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  #51  
Old 08-15-2018, 12:43 PM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
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Originally Posted by GaryM View Post
The 22LR is likely to cause more infection as most of the bullets are lubed with grease. This grease tends to carry more debris for whatever clothing or other objects it passes through on the way into the body. The 25ACP is metal jacketed and may leave a cleaner wound channel.

Of course I'd prerfer being shot with neither one.
John M Browning reputedly designed the .25 as a more reliable replacement for the .22 in really small automatic pistols. Accordingly, he made it centerfire and rimless. Because of the rimless design, it uses bullets that fit inside the case mouth rather than the heeled bullets found in the .22lr. I have seen plain cast lead .25 bullets and hollowpoint .25 bullets, but most are, as you say, metal jacketed that improves feeding. In any event, Browning's improvements still make the .25 a better choice in tiny automatics to this day. Both rounds rely exclusively on penetration for wounding at the velocities achieved from really short pistol barrels. Any mushrooming of hollow points just reduces penetration without really increasing the wound channel to a valuable degree. The metal jacket can actually be considered a feature, in that respect.
  #52  
Old 08-15-2018, 02:29 PM
Gray Ghost Gray Ghost is offline
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
Really? I have one, tool, spare magazine and sidearm with original magazine, all s/n.
I am not an expert, or even an aficionado of Luger values. However, there are easily findable resources where you could find the value of your pistol. AIUI, collectors prize pistols that are rare, in outstanding condition, where all of the serial numbers match, for all parts---and the list of parts that are numbered is considerable. See, for example, this quote from a collectors' discussion board about Luger parts. https://www.gunvaluesboard.com/guide...gers-1877.html
Quote:
What parts must be numbered on a Luger?

Depends if it is military of commercial. The following parts should have serial numbers on them:

Frame - full serial number with suffix
Under barrel - full serial number with or without suffix
Left side of the receiver - full serial number without suffix

All the following parts should have the last two numerals stamped on military guns:

Firing pin
Extractor
Sear bar
Breechblock
Front toggle link
Rear toggle link
Locking bolt (takedown lever)
Side plate (with a few exceptions through the years, see comments on side plate)
Trigger
Safety lever
Safety bar
Hold-open latch
Grips (inside)
Note, that the rear toggle pin was not serial-numbered until 1932.

There were two “styles” of serial number marking, Commercial style and Military style. In commercial style, some of the numbers, notably the side-plate and locking bolt, were stamped underneath in a way which did not affect the surface look of the gun–military serial numbers were stamped on the visible surfaces. If your mismatched parts are stamped highly visibly, they likely come from military guns.
A lot more numbered parts than I suspected, but I've never owned a Luger. Condition is very important. 95%+ is often seen for the really pricey versions.

If your pistol has all of these features, then I wouldn't be surprised to see a value in the 1500 dollar plus range, vs a "shooter" Luger which would be worth much less. This Houston gun store (http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/lu...=newest&page=1), which is really more of a museum than a place you'd actually buy a gun, IMHO, has several Lugers in the 1700-8800 dollar range. Great place to browse though, and the staff is usually friendly.

Gunbroker also has Lugers for sale, and is another way of seeing what these guns are selling for right now.

Edit: Scumpup, all else remaining equal, isn't the muzzle velocity on .22LR usually higher than that for .25ACP? Yet the muzzle velocity is usually low enough that the bullet doesn't usually fragment? The reason I ask is that .22LR has a reputation for penetrating, while .25ACP definitely doesn't, yet the sectional densities for typical bullets in both, 40 grain and 50 grain, is supposed to be really close.

Last edited by Gray Ghost; 08-15-2018 at 02:31 PM.
  #53  
Old 08-15-2018, 02:52 PM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray Ghost View Post

Edit: Scumpup, all else remaining equal, isn't the muzzle velocity on .22LR usually higher than that for .25ACP? Yet the muzzle velocity is usually low enough that the bullet doesn't usually fragment? The reason I ask is that .22LR has a reputation for penetrating, while .25ACP definitely doesn't, yet the sectional densities for typical bullets in both, 40 grain and 50 grain, is supposed to be really close.
When fired from barrels of the same length, performance is about equal. The .22 benefits from having pistols and rifles with longer barrels available. Other than a couple of bizarre European revolvers from the 1920s, I've never seen anything other than small automatics that use the .25. Those revos were tiny, too. Anyway, firing a .22 from even a four inch barrel will boost the velocity above what a .25 with a two inch barrel yields.
This short article deals with the topic
  #54  
Old 08-15-2018, 07:52 PM
Sloe Moe Sloe Moe is offline
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I recall the Ingram MAC used to be made in all ACP's from .25 to .45 but ironically, the European 9mm was the most popular.
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