* right in the ear. I watched some older fights where Ruiz rocked his opponents with the same punch.
  #16  
Old 06-03-2019, 09:25 AM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
I was actually wondering about this. Ruiz had so much fat it literally rippled whenever he moved quickly. But he didn't seem to tire as the fight went on - to the contrary, it was the chiseled Joshua who lost it. So it looks like underneath the fat Ruiz probably was in good shape in terms of muscle, lung & heart capacity etc. He just happened to have a big layer of fat on top of it.

Question then is: in such a situation, does the fat have positive qualities to it along with the negative?

It has an obvious downside in that he would be dragging around extra weight which is not adding punching power or stamina. But on the other hand, I wonder if it served as "padding", which mitigated the impact of punches received to the body, which a guy with only muscle might not have.
Extra weight does add some power to punches unless a fighter is just arm punching. Power comes from the rigidity of the entire body down to the balls of a fighter's feet, and the weight adds some momentum. But generally it's been detrimental to boxers because as you say, the rest of the time it's useless weight he has to drag around the ring.

I wonder about the padding effect, it could help to distribute the force of body punches. And some glancing body punches may not hit more than fat. It may also be indicative of a body type where he actually has much more muscle than someone like Joshua and the fat is disguising that.

Last edited by TriPolar; 06-03-2019 at 09:26 AM.
  #17  
Old 06-03-2019, 10:15 AM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
Turns out the upset was Drake's fault.
  #18  
Old 06-03-2019, 10:16 AM
Cheesesteak's Avatar
Cheesesteak is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Lovely Montclair, NJ
Posts: 13,367
From the clips, I liked Ruiz' ferocity when AJ was vulnerable. Quick recognition and a flurry of accurate and hard punches. Punches in bunches.
  #19  
Old 06-03-2019, 12:05 PM
Chefguy's Avatar
Chefguy is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 41,809
Another horizontal British champion.
  #20  
Old 06-03-2019, 12:21 PM
iiandyiiii's Avatar
iiandyiiii is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 34,199
Loved seeing the highlights and this result! In high school and college, I dabbled in boxing, culminating in my still-undefeated 1-0 amateur heavyweight record (it was really, really amateur...). And I looked a lot like Ruiz in body type and general fighting style.

As a side note, I have extremely mixed feelings about boxing in general due to the high likelihood (much higher even than American football, in my understanding) of traumatic brain injuries. It's a great sport -- maybe the all time great sport, in terms of the physical and mental demands of the competitors... not sure if any other sport demands the same combination of strength, stamina, power, agility, speed, toughness, and willpower. But I don't think most of these guys really understand the damage they're doing to their brain. Riddick Bowe is the ultimate cautionary tale, and stories like his are why I'll never box again nor allow my (future) kids to box.

Last edited by iiandyiiii; 06-03-2019 at 12:21 PM.
  #21  
Old 06-03-2019, 01:33 PM
asahi's Avatar
asahi is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: On your computer screen
Posts: 9,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
I was actually wondering about this. Ruiz had so much fat it literally rippled whenever he moved quickly. But he didn't seem to tire as the fight went on - to the contrary, it was the chiseled Joshua who lost it. So it looks like underneath the fat Ruiz probably was in good shape in terms of muscle, lung & heart capacity etc. He just happened to have a big layer of fat on top of it.

Question then is: in such a situation, does the fat have positive qualities to it along with the negative?

It has an obvious downside in that he would be dragging around extra weight which is not adding punching power or stamina. But on the other hand, I wonder if it served as "padding", which mitigated the impact of punches received to the body, which a guy with only muscle might not have.
I don't know whether this is actual sport science, but I remember watching some MMA analysts (ex-fighters) suggest that the really heavy guys who carry around a lot of muscle tire easily. Their muscles use up the oxygen more quickly.

Joshua's never been known to have serious problems with conditioning as I recall, so it's unusual that he would tire. But clearly, Joshua looked tired -- and he looked a lot more tired after he got rocked by Ruiz's right hand to the ear.

Tedd Atlas made the comment that getting hit behind the ear leads some fighters to appear punch drunk the rest of the fight. It can be a punch that fighters never fully recover from, as it screws with their equilibrium. That might have been what happened to Joshua.
  #22  
Old 06-03-2019, 01:40 PM
asahi's Avatar
asahi is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: On your computer screen
Posts: 9,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by iiandyiiii View Post
Loved seeing the highlights and this result! In high school and college, I dabbled in boxing, culminating in my still-undefeated 1-0 amateur heavyweight record (it was really, really amateur...). And I looked a lot like Ruiz in body type and general fighting style.

As a side note, I have extremely mixed feelings about boxing in general due to the high likelihood (much higher even than American football, in my understanding) of traumatic brain injuries. It's a great sport -- maybe the all time great sport, in terms of the physical and mental demands of the competitors... not sure if any other sport demands the same combination of strength, stamina, power, agility, speed, toughness, and willpower. But I don't think most of these guys really understand the damage they're doing to their brain. Riddick Bowe is the ultimate cautionary tale, and stories like his are why I'll never box again nor allow my (future) kids to box.
Boxing, especially if one makes a professional career out of it, is a brutal sport. I don't have the data to support it, but I'd wager that it's more dangerous than mixed martial arts. When a fighter gets rocked in MMA, the fight is usually over moments later. In boxing, they continue fighting. And those 10 oz gloves? They're actually more dangerous because they inflict more head trauma. The gloves weren't invented to protect the head; they were invented to protect knuckles and to prevent lacerations. In so doing, they made repetitive blows to the head much more damaging.
  #23  
Old 06-03-2019, 01:54 PM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
My observation is that head trauma in boxing is a problem for the most successful fighters as a result of the number of fights. Successful doesn't necessarily mean winning, there are perennial contenders as well. It's not simply the number of fights either, they can get hit a lot more in training than they will in real fights. There is a belief that wearing headgear in training makes the problem worse by allowing the fighters take a lot more shots to the head. Just as in football it's not just the major impacts that matter, it's the numerous smaller ones also, cumulatively worse because there's no indication of injury after each one.

I hope the sport can take a better look at the health of the boxers in terms of how many times they've been hit in the head and require more stringent examination before being allowed to fight. But not much will get in the way of a fighter determined to continue his career. There are a lot of boxing venues worldwide and eventually a boxer can find one that will let him fight.

ETA: I didn't catch the size of the gloves in this fight, but they didn't look like the 16 oz. gloves heavyweights traditionally used. That small amount of additional padding might help a little with the shots Ruiz throws to the side of the head (and he is really effective with those), but in terms of concussion it makes little if any difference.

Here's a number of Ruiz KOs that show that those shots to the side of the head are his specialty.

Last edited by TriPolar; 06-03-2019 at 01:59 PM.
  #24  
Old 06-03-2019, 04:29 PM
Busy Scissors is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The Euston Tavern
Posts: 2,828
Quote:
Originally Posted by asahi View Post
I don't know whether this is actual sport science, but I remember watching some MMA analysts (ex-fighters) suggest that the really heavy guys who carry around a lot of muscle tire easily. Their muscles use up the oxygen more quickly.

Joshua's never been known to have serious problems with conditioning as I recall, so it's unusual that he would tire. But clearly, Joshua looked tired -- and he looked a lot more tired after he got rocked by Ruiz's right hand to the ear.

Tedd Atlas made the comment that getting hit behind the ear leads some fighters to appear punch drunk the rest of the fight. It can be a punch that fighters never fully recover from, as it screws with their equilibrium. That might have been what happened to Joshua.
His stamina is questioned a lot (on boxing forums etc), but prior to Sat night it was perhaps not based on a great deal of evidence. I think the fact that heavily muscled boxers often aren't built for twelve like you mention, and then AJ did in fact gas out dramatically against WK mid rounds - this was the one data point people siezed upon to confirm what they thought they knew.

The Klitscho fight was a war, though, with v heavy exchanges - aside from that fight he hadn't manifested serious stamina issues, but it hadn't been tested much, either. This fight, though - something very wrong with him as he looked tired after round 2 and Ruiz was hardly forcing the pace. I think two fights with serious lapses in stamina are enough to say he does have issues in this department. (He definitely goes in heavy when he thinks he can finish someone, puts himself deep into the red zone that he can't quickly recover from)

That was a horrible, horrible loss though. I agree that a loss shouldn't be the end of the world, and can in some circumstances be a learning experience and turning point to greater things, but there's no positives to be taken here. He just got starched by Andy Ruiz in the absolute physical prime of his (AJ's) career.
  #25  
Old 06-06-2019, 12:43 PM
asahi's Avatar
asahi is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: On your computer screen
Posts: 9,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Busy Scissors View Post
His stamina is questioned a lot (on boxing forums etc), but prior to Sat night it was perhaps not based on a great deal of evidence. I think the fact that heavily muscled boxers often aren't built for twelve like you mention, and then AJ did in fact gas out dramatically against WK mid rounds - this was the one data point people siezed upon to confirm what they thought they knew.

The Klitscho fight was a war, though, with v heavy exchanges - aside from that fight he hadn't manifested serious stamina issues, but it hadn't been tested much, either. This fight, though - something very wrong with him as he looked tired after round 2 and Ruiz was hardly forcing the pace. I think two fights with serious lapses in stamina are enough to say he does have issues in this department. (He definitely goes in heavy when he thinks he can finish someone, puts himself deep into the red zone that he can't quickly recover from)

That was a horrible, horrible loss though. I agree that a loss shouldn't be the end of the world, and can in some circumstances be a learning experience and turning point to greater things, but there's no positives to be taken here. He just got starched by Andy Ruiz in the absolute physical prime of his (AJ's) career.
The more I analyze the fight, I don't think the loss is quite as horrible as it seemed at the time. It's obviously horrible in terms of how it affects Joshua's trajectory and it blew his payday, but it wasn't like Joshua was dominated from the opening bell. It seems that Joshua simply wasn't prepared for Ruiz's fighting style. Joshua is used to stalking his opponents and setting up his combinations, but Ruiz almost from the start, was the one moving around the ring and backing Joshua up. Joshua looked a little cautious and confused. He started measuring and timing Ruiz and landed a knockdown. His mistake was that he dropped his guard when trying to finish Ruiz off. He never recovered.

Last edited by asahi; 06-06-2019 at 12:43 PM.
  #26  
Old 06-06-2019, 01:53 PM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
It was just one fight. Joe Louis was badly beaten by Max Schmeling early in his career, didn't end his career. Lennox Lewis was knocked out by Oliver 'Cry Baby' McCall, didn't end his career. We'll see what happens with both of these guys.
  #27  
Old 06-06-2019, 01:55 PM
iiandyiiii's Avatar
iiandyiiii is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 34,199
Just one fight, but Ruiz's style seemed particularly well suited to Joshua. Ruiz will be training too, and likely will be in better shape for the rematch.
  #28  
Old 06-06-2019, 03:05 PM
Atamasama's Avatar
Atamasama is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by iiandyiiii View Post
Just one fight, but Ruiz's style seemed particularly well suited to Joshua. Ruiz will be training too, and likely will be in better shape for the rematch.
So, like paper beats rock? No matter how hard that rock is? Rock needs to be scissors for the rematch.
  #29  
Old 06-06-2019, 03:10 PM
iiandyiiii's Avatar
iiandyiiii is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 34,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
So, like paper beats rock? No matter how hard that rock is? Rock needs to be scissors for the rematch.
We'll find out!
__________________
My new novel Spindown
  #30  
Old 06-06-2019, 03:22 PM
Fotheringay-Phipps is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,879
On an unrelated note, I'd never heard of Ruiz prior to this fight but having seen some interviews and such since then, he comes off as a particularly likeable guy.
  #31  
Old 06-06-2019, 03:41 PM
TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 40,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
So, like paper beats rock? No matter how hard that rock is? Rock needs to be scissors for the rematch.
This could be it. The fighter who is best prepared to add something new to their game will have the advantage. But often in a rematch it just picks up where the previous fight left off. Not a good idea for Joshua.
  #32  
Old 06-06-2019, 05:09 PM
SacFly is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotheringay-Phipps View Post
On an unrelated note, I'd never heard of Ruiz prior to this fight but having seen some interviews and such since then, he comes off as a particularly likeable guy.
Not only that, but he started boxing when he was six, had a hundred amateur fights, and was 30-1 as a professional. I'm not saying he's Joe Frazier, but the guy had a serious boxing career. Whoever picked him as the replacement for the fight made a major mistake.

Ruiz showed a lot of heart and that he could take a punch. And he out-boxed the heavyweight champion of the world. It's a great story.

Last edited by SacFly; 06-06-2019 at 05:10 PM.
  #33  
Old 06-08-2019, 09:55 PM
asahi's Avatar
asahi is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: On your computer screen
Posts: 9,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
This could be it. The fighter who is best prepared to add something new to their game will have the advantage. But often in a rematch it just picks up where the previous fight left off. Not a good idea for Joshua.
It really depends.

Joshua is a really, really good boxer. He has a good technique and he clearly possesses knockout power. He was actually the first one to score a knockdown. You could tell he struggled to deal with Ruiz's style in the first couple of rounds, but he started to get a sense for timing and space and scored a knockdown in the 3rd. Sensing he had hurt Ruiz, Joshua instinctively, predictably went in close to Ruiz to try and finish the fight.

And that's where things went south. Ruiz was stunned but he wasn't hurt, and he just started swinging with fury. Ruiz has very, very good hand speed - no doubt deceptive due to his pudgy physique. Ruiz is also accurate, and once he tagged Joshua with the right to the ear, Joshua was screwed.

Joshua can learn from this fight. If Joshua weren't an accomplished Boxer, I wouldn't give him a chance, but he's a smart fighter. He can add things to his repertoire. It really depends on his mentality. Does Joshua have the tenacity and determination to come back from a loss like this? Does he have the mental toughness? We have no idea?

Last edited by asahi; 06-08-2019 at 09:55 PM.
  #34  
Old 06-08-2019, 10:39 PM
GIGObuster's Avatar
GIGObuster is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 28,822
Funny comment on that Youtube highlight video:

"I am canceling my gym membership and going out for some tacos."
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017