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Old 12-18-2019, 04:06 AM
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should the nfl and teams clamp down on these 10k or more "rookie dinners"?


Ok I know this isnt that big of a deal but every year you hear tales of the NFL team rookie dinner where the rookie(s) takes the whole team out to a dinner ........

Now sometime in thr 80s/90s when rooks started to get millions of guaranteed money to find the most expensive restaurant and take him/them to the cleaners and laugh about it saying " he just got 5 mil as a singing bonus which they get to keep even if they never play a game " and treated as a practical joke but then you get things like this ...https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl...tes/ar-BBY5oLf

I send a chef friend the above link and she said if they ate half of what was on the pic of the receipt people probably be physically ill

I think its time to clamp down on the practice be it coaches and gms all the way up yto the commish ...
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Old 12-18-2019, 08:40 AM
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Yes, the league and the teams should have a quiet chat with their veterans about stuff like this. I'm not for making it an explicit rule (free country after all), but their are plenty of ways for the league to clamp down on it without having to spell it out.

Having rookies pick up donuts during training camp is one thing. Or picking up their helmets after practice (though even this is fairly juvenile). Ridiculous dinners costing thousands of dollars is another thing altogether.

There are a lot of stories out there about players having no idea how to deal with regular life skills - like laundry or bills or whatever - and the league putting emphasis into classes and training for rookies on basic money management skills. That's simply mutually exclusive with some of them being forced to pick up the tab on wasteful, expensive meals whose primary purpose is to waste the money of a new player who should, instead, be encouraged, especially by their older more experienced teammates, to carefully consider their money management.
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Old 12-18-2019, 10:55 AM
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I don't know what they cover in the NFL money management classes, but there are a couple of things that they should cover.
  • NFL is an acronym. It means "Not For Long". The average career lasts three years. After that three years comes a period referred to as "the rest of your life".
  • If you weren't my friend before I had money, you ain't my friend now.
  • If everybody else jumped off the Brooklyn Bridge, would you?
The last one is a favorite of my mother's.

I am only personally familiar with one (retired) NFL player. I happen to know that he had a reputation among his team mates as a cheapskate. Meaning, in part, he didn't fall for this kind of thing. Of course, his father was a very successful businessman, so he was raised in an atmosphere where "easy come easy go" is the moral equivalent of a curse word, he did a college internship with an investment firm, and managing your money for the long term was assumed to be like putting your pants on in the morning - that's just how it is.

Most NFL players don't have that. All they ever focused on was playing football, and everything else was taken care of for them. Then suddenly, no one is taking care of anything for them.

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Old 12-18-2019, 10:57 AM
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The most egregious case of this was when Ryan Leaf was a rookie in 1998. His Chargers teammates, as the tale tells it, actually stole his credit card and bought themselves a $3,000 dinner with it.

Now, Leaf turned out to be an NFL bust in every sense, but that doesn't make this any fairer to him.

Last edited by Velocity; 12-18-2019 at 10:58 AM.
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:09 AM
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The most egregious case of this was when Ryan Leaf was a rookie in 1998. His Chargers teammates, as the tale tells it, actually stole his credit card and bought themselves a $3,000 dinner with it.

Now, Leaf turned out to be an NFL bust in every sense, but that doesn't make this any fairer to him.
He may have turned out to be a bust, but Ryan Leaf was signed to a four-year, $31.25 million contract, including an $11.25 million signing bonus, the largest ever given to an NFL rookie at the time.

Incidentally, he was able to take that as an "entertainment" tax deduction.

He was a star QB in college and the #2 NFL pick overall, only behind Peyton Manning.
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Last edited by Jasmine; 12-18-2019 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:23 AM
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Incidentally, he was able to take that as an "entertainment" tax deduction.
So what?

A tax deduction is not a tax credit. Even on a $3000 tab, he would still have been out at least half of that, given California and US income taxes at the time and his high tax bracket.

It doesn't matter what his signing bonus was. It was theft and credit card fraud, which is wrong no matter how wealthy he happened to be at the time. He took it in stride, but there's still a lot wrong with co-workers stealing thousands of dollars from you, even if it was possible to recoup some (not all) of that loss via the tax system.

And given Leaf's generally irresponsible behavior in the first place (pretty much partying from the moment he was drafted) and subsequent issues with burglary and drug abuse, including a prison stint, some responsible older teammates setting a better example wouldn't have been the worst thing, even if those efforts would likely be futile.
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:33 AM
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Ok I know this isnt that big of a deal but every year you hear tales of the NFL team rookie dinner where the rookie(s) takes the whole team out to a dinner ........

Now sometime in thr 80s/90s when rooks started to get millions of guaranteed money to find the most expensive restaurant and take him/them to the cleaners and laugh about it saying " he just got 5 mil as a singing bonus which they get to keep even if they never play a game " and treated as a practical joke but then you get things like this ...https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl...tes/ar-BBY5oLf

I send a chef friend the above link and she said if they ate half of what was on the pic of the receipt people probably be physically ill

I think its time to clamp down on the practice be it coaches and gms all the way up yto the commish ...
According to that article, the bill represented 2.7% of his salary. Which makes his salary $458,150 or so. Cry me a river

Surprising that people are all so worried about people who make almost 1/2 a million a year.
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:49 AM
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According to that article, the bill represented 2.7% of his salary. Which makes his salary $458,150 or so. Cry me a river

Surprising that people are all so worried about people who make almost 1/2 a million a year.
My salary at my job is a little under $50k a year. I would sure consider it a big financial deal if I had to treat my coworkers to a $1,300 meal against my will.
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:54 AM
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My salary at my job is a little under $50k a year. I would sure consider it a big financial deal if I had to treat my coworkers to a $1,300 meal against my will.
That's because there is a huge difference between a salary of $50k and $500k.

That's why people want to tax those who make $500k more than those who only make $50k.
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:54 AM
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Ok I know this isnt that big of a deal but every year you hear tales of the NFL team rookie dinner where the rookie(s) takes the whole team out to a dinner ........

Now sometime in thr 80s/90s when rooks started to get millions of guaranteed money to find the most expensive restaurant and take him/them to the cleaners and laugh about it saying " he just got 5 mil as a singing bonus which they get to keep even if they never play a game " and treated as a practical joke but then you get things like this ...https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl...tes/ar-BBY5oLf

I send a chef friend the above link and she said if they ate half of what was on the pic of the receipt people probably be physically ill

I think its time to clamp down on the practice be it coaches and gms all the way up yto the commish ...
What???
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:57 AM
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Ok I know this isnt that big of a deal but every year you hear tales of the NFL team rookie dinner where the rookie(s) takes the whole team out to a dinner ........

Now sometime in thr 80s/90s when rooks started to get millions of guaranteed money to find the most expensive restaurant and take him/them to the cleaners and laugh about it saying " he just got 5 mil as a singing bonus which they get to keep even if they never play a game " and treated as a practical joke but then you get things like this ...https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl...tes/ar-BBY5oLf

I send a chef friend the above link and she said if they ate half of what was on the pic of the receipt people probably be physically ill

I think its time to clamp down on the practice be it coaches and gms all the way up yto the commish ...
Nicolas, although somewhat soothed by the gingerly pocket and the clodhopper for the bubble, still can be kind to her from the ribbon near the guardian angel, find subtle faults with her a botched labyrinth with the cup, and tries to seduce the dark side of her mastadon. Jespera, although somewhat soothed by a swamp and a cup beyond the waif, still amorously graduates from her from the clock from a swamp, teach her a taxidermist with a cup related to a clock, and gives lectures on morality to the dark side of her looking glass.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:02 PM
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According to that article, the bill represented 2.7% of his salary. Which makes his salary $458,150 or so. Cry me a river
It's still wrong, no matter how much he makes.

But also, he's not a first round pick. His career is most likely to last less than 4 years. His NFL money (if he manages to save most of it) will make a solid retirement nest egg, but he'll have to find work like the rest of us before long. And unless he had a good major and a solid set of summer internships, he's not likely to be making 6 figures again for a long while.

I'm reasonably sure my age 65 finances will be better than his, even if he has reasonable money management skills. That is, unless he manages to be one of the very few 5th round picks to have an extended career. And even then, I'd have a good shot at being better off.

Last edited by Great Antibob; 12-18-2019 at 12:05 PM.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:05 PM
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That's because there is a huge difference between a salary of $50k and $500k.
OTOH, a young person making $50k today is likely just starting out on a steady career and will be making more than $50k in 10 years, the football player may be out on his rear in 3 years, and need to find an entirely new line of work that uses zero of his currently valuable skillset. NFL players should be banking the excess money they make today, not wasting it.

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  • If everybody else jumped off the Brooklyn Bridge, would you?
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Last edited by Cheesesteak; 12-18-2019 at 12:07 PM.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:09 PM
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That's because there is a huge difference between a salary of $50k and $500k.

That's why people want to tax those who make $500k more than those who only make $50k.
Theoretically that $50k job is sustainable. Itís certainly possible that the NFL player might make less money in their lifetime than someone with a solid, decent-paying job.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:13 PM
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It's still wrong, no matter how much he makes.

But also, he's not a first round pick. His career is most likely to last less than 4 years. His NFL money (if he manages to save most of it) will make a solid retirement nest egg, but he'll have to find work like the rest of us before long. And unless he had a good major and a solid set of summer internships, he's not likely to be making 6 figures again for a long while.

I'm reasonably sure my age 65 finances will be better than his, even if he has reasonable money management skills. That is, unless he manages to be one of the very few 5th round picks to have an extended career. And even then, I'd have a good shot at being better off.
So what? If someone offered you $500k as a salary for one year, the only stipulation was you had to buy one dinner for $13k, you'd turn that down?

Doubtful.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:15 PM
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OTOH, a young person making $50k today is likely just starting out on a steady career and will be making more than $50k in 10 years, the football player may be out on his rear in 3 years, and need to find an entirely new line of work that uses zero of his currently valuable skillset. NFL players should be banking the excess money they make today, not wasting it.
Hmmm...You might be right. Perhaps there should be extra tax breaks for poor football players who only earn $500k a year for their first 3 years just in case their career ends.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:20 PM
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Eliminating hazing in sports in all its manifestations (from the pro level on down) should be a priority, but it's doubtful that will happen, given we're dealing with humans and their worst instincts.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:40 PM
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Hmmm...You might be right. Perhaps there should be extra tax breaks for poor football players who only earn $500k a year for their first 3 years just in case their career ends.
Or the NFL in conjunction with the NFLPA sets up a 401K sort of situation for all players that invests huge chunks of their pay into tax-deferred investments. The government doesnít necessarily need to get involved here.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:55 PM
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Hmmm...You might be right. Perhaps there should be extra tax breaks for poor football players who only earn $500k a year for their first 3 years just in case their career ends.
While I applaud your willingness to have the government step in to protect these unfortunate souls perhaps the player's union could do something like... I dunno... act in the best interest of their rank and file?

Enact work rules to protect the players, not just from the owners, but from the poor behavior of other players, and ensure they obtain the financial skills necessary to deal with both their current good fortune, and the inevitable end of their careers.
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Old 12-18-2019, 12:59 PM
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Or the NFL in conjunction with the NFLPA sets up a 401K sort of situation for all players that invests huge chunks of their pay into tax-deferred investments. The government doesnít necessarily need to get involved here.
You mean like the "NFL Player Retirement Program"? They already have that.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:02 PM
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While I applaud your willingness to have the government step in to protect these unfortunate souls perhaps the player's union could do something like... I dunno... act in the best interest of their rank and file?

Enact work rules to protect the players, not just from the owners, but from the poor behavior of other players, and ensure they obtain the financial skills necessary to deal with both their current good fortune, and the inevitable end of their careers.
I agree. Everyone should boycott the NFL until they do something about this horrible travesty.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:10 PM
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This is rookie hazing pure and simple. What are the NFL rules on hazing and if they exist they should be enforced.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:10 PM
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You mean like the "NFL Player Retirement Program"? They already have that.
No, obviously what Iím proposing is very different from that. A pension is nothing like an investment program.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:13 PM
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So what? If someone offered you $500k as a salary for one year, the only stipulation was you had to buy one dinner for $13k, you'd turn that down?

Doubtful.
If someone offered me a $500k job with the stipulation that they'd get to punch me in the dick, I'd take it.

I'd still think mandatory dick punching should be stopped though. Not really a difficult concept.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:16 PM
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If someone offered me a $500k job with the stipulation that they'd get to punch me in the dick, I'd take it.

I'd still think mandatory dick punching should be stopped though. Not really a difficult concept.
No MMA career for you then.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:30 PM
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No, obviously what Iím proposing is very different from that. A pension is nothing like an investment program.
Like a 401k plan that they already have?
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:30 PM
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So what? If someone offered you $500k as a salary for one year, the only stipulation was you had to buy one dinner for $13k, you'd turn that down?

Doubtful.
Sure, but:

1) in this case the job involves playing football, not buying people dinner.
2) why the middle man? Just pay the player $487k and, as the employer, spend the $13k directly buying the others a meal.

No matter how 'trivial' the sum seems, it's still represents a sum that is a major portion of a first year teacher's salary. The NFL wants to encourage responsible money management among players. This sort of thing is antithetical to that drive.

Last edited by Great Antibob; 12-18-2019 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:31 PM
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If someone offered me a $500k job with the stipulation that they'd get to punch me in the dick, I'd take it.

I'd still think mandatory dick punching should be stopped though. Not really a difficult concept.
Strange, I wasn't aware that paying for dinner was mandatory. Is that like, in their contracts, or part of the Union agreement?
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:33 PM
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I don’t really know what the NFL or the teams can do about this. I’m sure there’s very much a snitches get stitches attitude on NFL teams so even if these dinners were banned, they’d still happen. And, NFL coaches aren’t like college coaches, they don’t really have the ability to punish players by having them sit a half against West Arkansas State or whatever.

I’m sure even during the rookie financial education forums, the players are on their phones and dreaming of everything they’re going to buy.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:38 PM
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So what? If someone offered you $500k as a salary for one year, the only stipulation was you had to buy one dinner for $13k, you'd turn that down?

Doubtful.
Not the only stipulation, now, is it. Comes with risk of significant injury, including brain injury. Also comes after dedicating your life to even getting to that point where any kind of offer is made, often to the exclusion of building skills that could provide a living after the NFL chew you up and spits you out. Now, that is a choice, and n my opinion a poor one, but the notion that 500k is easy money when made by an NFL rookie is ridiculous.
ďOh, well, he has/makes more money than me so fuck what happens to himĒ is an unappealing line of reasoning.
But most important, hazing has no place in adult society, and often the biggest hazers are the ones who earned the right (if such is even possible) the least.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:39 PM
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I agree. Everyone should boycott the NFL until they do something about this horrible travesty.
Hey, I'm a Giants fan... don't tempt me.
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Old 12-18-2019, 01:52 PM
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Strange, I wasn't aware that paying for dinner was mandatory. Is that like, in their contracts, or part of the Union agreement?
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Old 12-18-2019, 02:02 PM
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I donít really know what the NFL or the teams can do about this. Iím sure thereís very much a snitches get stitches attitude on NFL teams so even if these dinners were banned, theyíd still happen. And, NFL coaches arenít like college coaches, they donít really have the ability to punish players by having them sit a half against West Arkansas State or whatever.
Coaches and staff still have considerable power over players. They can threaten to sit a player (though that's really rare, especially if a player is critical to the team's success), but they can fine them. That's how they've managed to eradicate a lot of preseason hazing, or at least limited it to the trivial (i.e. carrying the veterans' bags, singing a song before video reviews, providing snacks for the team or squad, etc.). They could very easily levy fines that would stop this immediately.
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Old 12-18-2019, 02:06 PM
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ďOh, well, he has/makes more money than me so fuck what happens to himĒ is an unappealing line of reasoning.
No, it's more like "He makes $500,000 a year. I really don't care about one measly dinner. Boo Hoo"

I mean, that's really it. Can't believe that people here are really worried about a guy who makes $500,000 a year having to buy one $13,000 dinner.

You know he will have to pay almost $200,000 in taxes, right? Probably should worry about that more if you think he deserves any sort of worry.
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Old 12-18-2019, 02:26 PM
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Can't believe that people here are really worried about a guy who makes $500,000 a year having to buy one $13,000 dinner.
No, we're worried about the hypocritical silence from the NFL on an issue that they pretend to say they care about. As many have pointed out, the NFL has rookies go through financial responsibility programs and classes, then turns a blind eye to their veteran players pressuring rookies to be financially irresponsible.

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You know he will have to pay almost $200,000 in taxes, right? Probably should worry about that more if you think he deserves any sort of worry.
So you bitch at people for suggesting that the NFL create some sort of self-funding deferred compensation retirement program, and THEN bitch at them for not worrying about their tax situation enough? Someone got a Jelly of the Month Club membership from work instead of that big year-end bonus, didn't they?
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Old 12-18-2019, 02:43 PM
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Ok I know this isnt that big of a deal but every year you hear tales of the NFL team rookie dinner where the rookie(s) takes the whole team out to a dinner ........

Now sometime in thr 80s/90s when rooks started to get millions of guaranteed money to find the most expensive restaurant and take him/them to the cleaners and laugh about it saying " he just got 5 mil as a singing bonus which they get to keep even if they never play a game " and treated as a practical joke but then you get things like this ...https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl...tes/ar-BBY5oLf
I don't see this as being taken to the cleaners. You or I might see a $10,000 bill and realize we might have to sell a vehicle or take out a loan to cover something like that.
But, 10,000 out of $5,000,000? That's like an average person that makes $50k per year (or getting a 50k bonus) having to spring for a $100 dinner. It's not going to break you.
I also assuming they're not being forced to do it so it doesn't rise to the level of hazing.
I could see this being a bigger issue if, say, when the rookie signs, someone steals his credit card and then the team goes out for dinner. Ignoring for a moment the legal implications of it, the $10,000 tab is being forced on him.
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Old 12-18-2019, 02:48 PM
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No, we're worried about the hypocritical silence from the NFL on an issue that they pretend to say they care about. As many have pointed out, the NFL has rookies go through financial responsibility programs and classes, then turns a blind eye to their veteran players pressuring rookies to be financially irresponsible
I'm shocked that the NFL is hypocritical and really only cares about wringing every last dollar out of treating players like slaves with no regard for their personal or financial well-being. When did this start??

You gonna stop watching football because of it? (if you do watch football)

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So you bitch at people for suggesting that the NFL create some sort of self-funding deferred compensation retirement program, and THEN bitch at them for not worrying about their tax situation enough?
This is a strange statement because nowhere have I "bitched" at people for suggesting something that the NFL already has.
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Old 12-18-2019, 03:06 PM
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While we're at it, we should really do something about the guy that drinks two beers that someone else paid for, then "has to hit the road" before buying a round. In fact, I think this is more important than the football dinner thing.
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Old 12-18-2019, 03:10 PM
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I'm shocked that the NFL is hypocritical and really only cares about wringing every last dollar out of treating players like slaves with no regard for their personal or financial well-being. When did this start??

You gonna stop watching football because of it? (if you do watch football)
You sound exactly like the “if you don’t like the country then live somewhere else” crowd.

You can enjoy a sports organization and still criticize aspects of the way it is run. You’re implying that anything other than a boycott is hypocrisy. That’s childish.

Last edited by Atamasama; 12-18-2019 at 03:10 PM.
  #40  
Old 12-18-2019, 03:10 PM
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I'm shocked that the NFL is hypocritical and really only cares about wringing every last dollar out of treating players like slaves with no regard for their personal or financial well-being. When did this start?? ]
I don't believe anyone has expressed anything resembling shock that the NFL is full of shit and doesn't entirely have their players' best interests at heart.

Quote:
You gonna stop watching football because of it? (if you do watch football)
Doing/saying nothing or enacting a complete boycott aren't quite the only options here. I'm going to be a rebel and walk this razor thin gray line of "attempt to have a civil discussion on the internet about an issue I mildly care about this afternoon".

Quote:
This is a strange statement because nowhere have I "bitched" at people for suggesting something that the NFL already has.
The NFL has a 401k plan. That's great, but a $19,500 annual contribution limit is pretty low (it won't even pay for 2 dinners with you and your friends from work!).

The NFL has a player pension, paid for by the individual teams. This is also great, but not what I was talking about.

The NFL has an Annuity Program with both Qualified and Non-Qualified components, paid for by the individual teams. This is pretty nice, but it's also not what I was talking about.

The NFL also has a Capital Accumulation Plan, which is a defined contribution plan. As you may have figured out, this is also not what I was talking about.

But since you keep saying that the NFL has a self-funded deferred compensation option, please - tell me all about it.
  #41  
Old 12-18-2019, 03:22 PM
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Doing/saying nothing or enacting a complete boycott aren't quite the only options here. I'm going to be a rebel and walk this razor thin gray line of "attempt to have a civil discussion on the internet about an issue I mildly care about this afternoon".
That's fair. I wish you well in your endeavors in caring about poor football players making only $500k a year.
  #42  
Old 12-18-2019, 03:47 PM
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*mildly care
  #43  
Old 12-18-2019, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Calavera View Post
Nicolas, although somewhat soothed by the gingerly pocket and the clodhopper for the bubble, still can be kind to her from the ribbon near the guardian angel, find subtle faults with her a botched labyrinth with the cup, and tries to seduce the dark side of her mastadon. Jespera, although somewhat soothed by a swamp and a cup beyond the waif, still amorously graduates from her from the clock from a swamp, teach her a taxidermist with a cup related to a clock, and gives lectures on morality to the dark side of her looking glass.
What the heck is this supposed to be, a really bad random text generator? Please explain.
  #44  
Old 12-19-2019, 09:30 AM
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You can enjoy a sports organization and still criticize aspects of the way it is run. Youíre implying that anything other than a boycott is hypocrisy. Thatís childish.
Sure, you CAN. Just like you can complain about the low wages and poor treatment of workers by Walmart and still shop there.
  #45  
Old 12-19-2019, 10:55 AM
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The point missed, deliberately or otherwise, is that it isn’t 500k a year, it is that it is 500 k *for* a year.
Or 2 or three, but certainly not a lifetime, or even anything remotely resembling a normal career.
Most of these guys, making 500 k in some few of their years, make considerably less post those years, to the point that their average is likely below 100k/year equivalent. At which point, it is entirely appropriate to have sympathy. (If you felt that sympathy for people making 500k, even routinely, is unwarranted - something that frankly puzzles me )
Also, there’s this: “welcome to the NFL - here’s a 10 k dinner tab” as an introduction to the life, then followed by finger wagging and tsk tsk-ing over the extravagances the player subsequently engages in. If you’re gonna make 2 million over your NFL career, you should live as if you make 80-100k/year. But that’s hard to do in the middle of this type of nonsense.
Last, but most important, of course: hazing is repugnant. It has some place, arguably and perhaps, in certain settings, but not in any job. There is immense power disparity between most rookies joining a team and marquee players. making this bullying no matter how much the guy makes.
  #46  
Old 12-19-2019, 11:04 AM
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I also fail to see how hazing benefits team morale at all. If someone is a rookie or free agent, seems to me the team should be doing all it can to make them feel welcome, not haze them.
  #47  
Old 12-20-2019, 02:42 AM
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I can see the justification for hazing so long as 1. the point is to teach humility, respect, and team spirit, 2. it stays within the team, 3. it never strays into anything illegal or grossly offensive, and 4. it doesn't cause harm. Carrying bags, fine. Doing the laundry, fine. Serving as a wingman, fine. Even cornball stuff like dancing on a table while everyone else shouts and throws dollar bills (I think I read about this in The Dark Side of the Game) is acceptable, provided of course the table is sufficiently sturdy and big enough that they don't risk falling off or tripping over each other.

Sticking someone with a ten grand dinner bill strikes me as way beyond the pale. And this can't be blithely brushed off with an "oh, he's making enough". What if he was planning to spend it on something nice for himself? What if he's had to deal with a bankruptcy or financial hardship earlier in life? What if he just really, really hates wasting money? Making the reservation would have been perfectly fine, as would downloading and printing menus, dropping them off, arranging for the rides home, calculating the tip, any number of things he REASONABLY could've done to make the night run smoothly. But nobody is entitled to an enormous chunk of someone else's money whenever he feels like it.

But that's just my take, and I'd rather not make any big judgments before hearing Walker's side. Who knows, maybe he was just trying to make a big impression and didn't mind the hit at all. There are players like that, rookie or otherwise.
  #48  
Old 12-20-2019, 06:07 AM
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what struck me is what they ordered.... the same time i read the link they had the wagyu beef that someone served on chopped and the chefs said the cut that people were using cost about 350.00 a pound and it was so rich that moat places wouldn't sell more than 3 oz per person .... and someone ordered 40 ozs? and probably ate 3 bites of it .......


I would have looked at all of it and said "you order it you eat all of it mf's " even if they barfed it all up later ....
  #49  
Old 12-21-2019, 11:15 PM
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The NFL minimum salary is $480,000 so as long as the older players keep it reasonable it shouldn’t be a total hardship. You would hope the veterans would discuss the players salary and pick an appropriate restaurant.

That said, it does seem a bit mean for a player making millions to bully a guy who’s making 1/10 their salary to buy them dinner. I also don’t see what this teaches the younger guys, as opposed to making them carry their gear which at least teaches you your place as a rookie.


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  #50  
Old 12-22-2019, 08:15 AM
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Baseball does hazing of rookies on a road trip by taking their clothes away and making them wear odd costumes including female characters.
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