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  #51  
Old 07-16-2018, 06:51 PM
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John Mace John Mace is online now
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Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
It's not even a rule of thumb in North America either. For example we would say "New York" wins the world series, and also "The Red Sox win the world series."
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"The police" is plural, so "are" is conventional. If you said "the police department" it would be singular..."is investigating".
Right. The singular of Police is Policeman or Police Officer or something along those lines. You would never say "A police came to my house yesterday".
  #52  
Old 07-16-2018, 07:56 PM
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I don't think that "Aldi's" is actually an example of the greengrocer's apostrophe. The greengrocer's apostrophe is a use of the apostrophe in forming a plural, like "Apple's 10 cents a bushel". But calling the discount grocery chain "Aldi's" reflects an assumption that the store was founded by someone named Aldi, and that it is thus his store (a fairly common pattern in American store names; a grocery store near me is named "Sapell's", presumably because it's owned by the Sapell family). So the apostrophe in "Aldi's" would indicate a possessive, and so would be correct, if that were the store's name.
The chain was founded by Theo and Karl Albrecht. Your assumption seems to be ill founded and it is really a greengrocer's apostrophe after all.
  #53  
Old 07-16-2018, 08:21 PM
Chessic Sense Chessic Sense is offline
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I've never taken a "mathematic" course in the US. It's always "mathematics." So which makes more sense as an abbreviation of mathematics, "math" or "maths"?
..."math."

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The chain was founded by Theo and Karl Albrecht. Your assumption seems to be ill founded and it is really a greengrocer's apostrophe after all.
The assumption is ill founded, but that doesn't make it a greengrocer's apostrophe. That's his point. Or her point. Their point, anyway.
  #54  
Old 07-16-2018, 09:23 PM
excavating (for a mind) excavating (for a mind) is offline
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Well, they had an extra 's' sitting around after they removed it from 'sports'. Had to go somewhere I guess.
We use both "sports"and "sport" in British english whereas we pretty much never use the word "math"
I suspect the frequency at which the word "sport" is used (instead of "sports") is close to the frequency at which the word "maths" is used. That is, you use up all the extra "s" letters with "maths" that you have to resort to using "sports" on occasion.
  #55  
Old 07-17-2018, 02:15 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is online now
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Originally Posted by excavating (for a mind) View Post
I suspect the frequency at which the word "sport" is used (instead of "sports") is close to the frequency at which the word "maths" is used. That is, you use up all the extra "s" letters with "maths" that you have to resort to using "sports" on occasion.
I know this is all incidental, knockabout stuff but......I think you'd be very wrong.

The incidence of using "math" is vanishingly small to zero, "sports" however is used as a matter of course.

e.g. My daughter had her school "sports" day just yesterday and very much enjoyed it. I'd say that both her and my son have tried many "sports" and are settling on the few that they like. I was watching TV just now and the "sports" reporter covered the World cup final, The Tour de France and Wimbledon final. My hiking hat "sports" a rather fine zipped pocket. My two friends were pranked at work but as good "sports" they took in in good humour.

I couldn't honestly write a similar paragraph for the use of "math" in Britain.
  #56  
Old 07-17-2018, 09:02 AM
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I think the point is that athletic endeavors are discussed much more often than applied logic, and that thus, even when you move an S over to every instance of the latter (converting it from "math" to "maths"), there are still some Ss left over, and so not every "sports" can be converted to "sport".

EDIT:
Oh, and the American usage treats "sport" as a countable noun, and in addition treats "sports" as an uncountable noun. In American English, one might say "Football is a sport", or "Football, baseball, and basketball are the three biggest American sports". That's a countable noun, with normal singular and plural forms. On the other hand, we might also say "Terry Bradshaw is a sports commentator", even though the only sport he commentates on is football. Or "ESPN is a sports network", where here it refers to many different sports. Or one person might ask another "Were you in sports in high school?", even though the respondant might well have only been in one. It's my understanding that a Brit would use "sport" in these contexts, rather than "sports"

Last edited by Chronos; 07-17-2018 at 09:10 AM.
  #57  
Old 07-17-2018, 09:10 AM
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Keep in mind that English and American English are not exactly the same language. I'm slightly irked by the way the English say "schedule" with a soft "C" instead of the "K" sound, but I keep in mind the old saying, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do."
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  #58  
Old 07-18-2018, 01:43 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is online now
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
I think the point is that athletic endeavors are discussed much more often than applied logic, and that thus, even when you move an S over to every instance of the latter (converting it from "math" to "maths"), there are still some Ss left over, and so not every "sports" can be converted to "sport".
Oh, yeah. That'd make sense.

Quote:
EDIT:
Oh, and the American usage treats "sport" as a countable noun, and in addition treats "sports" as an uncountable noun. In American English, one might say "Football is a sport", or "Football, baseball, and basketball are the three biggest American sports". That's a countable noun, with normal singular and plural forms. On the other hand, we might also say "Terry Bradshaw is a sports commentator", even though the only sport he commentates on is football. Or "ESPN is a sports network", where here it refers to many different sports. Or one person might ask another "Were you in sports in high school?", even though the respondant might well have only been in one. It's my understanding that a Brit would use "sport" in these contexts, rather than "sports"
No, we'd use "sports" as well (as likely as not). Certainly to these average UK ears those usages sound perfectly fine.
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