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Old 03-28-2020, 08:03 PM
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When was the last time you had a good martini?


Iíve lately been craving a martini, not something I make myself, but a really good one at 5 pm in a happy hour bar.

Iíve been drinking mainly beer and Jack Daniels over the past few months.

Iím sure my craving is due to being isolated in my apartment and missing the social interaction at a good happy hour.

Anyone else feeling the same way? Iím sure a lot of us are having similar odd cravings.
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Old 03-28-2020, 08:53 PM
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Not really a martini guy most of the time (although the wife is) but it has been weeks since I've made myself a decent* Manhattan. (Note: We use oversize cocktail glasses, so these are really doubles.)

* - Decent Manhattan

3.5 jiggers good rye (Pikesville, Crown Royal Northern Harvest, Sazerac, etc.)
1 jigger Dolin red vermouth
3-4 dashes bitters (Angostura, Peychaud's)

Stir over ice. Strain into glass. Garnish with 3 cherries and a dollop of cherry juice from the jar. Fancy-ass people go for Luxardo cherries, but I like the plain and simple maraschino cherries put out by my local supermarket.)

Maybe tomorrow.
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:45 PM
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A real martini is made up overwhelmingly of gin, to which a rather small amount of dry vermouth and a garnish is added.

I've tasted gin, including the well-respected Bombay blue stuff. I've accidentally licked some Pine Sol from my fingers when washing the floor. It's a close contest. I really don't care for the taste of gin.

Hence in my book there is no such thing as a "good martini".


Now, like lots of other people who've attended parties in the last decade, I've been served a few "appletinis" and the like, nearly always made from vodka and apertifs or liqueurs and often as not, a spritz of seltzer. Some are kind of nice. They should not be confused with martinis. The people who actually like the things would probably agree with me there.
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Old 03-28-2020, 10:49 PM
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Never had a martini. I've had gin, a long time ago. I recall once reading someone describing a martini as tasting like hairspray. I'll probably never find out for myself.
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Old 03-28-2020, 11:03 PM
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Never had a martini. I've had gin, a long time ago. I recall once reading someone describing a martini as tasting like hairspray. I'll probably never find out for myself.
ĎThe perfect martini tastes like a cloud, almost like it isnít there.í I donít remember what book that line is from but thatís my description of a good martini.
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Old 03-29-2020, 03:04 PM
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A great martini seems to always be in a constant struggle against the martini glass. No matter the ingredients, a martini needs to be cold. And no matter how cold you get the drink, the shape and thinness of the glass seem to be optimized to warm the drink. Even if you freeze the glass, it simply doesn't have the thermal mass to make much of a difference. So the first few sips of a cold martini are heaven, the rest tastes like the warm tears of disappointment.
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Old 03-29-2020, 03:42 PM
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A straight-up martini should be consumed within a few minutes, so as not to lose that essential chill.

If you want to sip your drink slowly over a period of time, order a freakin’ mint julep.
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Old 03-29-2020, 03:56 PM
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Also — absolutely no reason not to make a martini at home. There’s no alchemy involved.

Put your cocktail glass in the freezer for 5-10 minutes. Put a lot of ice cubes in a mixing glass, add a few drops of dry vermouth (or to taste), pour in 3 oz (or to taste) of your favorite gin. Stir briskly and strain into your frozen glass, over a green manzanilla olive stuffed with an anchovy (or your personal favorite olive confection, or a lemon twist, or a pickled cocktail onion, which makes it a Gibson). Consume within a few minutes.

Alternative: put the booze and ice into a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for several seconds. I prefer this method because it yields the absolute coldest martini. Some purists prefer stirring, which gives you a clearer, prettier, more transparent cocktail. I will happily drink a slightly cloudy, colder martini.
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Old 03-29-2020, 04:04 PM
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A great martini seems to always be in a constant struggle against the martini glass. No matter the ingredients, a martini needs to be cold. And no matter how cold you get the drink, the shape and thinness of the glass seem to be optimized to warm the drink. Even if you freeze the glass, it simply doesn't have the thermal mass to make much of a difference. So the first few sips of a cold martini are heaven, the rest tastes like the warm tears of disappointment.
A restaurant we occasionally go to makes a damn fine martini. The martini glass when served is maybe 1/3 full (probably less given the shape of the glass) of martini, plus the skewered olives -- hand-stuffed with bleu cheese if you like (I do). They also give you a brandy snifter with crushed ice. Nestled in that ice is a small carafe with the remainer of your cocktail. Drink what's in the glass, and pour more cold martini as needed.
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Old 03-29-2020, 04:23 PM
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Old 03-29-2020, 05:29 PM
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A straight-up martini should be consumed within a few minutes, so as not to lose that essential chill.
As are all non-rocked cocktails. Letting them warm up is an Abomination Unto Nuggan. If you want to sip, drink a beer.
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Old 03-30-2020, 12:24 PM
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I've discovered that the homeopathic quantities of vermouth insisted upon by so many aficionados are - to my palate - essentially pointless. A Dry Martini originally meant that the vermouth was dry, not that the drink was almost entirely composed of gin. Not often the case now, admittedly, but I don't advocate it out of a sense of tradition: it's purely about taste. I've tried the various bits of accepted wisdom - drinking gin while there's some vermouth elsewhere in the street, brutally stabbing anyone who suggests shaking, twisting lemon peel over the surface to spritz the drink with lemon oil while sneering at those who use olives - but I've discovered that the old-school 2:1 ratio specified in the Savoy Cocktail Book is right on the money for me. Cocktails are about balanced flavours: I want to taste the vermouth as well as the gin, because otherwise...well then it's not a pleasing mixture, to me, it's pretty much just gin. Oh, and I shake the living bejeezus out of it.

- 2oz Tanqueray (a piney, juniper-forward gin)
- 1oz Noilly Prat vermouth
- maybe a dash of orange bitters, though be careful - some are quite intensely orangey and completely take over
- Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass - stirring gives a slightly oilier mouthfeel; there's a crispness that comes from shaking which I just can't replicate with a stir
- As many pimento-stuffed olives as I can get on a spike and still submerge: four, generally, regardless of the occasional superstition about even numbers which you might encounter.

I'm hard pressed to find a bar where I can get such a thing, so no, I don't miss a 5pm professionally prepared Martini! I would absolutely love it if I could though...

Last edited by Yorkshire Pudding; 03-30-2020 at 12:25 PM.
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Old 03-30-2020, 12:46 PM
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Make mine a Gibson. I don't like olives, gimme those cocktail onions marinated in booze.
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Old 03-30-2020, 01:01 PM
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Never had one in my life. What am I missing?
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Old 03-30-2020, 01:18 PM
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I tried various Gin's and found they were all over the map in terms of flavour. Ended up choosing Hendrick's... 4 parts gin, 1 part vermouth. A very good cocktail. And yeah, everything has to be chilled.
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Old 03-30-2020, 02:12 PM
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Someone on The Dope (I want to say Bricker) turned me on to Citadelle Gin for martinis. I like:

2 cups Gin
1/2 cup Dry Vermouth (Dolin is my preferred)
2 Tablespoons water (to simulate the ice that melts durng mixing)

Pour the above into a bottle (I use a 1 liter old Club soda bottle.) and keep it in the freezer. Ice cold martinis on demand.

Lent is almost over my friends.
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Old 03-30-2020, 02:12 PM
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Not really a martini guy most of the time (although the wife is) but it has been weeks since I've made myself a decent* Manhattan. (Note: We use oversize cocktail glasses, so these are really doubles.)

* - Decent Manhattan

3.5 jiggers good rye (Pikesville, Crown Royal Northern Harvest, Sazerac, etc.)
1 jigger Dolin red vermouth
3-4 dashes bitters (Angostura, Peychaud's)

Stir over ice. Strain into glass. Garnish with 3 cherries and a dollop of cherry juice from the jar. Fancy-ass people go for Luxardo cherries, but I like the plain and simple maraschino cherries put out by my local supermarket.)

Maybe tomorrow.

Martinis and Manhattans are close cousins, if not half-brothers, in that they're both essentially a 2:1 or higher spirit to vermouth with bitters cocktail, at least on paper. (the Martini is classically a 1:1 or higher gin to vermouth ratio with orange bitters).

Personally, I don't care for Martinis. But I really enjoy a 2:1 Manhattan, especially one made with say... Rittenhouse Rye, Carpano Antica and Bitter Truth Jerry Thomas' decanter bitters.
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Old 03-30-2020, 03:27 PM
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[But I really enjoy a 2:1 Manhattan, especially one made with say... Rittenhouse Rye, Carpano Antica and Bitter Truth Jerry Thomas' decanter bitters.[/QUOTE]

Ooh, I hear that. Rittenhouse is a good, good call. I tend to have Martini Rosso in as a staple, with various others taking guest roles as they catch my eye; I don't know Carpano Antica though. Tasting notes?

Good call again on the Bitter Truth Jerry Thomas; that's in the rotation, as is their Aromatic bitters. And Angostura...there's always Angostura.
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Old 03-30-2020, 03:33 PM
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Someone on The Dope (I want to say Bricker) turned me on to Citadelle Gin for martinis. I like:

2 cups Gin
1/2 cup Dry Vermouth (Dolin is my preferred)
2 Tablespoons water (to simulate the ice that melts durng mixing)
Dolin's good stuff, aye. Don't know Citadelle at all, but gin's massive news in the UK these days, so it might be findable. What's it like? Tanqueray's my preferred Martini gin, with Noilly Prat vermouth (which I think I remember reading is a different recipe for the US market from what they ship everywhere else?). I've a bottle of Dolin too, but I find that pairs better with Plymouth gin - all in all a lighter, more fragrant and citrus affair.
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Old 03-30-2020, 03:42 PM
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Citadelle is a botanical gin, definitely not dry. It's also French.

I know. I know. "French gin? That's like French beer!" Trust me - it's great in Martinis. Gimlets, too.

Last edited by Maus Magill; 03-30-2020 at 03:45 PM.
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Old 03-30-2020, 03:46 PM
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Never had one in my life. What am I missing?
It's rather like being hit on the back of the head with a velvet-covered nightstick, but more expensive.

As perhaps you've guessed, I don't drink martinis. I am with AHunter3 - if that was a good martini, then that is how it is supposed to taste, and it isn't going to get better. I would rather spend my liver cells drinking something I enjoy.

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Old 03-30-2020, 05:16 PM
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If I'm going to make myself a Martini instead of a Manhattan, the likely recipe will contain Aviation gin, Dolin vermouth and some boutique stuffed olive, like the jar of Alien Fresh Jerky (Baker, CA) Sicilian-Style Habanero-Flavored Garlic Stuffed Jumbo olives I just found in the fridge. Shaken until frosty and imbibed before it gets tepid.

Maybe to celebrate Friday....
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Old 03-30-2020, 05:31 PM
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If I'm going to make myself a Martini instead of a Manhattan, the likely recipe will contain Aviation gin, Dolin vermouth and some boutique stuffed olive, like the jar of Alien Fresh Jerky (Baker, CA) Sicilian-Style Habanero-Flavored Garlic Stuffed Jumbo olives I just found in the fridge. Shaken until frosty and imbibed before it gets tepid.

Maybe to celebrate Friday....
A worthwhile cause for celebration. I use them to celebrate Saturdays. One of my very favourite pastimes is baking pizzas while drinking Martinis and listening to the Craig Charles Funk & Soul Show. Fridays for me however are heralded by Manhattans, Friday Night Rocks on Planet Rock and - more often than not - deep frying something.
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Old 03-30-2020, 06:25 PM
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Celebrated Monday with a Manhattan: 3 parts Quarterhorse rye, 1 part Dolin vermouth, Peychauds bitters, 3 cherries cuz that's how I roll.
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Old 03-30-2020, 08:16 PM
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Last time I had a good martini? I just made myself one. 3:1 Tanguray to Lejon vermouth, and 3 olives(I usually do 4, but I gove up one for Lent )

Quote:
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A real martini is made up overwhelmingly of gin, to which a rather small amount of dry vermouth and a garnish is added.

I've tasted gin, including the well-respected Bombay blue stuff. I've accidentally licked some Pine Sol from my fingers when washing the floor. It's a close contest. I really don't care for the taste of gin.

Hence in my book there is no such thing as a "good martini".
Try it with Tanguray #10. It's an extremely citrusy gin.
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Old 03-30-2020, 09:03 PM
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Iím sure my craving is due to being isolated in my apartment and missing the social interaction at a good happy hour.
Arggggh! A healthy-yet-fun restaurant near us has a wonderful (and long: 3-6:30) Happy Hour. Really creative (yet cheap!) house cocktails.

A friend texted me today, "Happy Hour in 15?"

Then followed it with "Crap, I forgot for a second! Ummm, in June?"


My problem is I don't have the ingredients or experience to make a stellar Manhattan or an Old Fashioned that's half as good as I'm used to getting. So I'm sticking to simple drinks like my classic "Splash Some Bourbon And Bitters Into A Ginger Beer". (or Diet Coke)
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Old 03-30-2020, 09:27 PM
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Arggggh! A healthy-yet-fun restaurant near us has a wonderful (and long: 3-6:30) Happy Hour. Really creative (yet cheap!) house cocktails.

A friend texted me today, "Happy Hour in 15?"

Then followed it with "Crap, I forgot for a second! Ummm, in June?"


My problem is I don't have the ingredients or experience to make a stellar Manhattan or an Old Fashioned that's half as good as I'm used to getting. So I'm sticking to simple drinks like my classic "Splash Some Bourbon And Bitters Into A Ginger Beer". (or Diet Coke)
Can you get them to go? LOL, but a lot of our area's restaurants have been permitted to sell beer and wine to go along with their food orders. Don't think it extends to spirits though, and not in your area anyway. Bummer.

I hope we will be able to go to restaurants again by June.
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Old 03-30-2020, 10:00 PM
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I'll second Aviation Gin (makes a GREAT GnT) Deadpool did well in buying into that company. I also like Hendricks, and when I'm slumming New Amsterdam.

I like it dirty, gin stored in the freezer, and because they're absolutely nobody to judge me, I'll throw a couple of ice cubes in with the mix to keep it cooler longer. If you must put the gin in a shaker, swirl, don't shake...otherwise you might as well have made a Vodka martini.

I recall having a couple exceptional martinis..some in restaurants as a vendor was spending a couple hundred dollars to get us to spend a couple million on their product. Had a couple great ones at Golf courses (I don't golf). A few really remarkable ones had bleu cheese olives...and I'm betting they made them themselves as every storebought Bleu Cheese Olive I've found thusfar has been lacking.
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Old 03-30-2020, 10:01 PM
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...
- 1oz Noilly Prat vermouth
...
In my opinion, this is the key to an excellent martini: Noilly Prat dry vermouth. As long as you're using a decent gin (Tanqueray, Bombay Sapphire, or even Beefeater or Gordon's in a pinch), the Noilly Prat will bring out the best in the gin.
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Old 03-30-2020, 11:18 PM
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Try it with Tanguray #10. It's an extremely citrusy gin.
I'm pretty sure I've tried Tanqueray gin. Dunno about numbers. I really on a fundamental level don't want to put something that tastes like juniper greenery into my mouth. It's just not a taste for which I have any appreciation. Totally tastes like an industrial cleaning product to me.

Oddly, I use juniper berries in small amounts in some of my cooking. It's a different taste. Even then I wouldn't want it except muddled up into a composite of other tastes.
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Old 03-31-2020, 08:04 AM
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My problem is I don't have the ingredients or experience to make a stellar Manhattan or an Old Fashioned that's half as good as I'm used to getting...[/I]
Swirl a little sugar and water together in the bottom of an Old Fashioned glass until dissolved. Add a splash of Peychaudís bitters (Angostura if itís all you got). Fill glass with ice, add rye or bourbon. Top with a splash of seltzer and a twist of lemon peel. Itís an Old Fashioned. The best barkeep in the world couldnít do it any better than you just did.

(I dislike the ďgarbage,Ē as itís called, but you can put in an orange slice and maraschino cherry if you must)
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:07 AM
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For an Old Fashioned they say a sugar cube, but that's way too much for me. I choose a tasty (not smooth) bourbon like Woodford Reserve.

And I like the orange (peel) flavour, so I cut the peel (be sure not to get the pith, which is bitter) and mash the oils in the bottom of the glass as your first step.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:08 AM
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I'm pretty sure I've tried Tanqueray gin. Dunno about numbers. I really on a fundamental level don't want to put something that tastes like juniper greenery into my mouth. It's just not a taste for which I have any appreciation. Totally tastes like an industrial cleaning product to me.

Oddly, I use juniper berries in small amounts in some of my cooking. It's a different taste. Even then I wouldn't want it except muddled up into a composite of other tastes.
Hendricks is a very un-junipery gin. Tastes like cucumbers to me. Tasty, you might like it.

You won't like Junipero Gin, which pegs the needle for juniper, in a delightful way. Sipsmith's VJOP might have more juniper flavor, but is hot and clumsy by comparison. And costs a bit more.

The mention of Aviation Gin is a great one, IMHO. I like Martin Miller's as well for Martinis.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:37 AM
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I don't know Carpano Antica though. Tasting notes?
Carpano Antica is essentially the original sweet vermouth. It's more intense than say.. Martini and Rossi or other standard vermouths- more bitter, more aromatic, more body, etc...

I love the stuff- other vermouths seem kind of insipid by comparison. But others consider it too intense for cocktails, and best used for spritzers and other vermouth uses.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:46 AM
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Swirl a little sugar and water together in the bottom of an Old Fashioned glass until dissolved. Add a splash of Peychaudís bitters (Angostura if itís all you got). Fill glass with ice, add rye or bourbon. Top with a splash of seltzer and a twist of lemon peel. Itís an Old Fashioned. The best barkeep in the world couldnít do it any better than you just did.

(I dislike the ďgarbage,Ē as itís called, but you can put in an orange slice and maraschino cherry if you must)
Thanks much, Ike and K, I'll give it a try.

I grew up having hundreds of my dad's Classic Wisconsin Old Fashioneds, and there was plenty of "garbage". I swear he made them mostly because they were a lot of work (and yes, we had to stand back while he was 'engineering' them). He had a wooden pestle and would muddle a little sugar, orange peel, lemon zest and a cherry, add a lot of bitters (Angostura was all we knew back in the day) and Korbel brandy. Topped with a splash of Graf's 50/50 (a grapefruit/lime soda... Squirt comes close).

Damn thing was almost too sweet, but it quickly became one of my "comfort foods". And easy to find in Wisconsin; I've been touring bars and supper clubs comparing them. You can order one Sweet, Sour or Press. Found a local joint that torches the orange peel for a smoky, caramelized note.

Now, to be honest, the rye or bourbon versions are more upscale (local barkeep says the Maker's Mark distillery serves a great one... road trip!). And I'm comparing the various bitters made by Bittercube, but still love Angostura.


Side note: grew up with my parents pausing for "cocktail Hour" every day. Mom drank martinis, and I just hated gin. But loved the "brown booze" dad drank.
Those tastes have held through adulthood. I've tried to like gin, ma, I just can't!
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Old 03-31-2020, 10:16 AM
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I'm pretty sure I've tried Tanqueray gin. Dunno about numbers.
Tanqueray is very junipery, Tanqueray No.10 is a different beast. You could go back to the beginnings of the Martini concept and have a crack at Plymouth though: it's still got juniper in (it's gin, after all) but it's much lighter and more citrus. It's what was specified in some of the earliest formulations of what was ultimately to be codified as the Martini, and early recipes were less of a gin-heavy mix too. 2:1 gin:vermouth, sometimes even 1:1.

But...if you don't like juniper then the obvious answer - which I believe you've already discovered - is to not drink gin!

Last edited by Yorkshire Pudding; 03-31-2020 at 10:16 AM.
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Old 03-31-2020, 10:25 AM
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Carpano Antica is essentially the original sweet vermouth. It's more intense than say.. Martini and Rossi or other standard vermouths- more bitter, more aromatic, more body, etc...

I love the stuff- other vermouths seem kind of insipid by comparison. But others consider it too intense for cocktails, and best used for spritzers and other vermouth uses.
That sounds spectacular. If you're not careful, Martini can make quite a sweet and sickly Manhattan if used alongside a whiskey without a bit of power and spice. That could be just the ticket.

So yes, I'm going to get me some of that! Just had a quick check around a few of the mail-order booze companies and it looks quite available. Thanks for the tip!

Last edited by Yorkshire Pudding; 03-31-2020 at 10:26 AM.
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Old 03-31-2020, 10:30 AM
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digs @35: Cheese; sausage; beer; bizarre Old Fashioneds....sometimes I feel Wisconsin is the true heart of the Civilized World.
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Old 03-31-2020, 10:33 AM
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Swirl a little sugar and water together in the bottom of an Old Fashioned glass until dissolved. Add a splash of Peychaudís bitters (Angostura if itís all you got). Fill glass with ice, add rye or bourbon. Top with a splash of seltzer and a twist of lemon peel. Itís an Old Fashioned. The best barkeep in the world couldnít do it any better than you just did.

(I dislike the ďgarbage,Ē as itís called, but you can put in an orange slice and maraschino cherry if you must)
The cherry's involvement depends on my mood, but since I discovered proper Luxardo maraschino cherries (rather than the neon red things in watery syrup I used to routinely get), they work their way in more often than they used to.

Orange though...I think the aroma of orange peel is a pretty important element of the experience for me, so I do that rather than the lemon twist. That or a dehydrated orange slice; the orange juice part of the garbage isn't that welcome.
  #40  
Old 03-31-2020, 12:27 PM
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Yeah, I kind of miss being able to spend an evening at a bar. I don't miss the screwballs that typically inhabit them, though.

Years ago, I spent a few months trying to make martinis at home. My twist was to shake them in small canning jars (the kind with the hinged lid and rubber seal) that I’d used to store black pepper kernels and coffee beans. Each jar was coated inside with a fragrant, oily film, some of which ended up in the martini.
  #41  
Old 03-31-2020, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Gray Ghost View Post
Can you get them to go? LOL, but a lot of our area's restaurants have been permitted to sell beer and wine to go along with their food orders. Don't think it extends to spirits though, and not in your area anyway. Bummer.

I hope we will be able to go to restaurants again by June.
Several of our local Mexican places are offering curbside pickup with $5 Margarita Specials. It's what's going to get us through these troubling times.
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Old 03-31-2020, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
digs @35: Cheese; sausage; beer; bizarre Old Fashioneds....sometimes I feel Wisconsin is the true heart of the Civilized World.
Don't forget bratwurst! And we can make drinks with dark Door County* cherries. Those day-glo cherries are indeed a crime against nature and home bartenders.

*That little pinkie that sticks up into Lake Michigan... it's our Maritime Province.


Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Several of our local Mexican places are offering curbside pickup with $5 Margarita Specials. It's what's going to get us through these troubling times.
Oh, wait, right now I wish I were in SoCal. We do not have enough good Mexican joints, or seafood.
  #43  
Old 03-31-2020, 08:44 PM
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...or seafood.
A big platter of panfried lake perch on a Friday night almost makes up for that.
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  #44  
Old 04-01-2020, 12:27 AM
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Several of our local Mexican places are offering curbside pickup with $5 Margarita Specials. It's what's going to get us through these troubling times.
I was going to say that's far more civilized than what we have. Surely Texas hasn't seen fit to allow spirits for takeout? But I see that Chuy's---they of the shrine to Elvis Presley and the hubcaps on the ceiling---are offering margarita kits for pickup or curbside. Which, unlike those abominations that Taco Cabana is selling, actually involves tequila. Well done.

Not the same as their luscious adult smoothies from their margarita machine, but much, much better than nothing. I hope this option continues long after the virus is a sad, hated memory.

Thanks all, for the ingredients discussion. I look forward to trying many of these different vermouths and cocktails.
  #45  
Old 04-10-2020, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
Carpano Antica is essentially the original sweet vermouth. It's more intense than say.. Martini and Rossi or other standard vermouths- more bitter, more aromatic, more body, etc...

I love the stuff- other vermouths seem kind of insipid by comparison. But others consider it too intense for cocktails, and best used for spritzers and other vermouth uses.
So, today, this happened. While I continued to dig the garden, my wife went to the supermarket. She's NHS staff so has priority some mornings, but this was just daytime hours, so I offered to go...but I reckon she thought I'd be handier with a shovel and barrow than she would, so she bid me stay home.

I'd recently seen off a bottle of rye so put it on the list; most were sold out, but they had Jack Daniel's Rye. It's not all that and a bag of chips, but any old port in a storm. I've just been made redundant, thanks to my employer being unlikely to weather the current storm without monumental scything of staff, so she took it upon herself to get me a present: a bottle of Carpano Antica which she happened to find in the booze section.

She had absolutely no idea that I'd been having this conversation about vermouth, and had never heard of Carpano before she saw it today.

It just caught her eye.
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