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  #151  
Old 08-14-2019, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Corry El View Post
....

Rent control is price fixing. Price fixing creates misallocation of resources and perverse incentives as compared to market price discovery. If the outcome of market pricing is judged unacceptably 'unfair', a subjective judgement call, then collecting taxes to subsidize people who cannot pay market prices is virtually always preferable to govt price fixing.
Not really. If the landlords are allowed to reset rents when a vacancy occurs, and are allowed to raise the rents a reasonable amount a year, then it's fluctuation control, not price fixing. That's how it is in San Jose. It just protects both sides from weird short term market fluctuations.
  #152  
Old 08-15-2019, 06:37 AM
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It protects certain lucky tenants from paying market rates, for sure. How does this system “protect” landlords?
  #153  
Old 08-15-2019, 08:20 AM
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This young lady is paying 69,000-yen a month for an 82-meter apartment in Tokyo. In the final minutes she says it is a bit high for the size but among other things, she likes the bed being in a loft rather than everything being in one tiny room, and they rent by the month rather than two-year leases like most places offer; her work-visa has to be renewed every months.
That also includes all utilities and internet - which is probably around Y12,000 a month - plus the contract is month-to-month with no key money required, and it's near a Yamanote Line station, which is -very- central Tokyo.

It's a pretty good deal all told. It's not just the size it's the location.
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Last edited by DragonAsh; 08-15-2019 at 08:21 AM.
  #154  
Old Yesterday, 12:14 AM
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I hear you. Tokyo made me emotionally preview what living while black in American might mean. I landed my first profession job in the early 1990's for a Swiss Investment Bank making about $80k/year. I didn't have a gaijin package but I could easily afford a $1500/month 6-mat apartment. My Japanese was not great, but I could cover the basics.

One place just freaked when I tried to walk in "no, no, no gaijin". Other's put up with me but knew it was a waste of time. One that found me a place would start out saying "I've got a special situation here. Works for a Swiss Investment Bank, has a guarantee from the bank, speaks some Japanese, nice guy, has the deposit ready, by the way is a gaijin (white guy). He landed my place and I was thankful.

Rental agency #1 also got a rock thru the window. Fuckin' A, I don't think I have ever been so pissed off in my life. Here I am with a professional job, cash and you won't even give me the time of day. And I did realize it was just a small taste of what many people of color live every day in the US. YMMV.
This exactly.

After have had lived in Japan on and off for several years over a ten-year period, I married a Japanese woman and moved to Japan in 1990. I've been in Asia since then. My wife and I lived with her parents for a year while we saved money.

I wasn't working for a foreign company, but I was working for a Japanese one. I was married to a Japanese. I had a guarantee from my Japanese father-in-law. I spoke close to fluent Japanese and could read and write Japanese.

We decided to move out on our own in about 1992ish. As you put it, Fuck'A. My wife was doing apartment shopping and would go someplace. They would look at some interesting places and she would ask if it would be a problem if her husband was a foreigner. “No problem.” Until I showed up in my light brown hair and hazel eyes. Suddenly there were absolutely no apartments to rent.

One realtor was very kind, explained it was difficult to find places and spent a while on the phone calling the realtors who represented the landlords only to get turned down a number of time.

One place in particular, I wanted to come back with a fucking shotgun. The bored realtor was reading a newspaper but jumped to attention when the bell on the door rang as we opened it. He saw me, his eyes went right back to the paper and he simply waved his hands in dismissal, as if shooing away a fly.

I also came away from that experience with a greater appreciation of what people of color experience.

I had a relationship for a while with a divorced woman I picked up in Roppongi. As her part of divorce, she had three or four apartments in central Tokyo which she was able to live off of. She wouldn’t rent to foreigners. She had absolutely no problem getting picked up and fucking them, she just wouldn’t rent to them.

I knew hundreds of foreigners in the 25 plus years I lived there. All of them were living in fixed abodes and not just crashing in the park, so people would find places.

I didn’t have any problem purchasing a house. I also had a couple of friends who made money by renting apartments and then subleasing them to foreigners.
  #155  
Old Yesterday, 12:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Ravenman View Post
At the expense of supply.

Is it a reasonable assumption on my part that your extremely narrow answer is intended to convey that in a city with high rents, you would prefer to cap the increases in rents, knowing that shortages of rental units is an easily foreseeable consequence; rather than increase supply, knowing that lower costs would logically follow?
How do you increase supply when the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks, and it's all already high rises (by US standards)? The total supply of living units isn't very manageable; you need to work on own/rent balance. Doing this has two facets: a cultural one which is long-term, and a price-based one which is short-term. One of the biggest, if not the biggest, problems with the AirBnB market is that the short-term rentals are prohibitive for anybody who doesn't have Daddy Corporate to pay for him and the long-term rentals are being replaced by short-term rentals, so the growth in the total rental market is actually lowering the amount of units available for "real renters".
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  #156  
Old Yesterday, 05:44 AM
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How do you increase supply when the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks, and it's all already high rises (by US standards)?
This describes zero cities in the US.
  #157  
Old Yesterday, 06:06 AM
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How do you increase supply when the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks, and it's all already high rises (by US standards)?
The places we are talking about is NOT already all high rises. Not even close. Go around the Bay Area and you see tons and tons of single family homes built just after World War II. I’m not talking about the parts of San Francisco like the Marina District or Nob Hill; look at the Sunset, most of Silicon Valley, most of the East Bay, etc. But for the most part, these communities have chosen policies that stop redevelopment of these neighborhoods.

Quote:
One of the biggest, if not the biggest, problems with the AirBnB market is that the short-term rentals are prohibitive for anybody who doesn't have Daddy Corporate to pay for him and the long-term rentals are being replaced by short-term rentals, so the growth in the total rental market is actually lowering the amount of units available for "real renters".
I agree. I have no issue with regulating homeshares, like limiting it to owner-occupied units.
  #158  
Old Yesterday, 11:16 AM
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It protects certain lucky tenants from paying market rates, for sure. How does this system “protect” landlords?
As I have said before, not a lot of landlords are savvy. They will kick out good solid tenants to chase new tenant with higher rents, not realizing that in a year, the cycle changes and rents will go down, and those rich dot.com guys will either have their own house or be broke. Thus they will have lost good solid clean tenants who have paid on time for five years to chase quick, cheap profits, and int he end, lose.
  #159  
Old Yesterday, 11:17 AM
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This describes zero cities in the US.
No, it more or less describes the entire SF bay area.
  #160  
Old Yesterday, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
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Originally Posted by Ruken View Post
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
How do you increase supply when the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks, and it's all already high rises (by US standards)?
This describes zero cities in the US.
No, it more or less describes the entire SF bay area.
I live in the bay area. Do you have any evidence for this?
  #161  
Old Yesterday, 11:26 AM
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https://haasinstitute.berkeley.edu/s...cisco-bay-area

According to this, 67% of Oakland's residential land is zoned for single-family homes, and 47% of Berkeley. Those are significant chunks of the bay area that are single-family only.
  #162  
Old Yesterday, 11:45 AM
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No, it more or less describes the entire SF bay area.
You've just severely discredited yourself. Nobody is going to believe anything you have to say about that region now.
  #163  
Old Yesterday, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by iiandyiiii View Post
https://haasinstitute.berkeley.edu/s...cisco-bay-area

According to this, 67% of Oakland's residential land is zoned for single-family homes, and 47% of Berkeley. Those are significant chunks of the bay area that are single-family only.
A third of the buildings in SF itself are single-family, and another 20% are 2-4 units. Although new construction is heavily biased toward units in 20+-unit buildings.
  #164  
Old Yesterday, 12:33 PM
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You've just severely discredited yourself. Nobody is going to believe anything you have to say about that region now.
Well, he’s said more redicilous things. Like that landlords are “protected” from getting rid of good tenants because rent control. The arguments have gotten sillier than the rents in Nob Hill.

ETA: but apparently only landlords in old housing units need such protection in San Jose, since only they are “protected” by rent control.

Last edited by Ravenman; Yesterday at 12:37 PM.
  #165  
Old Yesterday, 08:05 PM
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I live in the bay area. Do you have any evidence for this?

Well, it's not all high rises, but pretty much the the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks and greenbelts.
  #166  
Old Yesterday, 08:06 PM
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You've just severely discredited yourself. Nobody is going to believe anything you have to say about that region now.
I was referring to the "the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks" part. No, it's not all high rises.
  #167  
Old Yesterday, 08:08 PM
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Well, he’s said more redicilous things. Like that landlords are “protected” from getting rid of good tenants because rent control....
That's what the landlord representatives on the Rent board said, and also the tri-county landlord association.



Landlords and owners made that claim.
  #168  
Old Today, 05:05 AM
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That's what the landlord representatives on the Rent board said, and also the tri-county landlord association.



Landlords and owners made that claim.
Let me guess: you saw it on TV one time.
  #169  
Old Today, 05:34 AM
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
I was referring to the "the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks" part. No, it's not all high rises.
Well that's not how English works. But then we are in agreement that my post was correct: "the only land left unbuilt is streets and parks, and it's all already high rises (by US standards)" describes zero cities in the US.
  #170  
Old Today, 10:57 AM
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Let me guess: you saw it on TV one time.
No, several times at the meetings of the San Jose Commission meetings, where I was a member.
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