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  #101  
Old 09-02-2019, 08:46 AM
F. U. Shakespeare is offline
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
That's not my impression of the 1950's and 60's; which is when I grew up. (I was born in the early 50's.) I think the demand for physical "perfection" has gotten much worse since then, and starts at much earlier ages.
Absolutely. It was even (for men) a status symbol to be a little out of shape. Comedian Alan King did a routine decrying the small, brief fitness craze of the 1950s. That spare tire around his middle, King declared, showed that when there was hard work to be done, he could afford to hire someone to do it. The emphasis on being fit made no sense to him: "Are we going to wrestle the communists?" Admittedly, there was more pressure on women to at least look fit, whether achieved by dieting or wearing constricting undergarments.

A bigger fitness craze began in earnest around 1980. Baby boomers metabolisms were slowing down. Arnold Schwarzenegger's fame made it less weird to lift weights. Running, especially distance running, became much more common. I remember when a middle aged civil servant in my hometown ran marathons. It was unheard of. Everybody thought the guy was Superman. But within a few years, it was no big deal.

IMO the emergence of older people in good shape increased the aversion to non-fit people walking around scantily clad.
  #102  
Old 09-02-2019, 08:57 AM
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Anyone still have a road atlas for that matter?
I was at the Sprawl Mart yesterday and noticed a couple racks of them past the checkouts. The Sprawltons doesn't waste resources on something that doesn't sell.
  #103  
Old 09-02-2019, 09:44 AM
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Back in the day I had a "hand held device" that played music that I could listen to when I was outside. Now, while walking the dog (out in the country) I have a hand held device that plays music, including songs I listened to back in the day (including Out in the Country).
Back then it was a transister radio, today it's an iPhone and iTunes.
  #104  
Old 09-02-2019, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post

Perhaps it's my imagination, but I swear women's facial expressions have changed over the past 40 years. Women used to smile more. Now the "stone/cold/serious" face seems to be the norm.
Agreed. I hit my teens in the 60s. Girls my age used to have smiles on their faces ALL the time. Now I see teen aged girls and they all look like they just ate something really bitter.

People were politer and nicer to each other back then, too. I miss that.
  #105  
Old 09-02-2019, 01:14 PM
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Girls my age used to have smiles on their faces ALL the time.
Thank goodness that this has changed.
  #106  
Old 09-02-2019, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by chappachula View Post
The title of the thread is small subtle changes....so here's a pretty small one:
People used to put a pencil behind their ear.
And if you did not have a pencil at hand you could always use a cigarrette. Another nice custom lost.
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  #107  
Old 09-03-2019, 10:31 AM
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Paper maps have advantages over computer ones in some ways.

If one wants to be generally oriented over a significant area, as opposed to just finding the way to a specific address, that's much easier to do on paper maps. They can be spread out over a larger area, so one can see how locations relate to each other without having the smaller details disappear. Whenever I set a computer map to let me see a larger area, the street names and then entire smaller streets disappear from the map; I can see the detail or the broader picture, but not both at the same time, as I can on a paper map.

Atlases are somewhere half inbetween -- even large ones don't have the space available of any individual foldable paper map, but on the other hand they have it all organized and together for a much wider area, so it's not necessary to shuffle through a dozen or two dozen separate paper maps which keep changing relative positions all over the table (and, if you're like me, the floor.)

Probably the ideal is to have all versions available, computer maps and GPS voices and individual paper maps and an atlas. And a globe, while we're at it. They all show different things, and are more or less useful in different situations.
  #108  
Old 09-03-2019, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Can't you put outgoing mail in YOUR mailbox for the postal worker to pick up? (I believe you live in the country, but you do have a mailbox, right?)

I'm asking because a friend of mine (my age-- almost 70) thought you had to go to the post office to mail anything. While visiting her in St. Louis a few years ago, I had something to mail, and I put it in her mailbox. She had never heard of this and actually said to me, "I hope the mailman knows what to do!" What did she think the flag on the mailbox was for?

Since that incident happened, I've been wondering-- is this not common knowledge, i.e., that you can put outgoing mail in your own mailbox and put the flag up, or clip the outgoing piece to the letter slot cover, and the postal worker will pick it up and take it to the post office for you?
In the town where my office is, the "mailman" isn't a uniformed USPS worker -- she's an apparently independent contractor who drives around delivering the mail in her own car. She's definitely not hip to the raised flag on the mailbox meaning outgoing mail. Fortunately, the post office is only a block away from the office.

(Slight hijack: why is there a mailbox in front of the post office? You're there!!

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Originally Posted by furryman View Post
I got white pages and yellow pages up until 2017. I figured they stopped because they weren't making money.
My employer stopped advertising in the yellow pages about five years ago. Said she didn't see the point in this day and age.

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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
We went a traveling this summer and had a large stack of paper maps – the free ones printed by the state.
Ah, the Thomas Bros. Guide. My faithful companion in my early driving days.

Quote:
Reminds me a an exchange from some other forum thing
How did people find their way around before they had google?
We used maps.
No, I mean before google.
The other day, my employer said she needed to find an address. "I'll look on MapQuest."

MapQuest.

The look I gave her caused her to burst out laughing. She said I looked at her as if she suggested using a dowsing rod and a Ouija board.
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  #109  
Old 09-03-2019, 11:38 AM
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(Slight hijack: why is there a mailbox in front of the post office? You're there!!
For when they are closed. Also, the box in front of our PO is car accessible.
  #110  
Old 09-03-2019, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
My favorite is that in the 1970s you called places, but now you can actually call people.

1972:

<ring-ring!>
Is Mom there?
No, I think she's at Aunt Betty's.

<ring-ring!>
Aunt Betty? Is Mom there?
Sorry, honey, but she went to work.

<ring-ring!>
Hello?
Mom?
Yes, honey...

Now:

<ring-ring!>
Is Mom there?
You're calling my cell phone, dipshit. Who do you think is answering this call?
Excellently put. Seems obvious when you think about it, but I’m glad you pointed it out.
  #111  
Old 09-03-2019, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Paper maps have advantages over computer ones in some ways.

If one wants to be generally oriented over a significant area, as opposed to just finding the way to a specific address, that's much easier to do on paper maps. They can be spread out over a larger area, so one can see how locations relate to each other without having the smaller details disappear. Whenever I set a computer map to let me see a larger area, the street names and then entire smaller streets disappear from the map; I can see the detail or the broader picture, but not both at the same time, as I can on a paper map.

Atlases are somewhere half inbetween -- even large ones don't have the space available of any individual foldable paper map, but on the other hand they have it all organized and together for a much wider area, so it's not necessary to shuffle through a dozen or two dozen separate paper maps which keep changing relative positions all over the table (and, if you're like me, the floor.)

Probably the ideal is to have all versions available, computer maps and GPS voices and individual paper maps and an atlas. And a globe, while we're at it. They all show different things, and are more or less useful in different situations.
I too have found the curation of what is important on a given scale to be a useful feature of physical maps. Seeing the bigger picture on the other hand is more of an advantage except when you have a small device.

I only got a wireless internet-enabled smartphone in the middle of my last road trip vacation so I'm not sure what I'm going to do for my next one. I print out maps from Google for the specific places I want to go to and then have to write on them in pen if anything is confusingly labelled, and then rely on an atlas for the big picture. It remains to be seen if I will find it worth my time to do that now that I can just use my smartphone except when I need to look at it while driving.
  #112  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:01 PM
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I'm 52. Every now and then I suddenly realize I don't see something anymore.

Just last week I saw a man jogging without a shirt on. Back in the 1970s it was very common to see a man walking around bare chested. Today it's a very rare occurrence.

Mustaches were very common among men in the 1970s. I think only state troopers have them now.

Perhaps it's my imagination, but I swear women's facial expressions have changed over the past 40 years. Women used to smile more. Now the "stone/cold/serious" face seems to be the norm.

The most obvious one, of course, is cigarette smoking. I'm glad that's gone away.
Just thought of this one yesterday. On Reddit, which skews young (though not nearly as much as it did 5 years ago) there was a picture of the bleachers in Wrigley Field. The top comment on the pic was someone asking: "Why isn't that one guy wearing a shirt???", as if it were a shocking thing to see.

Back when I was a kid in Chicago, if the weather was good you would see half the men in the bleachers shirtless. I was there a couple of times when I felt odd for keeping my shirt on.
  #113  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:08 PM
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Does anyone roller blade/inline skate anymore? I was reminded about this yesterday at a garage sale where they were selling a pair.
I used to run on a trail after work and there was a man who was older (60s probably, early 70s at the oldest) who would roller blade almost every day. He's the only person I've seen 'blading in ages.

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Originally Posted by Clark Cello View Post
Just thought of this one yesterday. On Reddit, which skews young (though not nearly as much as it did 5 years ago) there was a picture of the bleachers in Wrigley Field. The top comment on the pic was someone asking: "Why isn't that one guy wearing a shirt???", as if it were a shocking thing to see.

Back when I was a kid in Chicago, if the weather was good you would see half the men in the bleachers shirtless. I was there a couple of times when I felt odd for keeping my shirt on.
And now we have the obligatory shirtless dude at almost every sporting event. Extra points if it's not appropriate for the weather at all (lookin at you Packer fan in January)
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  #114  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:14 PM
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Remember the police MAN and the fire MAN and the mail MAN? When women first started doing these jobs, it seemed totally amazing. I remember calling the police for my friend and, when a woman showing up, her 7 year old son asking "Are you the police?"

These days, it's not even a thought when a police officer, a fire fighter or a letter carrier turns out to be a woman.
  #115  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:16 PM
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Do people still wax their cars? It was more common in the 70s

And waxing and shaving sexy parts was unheard of.
  #116  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:25 PM
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Remember when you could eat whatever you felt like eating and didn't have people commenting on your food choices, which are none of their damn business anyways?

I miss those days.

All the local buses have a sign saying no smoking, no food or drink, and radios silent. Today, nobody would think of smoking on a bus, and who has a radio anymore (though I have heard drivers telling people to turn it down or use an earplug for their device). And I don't see how they can outlaw coffee drinkers, particularly on the early morning buses.
  #117  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Remember the police MAN and the fire MAN and the mail MAN? When women first started doing these jobs, it seemed totally amazing. I remember calling the police for my friend and, when a woman showing up, her 7 year old son asking "Are you the police?"

These days, it's not even a thought when a police officer, a fire fighter or a letter carrier turns out to be a woman.
Remember help-wanted ads categorized as "help wanted: male" and "help wanted: female"?

That was entirely standard continuing into the 1970's. I think it went away sometime in the 80's.

-- I've never followed sports that much; but I don't think the girls' teams, even to the extent that they existed, got anywhere near the same news coverage as the boys'.

And yes: boys and men didn't shave anything but their faces. Girls and women shaved their legs from the knees down, and armpits. Nobody shaved their crotches! That would have been considered really weird.
  #118  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:36 PM
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Any I remember when no self-respecting woman would wear pants in public. Only skirts.
  #119  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:47 PM
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Excellently put. Seems obvious when you think about it, but I’m glad you pointed it out.
It's funny because the scriptwriters for American Hustle forgot this. My memory is a bit hazy, but Bradley Cooper calls somebody, argues with them, then asks "where are you?"... and I'm thinking, "But, Bradley, you called him. You should know exactly where he is!" And he should have known this (well, maybe not the specific office#, but he knows what building/business he calls) - it's how calls were made in 1979.

"Let me call around, see if I can find... " is a sentence uttered maybe 20 times a day now, but it was uttered millions of times daily back in the 70s, because that's how you found a particular person to call - by calling places, and seeing if they were there.

So get with it, Bradley Cooper!

Last edited by JohnT; 09-03-2019 at 12:49 PM.
  #120  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
Do people still wax their cars? It was more common in the 70s
My gf takes her car and truck to a local guy who waxes & details cars (inside and out) on the side for $100 (cash) once a year.

I wax my car right after bringing it home from the lot. I was & wax it again when I trade it in 150,000 miles later.

ETA: my gf has her car washed every couple of weeks as well.

Last edited by kayaker; 09-03-2019 at 12:52 PM.
  #121  
Old 09-03-2019, 01:08 PM
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... Nobody shaved their crotches! That would have been considered really weird.
When I was dating in the early 80s and well into the 90s, it was considered kinky for a woman to shave her crotch.
  #122  
Old 09-03-2019, 01:49 PM
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Traveler's checks. I remember that we used to get traveler's checks before going on vacation or traveling somewhere. I haven't thought about them in years until I read about a clerk at a store refused to sell them to a person of color who was buying them to use for rent payment. So they've gone from a "safer way to use money" to a poor tax for people who can't use a checking account for whatever reason.
  #123  
Old 09-03-2019, 02:27 PM
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Anyone still have a road atlas for that matter?
Yes- I bought one specifically because we were taking a road trip vacation this summer and I wasn't sure if cell service was readily available everywhere we were going.

Came in handy too, although not where I thought. I had thought eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska would be relatively bereft of cell coverage. Turned out that south-central Nebraska had NO coverage, while the more remote areas on the trip were generally well provisioned. We also got the occasional random areas where we technically had cell coverage, but it was so slow and low-power that we may as well have not had it.

My addition to the list of subtle behaviors that have gone by the wayside is being asked if you wanted to sit in the smoking or non-smoking section at a restaurant. That's been done for at least 15-20 years around here, but was the norm when I was younger.
  #124  
Old 09-03-2019, 02:37 PM
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My addition to the list of subtle behaviors that have gone by the wayside is being asked if you wanted to sit in the smoking or non-smoking section at a restaurant. That's been done for at least 15-20 years around here, but was the norm when I was younger.
When I was a kid, EVERYWHERE in a restaurant was a smoking section. I don't remember exactly when non-smoking sections started to become a thing.

And I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned this yet (and apologies if I missed it): writing a check for, well, anything. I used to write several checks a week, now, it's maybe one a month, if at all. And it was common practice to write a check at the grocery store for 10 or 20 or 30 bucks over the amount you owed, just so you could get some cash.
  #125  
Old 09-03-2019, 02:58 PM
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When I was a kid, EVERYWHERE in a restaurant was a smoking section. I don't remember exactly when non-smoking sections started to become a thing.

And I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned this yet (and apologies if I missed it): writing a check for, well, anything. I used to write several checks a week, now, it's maybe one a month, if at all. And it was common practice to write a check at the grocery store for 10 or 20 or 30 bucks over the amount you owed, just so you could get some cash.
This can be added to the bit about outgoing mail. I suddenly had the thought that I hadn't been to the mailbox in a while because we used to mail our energy bill out (they didn't pay online) and I haven't done that in a while. Couldn't tell you the last thing I mailed that wasn't a package of some sort.
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  #126  
Old 09-03-2019, 02:59 PM
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My addition to the list of subtle behaviors that have gone by the wayside is being asked if you wanted to sit in the smoking or non-smoking section at a restaurant. That's been done for at least 15-20 years around here, but was the norm when I was younger.
Same with airlines. There was a time you could smoke at 10.000 m and I liked it.
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And yes: boys and men didn't shave anything but their faces. Girls and women shaved their legs from the knees down, and armpits. Nobody shaved their crotches! That would have been considered really weird.
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Originally Posted by Zyada View Post
When I was dating in the early 80s and well into the 90s, it was considered kinky for a woman to shave her crotch.
That was something only porn actors and actresses would do. Well, that is what the world has come to...
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  #127  
Old 09-03-2019, 03:34 PM
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This is quite noticeable here. There's a wooded area with a creek next to us. The kids used to play there a lot. They beat down trails and such. Now, the only trail is one the deer use. There was a time the kids used to cut thru the yards and then thru the woods to get to the other side of the neighborhood. But they don't even do that any more.

I can't even yell at the kids to get of my lawn anymore.
I never see neighborhood kids outside playing random games, random contests like 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 football games stretching across two neighbor's lawns, regardless of whether we'd asked permission to use their property or not. No kids biking around the neighborhood. It's all organized now: kids join squads or clubs.
  #128  
Old 09-03-2019, 03:37 PM
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Anyone remember Friday night trips to Blockbuster video?

That's, like, way gone.
  #129  
Old 09-03-2019, 03:44 PM
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You don't see teens sprawled across the hoods of their cars anymore. That was a very popular place to kick back.

And you just don't see people cutting their jeans and turning them into jorts (jean shorts). Now, they are bought that way.

Who pulls out a back-pocket comb anymore for a few whisks through the hair nowadays? It might happen, but nowhere near as often.

Littering was so bad in the 70's that we needed a massive national campaign against it. It was very common (and didn't enrage many people) to just see someone toss out their McDonalds or Burger King trash right out the car window. A big deal to very few.

Seems like going door to door and offering to shovel snow (or cut lawns) for a few bucks took a nose dive after the 1970's.

.
  #130  
Old 09-03-2019, 04:02 PM
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To show my redneck heritage, my father always had a pickup truck with beer windows in the back (those were sliding windows where you could reach back and grab a new beer without taking your eyes off the road).

He would take me and my friends driving but we had to sit in the back in the scorching Louisiana heat where you were lucky to stand up without losing significant skin in the process. Nothing was illegal back then because accidents hadn't yet been invented. We got stopped a few times and the cops always apologized to us and told us to make it home safely. You could blow things up with our homemade cannon and our full scale arsenal as the mood struck.

The liquor age was officially 18 but nobody checked. It was really just a height chart measured by the store counter so, if you were over 12 or so, you were in the game. The driving age was 15 but nobody cared about that either. I learned to drive when I was 13, drove everywhere when I was 14 and got my full license on my 15th birthday.

I still refuse to acknowledge the turn of the century. As recently as 2000, I tried to smuggle my pet iguana through Logan airport because I didn't have anyone to take care of my junior T-Rex. I tried to explain to the very buxom security agent that she better be careful when she opened that pet carrier but she didn't listen. She opened it anyway and ended up with a giant lizard holding on to her boobs. She screamed, he bolted down the terminal and I had to run through security to catch him.

I would probably be shot for that today. Simpler times.
  #131  
Old 09-03-2019, 04:34 PM
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Anyone still have a road atlas for that matter?
Yeah. GPS and google maps are great to find the fastest way somewhere, but they don't have an option for 'a bit longer but probably cooler scenery'.

If I'm not in a rush or I'm just trying to explore an area, paper maps are great.

People no longer even ask if it's OK for them to smoke in your house or car, they just go outside by default.
  #132  
Old 09-03-2019, 04:54 PM
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Has this been mentioned? Earbuds / earphones.

In the 70's / 80's you maybe saw a kid here or there with a Walkman or one of those earphones/radio things, but you would never see an adult walking down the street with a set of earphones strung over his head - earbuds didn't even really exist when I was a kid anyway.
  #133  
Old 09-03-2019, 05:35 PM
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Here's one: Flat tires. Tire technology has become so good, they're much more rare than they used to be.......
How about battery technology - has anybody mentioned that? Time was everyone (if you had a car in the UK) would have a battery charger in the garage. AND sometimes people would actually put their car in the garage.

But here's the biggie for me - and the why-it-is. It just about fits the timeframe because it's a generational effect. Sports participation for kids is way down (in the UK at least - US also?). I see a real big drop off in the last 10 years, but I think the start of the phenomenon was the 80's and into the 90's. And the reason is this: this is the first generation of adolescents who, rather than getting involved in sports, sit in their bedrooms gaming - where their parents don't think this is unusual/unhealthy/unacceptable because it's exactly what they did as well.

Hmm - a little rant there. Sorry 'bout that.

j

Last edited by Treppenwitz; 09-03-2019 at 05:37 PM.
  #134  
Old 09-03-2019, 06:18 PM
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Wristwatches.
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  #135  
Old 09-03-2019, 06:51 PM
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Wristwatches.
Really? I see plenty of watches, they are just now mostly smart watches.
  #136  
Old 09-03-2019, 08:01 PM
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Anyone still have a road atlas for that matter?
Ha! I still have a Thomas Guide in my car, but I can't remember the last time I used it. Over 10 years, for sure.
  #137  
Old 09-03-2019, 08:14 PM
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things that use to be considered luxries that have filtered down to even low income people

I remember that if someone had 2 cars.. dads car was the nice one and moms was the old beater if it wasn't used for a trade-in

Having more than one tv in the house ..If you did have more than one the good one was in the parent's room and if the kids did it was the old B&W KMC special dad bought in college that was unearthed from the garage so they could the atari

More than one pc ....remember the parents had the up to date one and you had the old one with some simple games on it to keep you off of dads so you didn't mess it up

and you had to share the Nintendo with your family ....now every kid in the family has a ps4 or xb1 because of online gaming ......
  #138  
Old 09-03-2019, 08:28 PM
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Really? I see plenty of watches, they are just now mostly smart watches.
Not all of them. I am really into watches as jewelry and I have some beautiful ones.

Great fact - do you know what someone who is really into watches is called?

Answer: A horologist which isn't nearly as fun as it sounds. The cost involved directly refers to the number of "complications" which is a near perfect analogy.
  #139  
Old 09-03-2019, 09:21 PM
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When I was a kid, EVERYWHERE in a restaurant was a smoking section. I don't remember exactly when non-smoking sections started to become a thing.

And I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned this yet (and apologies if I missed it): writing a check for, well, anything. I used to write several checks a week, now, it's maybe one a month, if at all. And it was common practice to write a check at the grocery store for 10 or 20 or 30 bucks over the amount you owed, just so you could get some cash.
My parents owned a restaurant in the 1970's and Minnesota had just enacted their clean-air regulations, one of the first in the nation. They fussed and fumed, because the (small) dining room really couldn't be easily divided. The only practical solution was to put nonsmokers in the rear, and the smokers in the prime seats in the front for the majority of their customers. And no one complained, and it was often disregarded anyway.

And you balanced your checkbook to the penny, writing down each check in a register and reconciling against the statement and the actual physical checks they returned to you. You had to remember to add in ten cents per check, which was their processing fee at the time. I haven't balanced a checkbook in ages, although I'm sure some still do so out of habit or necessity.

If you had a savings account, you had a passbook with your deposits and withdrawals and balance, updated by the teller. You had to bring the passbook with you if you wanted anything done. At least at that time, savings paid real interest and checking accounts never paid interest, so you kept as much money as possible in savings instead of checking, moving money around if you expected to write several checks.
  #140  
Old 09-03-2019, 10:06 PM
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I still refuse to acknowledge the turn of the century. As recently as 2000, I tried to smuggle my pet iguana through Logan airport because I didn't have anyone to take care of my junior T-Rex. I tried to explain to the very buxom security agent that she better be careful when she opened that pet carrier but she didn't listen. She opened it anyway and ended up with a giant lizard holding on to her boobs. She screamed, he bolted down the terminal and I had to run through security to catch him.

I would probably be shot for that today. Simpler times.
Yeah but at least now you have a story where you can mention her titties twice.
  #141  
Old 09-03-2019, 10:21 PM
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I think this has a lot more to do with people hating the way their bodies look, as opposed to any notion of being naked is shameful, or prudery.
And also I think people are more conscious now of the history of abuse that often targeted such communal-nudity situations. Parents became much more vigilant about situations where kids would be expected to take their clothes off, and consequently people who were more shielded from communal nudity as kids are less likely to be comfortable with communal nudity as adults.
  #142  
Old 09-04-2019, 12:27 AM
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How about: do you remember that thing with the roller and, carbon-like stuff I guess, that the retailer would slide back and forth across your credit card to get an impression of the raised text? I just noticed that the card we have mostly been using on this vacation trip does not have raised numbers and letters on it at all.
  #143  
Old 09-04-2019, 01:40 AM
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The anti-litter campaign actually began in the 1950s with the Keep America Beautiful campaign. There was a popular commercial on TV with the jingle, which went, as I recall:

Please, please, don't be a litterbug.
Oh, please, don't be a litterbug.
Please, please, don't be a litterbug.
Every litter bit hurts.

Cole Porter it wasn't.

The "Crying Indian" ad first appeared in the early Seventies (Iron Eyes Cody was actually an Italian-American actor named Espera Oscar de Corti who (falsely) claimed to be Native American) and was played so often for so many years, it's easy to see why people would think anti-littering campaigns began in the Seventies.

On a different subject, before copiers became relatively inexpensive in the 70s and 80s, teachers used mimeograph machines to make copies. Kids passing back fresh copies of tests and handouts almost invariably sniffed the pages. It was a singularly satisfying scent.
  #144  
Old 09-04-2019, 05:23 AM
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Originally Posted by nelliebly View Post
The "Crying Indian" ad first appeared in the early Seventies (Iron Eyes Cody was actually an Italian-American actor named Espera Oscar de Corti who (falsely) claimed to be Native American) and was played so often for so many years, it's easy to see why people would think anti-littering campaigns began in the Seventies.
I just watched that ad, and had either forgotten, or never realized, that the narrator is William Conrad.
  #145  
Old 09-04-2019, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
...And yes: boys and men didn't shave anything but their faces. Girls and women shaved their legs from the knees down, and armpits. Nobody shaved their crotches! That would have been considered really weird.
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Originally Posted by Zyada View Post
When I was dating in the early 80s and well into the 90s, it was considered kinky for a woman to shave her crotch.
Even more than weird or kinky : I distinctly remember my friends snickering at the thought of anyone shaving their crotches. The only reason why one would do that would be some sort of infestation. So, there was a hint of uncleanness about it.

Some time around the early 2000s, pubes started being considered as dirty. That's quite a 180° from my youth, though I hear there's been a (most welcome in my view) pushback against that trend recently.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Filbert View Post
Yeah. GPS and google maps are great to find the fastest way somewhere, but they don't have an option for 'a bit longer but probably cooler scenery'.
True, but if you know what your looking for, you can customize the itinerary provided by dragging it so that it includes the places you're interested in seeing. It then even calculates the distance and time for your personalized trip. That's pretty neat.
__________________
Mais je porte accroché au plus haut des entrailles
À la place où la foudre a frappé trop souvent
Un cœur où chaque mot a laissé son entaille
Et d’où ma vie s’égoutte au moindre mouvement
  #146  
Old 09-04-2019, 09:37 AM
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I remember when people lived in the real world. Nowadays, reality is irrelevant. The only thing that matters is what's on that damn screen. The whole world is supposed to stop because you got to read and respond to the latest text.
  #147  
Old 09-04-2019, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
And also I think people are more conscious now of the history of abuse that often targeted such communal-nudity situations. Parents became much more vigilant about situations where kids would be expected to take their clothes off, and consequently people who were more shielded from communal nudity as kids are less likely to be comfortable with communal nudity as adults.
Was/is abuse actually more common in communal nudity situations?

Presuming, of course, that the nudity itself isn't defined as abuse.
  #148  
Old 09-04-2019, 11:16 AM
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But here's the biggie for me - and the why-it-is. It just about fits the timeframe because it's a generational effect. Sports participation for kids is way down (in the UK at least - US also?). I see a real big drop off in the last 10 years, but I think the start of the phenomenon was the 80's and into the 90's. And the reason is this: this is the first generation of adolescents who, rather than getting involved in sports, sit in their bedrooms gaming - where their parents don't think this is unusual/unhealthy/unacceptable because it's exactly what they did as well.
I don't see that as the reason at all. What I do remember is that there was a moral panic of sorts in the early-mid 1980s with the abduction of Adam Walsh and other children, and this meant that parents got paranoid. Not so much the ones of children my age (born 1972) or older- they realized that this was more of a moral panic. But the parents whose first children were born from 1977 more or less onward came into parenthood with this moral panic in the forefront and were much less likely to let their children range freely.

Combine that with those of us who were a little older growing up with that moral panic info as a sort of fact of life, and 20+ years down the line, you have a couple of generations of parents whose conception of the world their children are growing up in is VERY different than that of their parents. I mean, when I was a kid in the suburbs, the expectation was that everyone was on the up-and-up and could be trusted. Not so anymore. I recall my parents just saying "Find us in about 20 minutes" and turning me loose at K-Mart or Target to go play the video game demos or look at the toys and sporting goods. Who would turn their 8 year old loose in a big box store these days? Nobody, that's who.

What I've noticed though, as a father of a couple of boys, is that parental involvement in stuff seems to be WAY down. I don't know if it's part of the general downturn in volunteerism, but it's frustrating to constantly end up doing stuff because nobody else is willing to step up, or when they do, to take it seriously and do a good job. Sports, Cub Scouts, PTA Dad's Club, you name it... people just sort of magically expect shit to get done without their involvement nowadays. Even lame stuff like getting the Cub Scout uniform stuff sewn or ironed on seems to be beyond the level of most people these days. Same for having their kids show up to sports practice on time or at all.
  #149  
Old 09-04-2019, 11:18 AM
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When I first started working in real estate, contracts for a married couple to buy a huse were traditionally written as "Joe Smith and H/W Mary" H/W meaning "his wife." Needless to say, I never wrote a contract like that, but always referred to Joe Smith and Mary Jones Smith.

And as for a woman getting a mortgage without a male co-signer, forget about it. There were tales of single working women earning good money having to take senile grandfathers our of nursing homes so they could sign a real estate contract, the only qualification being a Y-chromosome.
  #150  
Old 09-04-2019, 11:28 AM
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When I bought my house 20 years ago the mortgage papers were made out to "Smart Aleq, an unmarried woman" which I thought was kinda hilarious, especially since my son bought a house a few years later and it did NOT specify HIS marital status. I wonder if that's changed?
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