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Old 01-27-2020, 03:22 AM
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What is your favorite household tip or technique?


I recently had an invasion of tiny flying insects and I started a thread asking for help how to get rid of them. Sure enough, you Dopers proved to be a great source of knowledge and I am especially grateful to Davidm for suggesting the winning technique of pouring a pot of boiling water down my sink drains several times per day for several days in a row to stop their breeding cycle. A neighbor suggested I add one tablespoon full of bleach to each pot just before I poured. It worked great.

It ocurred to me that it might be valuable to find other household tips, tricks and techniques and put them into a thread or organize them somehow to make a resource. I tried to search TSD for other household tips but they were somewhat difficult to find. So I decided to start this thread to ask you to post your favorite household techniques and tips so they may be of value to other people who frequent this forum. Here is a link to the thread that describes my insect infestation and the help I got:

https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=887924

Please feel free to post your favorite household tips and techniques here. I will post the tip that helped me get rid of my insect problem here now:

I recently suffered an infestation of tiny flying insects in my home. I had never seen these kinds of bugs before. They were about one tenth the size of an average household fly and I searched the net to try and determine exactly what kind of bugs they were. As best as I can tell, they were either gnats or fruit flies. But I doubt they were fruit flies because when one of them would land on my arm, I would try to swat it. But they were too fast. So fast, I never killed a single one until I sprayed the room with Raid and then a few minutes later, they slowed down considerably and I was then able to swat them. Fruit flies are just not that fast.

Davidm suggested I pour a pot of boiling water down my sink drains several times a day and to do that for several days in a row in order to disrupt their breeding cycle. I started doing that when a neighbor suggested I add one tablespoon full of household bleach to the water just before I poured it down the drain. That did the trick! After adding the bleach, a few days later, they were all gone. It has been almost a week now and I have not seen a single bug in the past 4 days.

Please post your favorite household tips and techniques here?
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Old 01-27-2020, 09:33 AM
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Dish detergent for removing greasy stains on anything, including oily hair.
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Old 01-27-2020, 09:51 AM
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Dish detergent for removing greasy stains on anything, including oily hair.
Especially Dawn dishwashing detergent. Also mix it with hydrogen peroxide in a spray bottle. Takes out pet vomit stains.
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Old 01-27-2020, 10:15 AM
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I'm not sure if these are household tips but they are cooking tips that I do in my household!

I no longer boil lasagna noodles before constructing the lasagna. I just layer them right from the box. I've never had an issue with them not cooking. Trying to handle hot, slimy noodles that would sometimes fall apart was always a pain.

Another pasta tip: I just recently started cooking pasta in the microwave instead of on the stovetop. Just put the pasta in a large microwave-safe bowl, put in enough water to cover the pasta, add 5 minutes to the stovetop cooking time and done. No more steamy kitchen from all of the boiling water and it takes a little less time because you don't have to wait for the water to come to a boil before you put the noodles/pasta in the water.
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Old 01-27-2020, 10:52 AM
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On the OPs subject of drain flies, I had these for quite a while. I knew they were coming from the bathroom since thats where they mostly were (never found them in the kitchen).

I eventually bought this product, used it once and that was about 2 months ago. Since then I think I've only had 1 drain fly. I'm very happy with it.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Green-Go...FG32/306195419
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Last edited by Wesley Clark; 01-27-2020 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 01-27-2020, 11:09 AM
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Other household tips I like

- buy a cheap block of melamine sponges on ebay, they're only about ten cents each if you buy 50 or 100. They help with cleaning the bathroom and kitchen, and you can throw them out when done.

- microfiber cloths are superior for cleaning dust (well known, but important)

- baby wipes are superior to napkins when cleaning your face and hands. Best to use both though, wipes first and napkin second.

- remote control outlets are nice. I use them to turn on and off air purifiers, christmas tree lights, regular lights and fans. They seem to max out at five outlets, but thats about all you need usually.

https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/sto...ght-switch-set

- if you heat a bowl of water and vinegar in the microwave, it makes it easier to clean it out afterwards.
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Old 01-27-2020, 11:12 AM
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Put a piece of saran wrap over your opened ice cream to prevent getting ice crystals on it.
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Old 01-27-2020, 12:26 PM
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I’m not tall and easily forget to clean the top of things like the stacked washer/dryer. When I finally remember, it’s an unholy mess to clean up.
Now I stretch cling wrap across to cover the entire top. Carefully fold back any bits visible from below. Now when I am remembering to clean it, it’s as easy as changing the cling wrap. Genius!
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Old 01-27-2020, 01:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wesley Clark View Post
...

- if you heat a bowl of water and vinegar in the microwave, it makes it easier to clean it out afterwards.
Yes, vinegar is a wonderful cleaner/disinfectant and will dissolve calcium and other hard-water deposits. I bought a jug of double-strength cleaning vinegar and cleaned the:
- microwave
- shower head
- dishwasher
- kettle
- coffee maker
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Old 01-27-2020, 02:19 PM
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Clean as you go. Much much easier to keep something clean than to let it go and try to play catch-up. I'd say this also applies to vehicles as well.
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Old 01-27-2020, 03:05 PM
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Fruit flies are just not that fast.
Yes they are!

I say this as a person who is on the tail end of a major infestation.

They may fly sluggish and lazy, but when I try to swat them, they have an emergency turbo mode that gets them out of harm's way.

My approach:

1) Immediate problems are dealt with by spraying them with a light fog of Windex while on the wing: they fall stunned to my desk and I can swat them.
2) My wife put dishes of apple cider vinegar out, with cling wrap covering the top. She poked lots of small holes in the cling wrap with a toothpick. The fruit flies go in for a drink and never leave.
3) Fly strips near the aforementioned apple cider vinegar dishes.
4) When I see a large enough gathering by one of the plates that is not going in, I use my Shop Vac to suck them all up.
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Old 01-27-2020, 03:14 PM
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Yes, vinegar is a wonderful cleaner/disinfectant and will dissolve calcium and other hard-water deposits.
Vinegar is also the best, most long-lasting way to kill mold and mildew. Bleach will kill mold/mildew on surfaces, but does not penetrate into grout, drywall, etc.
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Old 01-27-2020, 03:14 PM
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They may fly sluggish and lazy, but when I try to swat them, they have an emergency turbo mode that gets them out of harm's way.

1) Immediate problems are dealt with by spraying them with a light fog of Windex while on the wing: they fall stunned to my desk and I can swat them.
This also works for regular flies and other flying insects. But houseflies are so fast you need to spray the area where they will be, not where they are now. If you see a fly sitting on the counter, spray above it so it will fly up into the fog of Windex. If you spray directly at the fly, it can often pop away before the Windex gets to that spot.
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Old 01-27-2020, 04:47 PM
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Yes they are!


2) My wife put dishes of apple cider vinegar out, with cling wrap covering the top. She poked lots of small holes in the cling wrap with a toothpick. The fruit flies go in for a drink and never leave.
Works just as well if you put a few drops of dish washing liquid into the vinegar. It traps the flies. I do this every summer when we have a lot of fruit in the house.
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Old 01-27-2020, 06:58 PM
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Alternatively, save your saran wrap and your dish soap. Get a bottle of wine.

Drink most of the wine.

Leave a little of the wine in the bottom of the bottle, and leave the bottle open in the fruit-fly-infested area.

They can find their way into the bottle just fine. They don't seem to be able to find their way out. Or else they're too drunk to try.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:02 PM
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I use acetone for removing grease spots on my T shirts left by food. Alcohol will also work I believe.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:34 PM
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If you need to swat a flying insect, wet your hand and get it a tiny bit soapy. It won't bounce off your hand and will be drawn like iron to a magnet.

Have a king-sized duvet? Do you dread putting the blanket in it? The burrito method will save you.

Cutting the ends off of onions, celery, and such for cooking? Rinse the ends and peels well and keep them in a bag int he freezer. When you are making broth toss all the ends into the pot and simmer on low overnight. Strain and you'll be left with delicious vegetable broth. You'll save yourself a ton of chopping and make incredibly good soup.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:43 PM
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If you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like prunes than rhubarb does.

Or seriously: Rinse your drinking glasses when done with them, before putting them into the dishwasher; prevents odors (especially milk glasses).

OR: write down your wi-fi password and put it someplace visible. Eventually you'll buy a new device or have to reset a router, and struggle to remember the password. If it's inside your house, there's no privacy concern (unless your snoopy neighbor has a good telescope).
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Old 01-27-2020, 09:04 PM
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Never buy paper products.

A wide variety of launderable towels are available, that last for years. Wipe up spills, or for table napkins, facia wipes, wet hands.

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Get a bidet, or figure out how to do it sitting on the side of the tub.
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Old 01-27-2020, 09:57 PM
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- if you heat a bowl of water and vinegar in the microwave, it makes it easier to clean it out afterwards.
You don't even need the vinegar unless you're trying to get rid of odors at the same time ( in which case adding lemon juice to the water works much more pleasantly). Just boil water for about 5 minutes, then let it sit for another 20 minutes before you open the microwave door, and everything will wipe clean.
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Old 01-27-2020, 11:03 PM
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Before you put the new trash bag in the trash can. Put something in the bag FIRST and THEN put it in the can to avoid the air bubble.

Keep a dust pan handy near the kitchen counters. Next time you wipe down the counters, use the dust pan to catch excess debris instead of your hands.
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Old 01-28-2020, 02:47 AM
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If you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like prunes than rhubarb does.
I see you are a man who appreciates the classics.
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Old 01-28-2020, 06:12 AM
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Clean as you go. Much much easier to keep something clean than to let it go and try to play catch-up. I'd say this also applies to vehicles as well.
When cooking, I like to use the mise en place technique (getting your ingredients all ready ahead of time; measured, chopped, minced, etc). Then, while you're cooking you have time to clean as you go.

When I finish cooking a meal, the kitchen is clean. When my gf finishes cooking a meal, the kitchen looks like a crime scene.
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Old 01-28-2020, 06:19 AM
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● Whenever you're taking something apart, every time you remove something, use your cell phone to take a picture. Then you have a step-by-step visual guide to everything you did, and if you forget how to put it back together, just look at the pictures in reverse order. This saved my ass countless times as a locksmith; people put locks on all kinds of stuff and I would routinely have to break down and reassemble devices I'd never seen before.

● Store a roll of trash bags in the bottom of the bin. You'll never have to look for a trash bag again! (until you run out, at least )

● Dad's rule: "Don't leave the house until something comes out." Really just "go before you go" but I like his wording better.

Last edited by DCnDC; 01-28-2020 at 06:20 AM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 06:19 AM
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When throwing out a tin can for recycling, insert a used soda can, rather than throwing it out separately. It saves space.

When cooking something with lots of ingredients, line up the ingredients on the counter ahead of time, in the order in which they'll be used.
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Old 01-28-2020, 06:44 AM
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There are always things upstairs that need to go down, and things downstairs that need to go up. I try to never go up or down the stairs empty handed.
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Old 01-28-2020, 07:25 AM
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When you buy all-natural peanut butter, there's almost always some peanut oil floating on top that's separated from the more solid stuff below.

Nobody says you have to stir all of the oil back in. You can pour off some or even all of it, and mix up what's left. You can decide what consistency of peanut butter you prefer.

Not to mention, if you pour some of it off before mixing, you're less likely to slosh peanut oil on the counter.
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Old 01-28-2020, 07:39 AM
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When cooking, I like to use the mise en place technique (getting your ingredients all ready ahead of time; measured, chopped, minced, etc). Then, while you're cooking you have time to clean as you go.
My wife has taught me to do this. In addition, store the prepped veggies in the dish/container you're going to use to serve the food. That way you have one fewer container to wash. If you have multiple vegetables used at different times, layer them in reverse order, separated with saran wrap or wax paper.

Also... Slow cooker liners are worth the cost, because slow cooker inner pots are heavy and difficult to wash.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:26 AM
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Parchment paper, either in a roll or in sheets (which I prefer) saves you a multiple of cleanup messes. It's primarily for baking sheets to prevent cookies and the like from sticking to the pan, and is reusable until it gets brittle.

A bench scraper is one of the best kitchen tools you can buy for under $10. It can be used as a chopper as well. Scrape food up and dump in a pan. Scrape food scraps off your cutting surface to chuck in the garbage. Scrape scraps off your counter for disposal. Scrape up that piece of dough you just rolled out that is sticking to the surface. It's usually the first tool I take out of the drawer. I prefer the ones without the side wings.

Last edited by Chefguy; 01-28-2020 at 09:27 AM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:21 AM
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OR: write down your wi-fi password and put it someplace visible. Eventually you'll buy a new device or have to reset a router, and struggle to remember the password. If it's inside your house, there's no privacy concern (unless your snoopy neighbor has a good telescope).
I write my wifi and router login on a self-stick mailing label and stick it to the bottom of the router.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
When cooking, I like to use the mise en place technique (getting your ingredients all ready ahead of time; measured, chopped, minced, etc). Then, while you're cooking you have time to clean as you go. When I finish cooking a meal, the kitchen is clean.
Same here. Prep everything, then as you cook tidy / wash / put stuff away or in the trash. I might have one pan to clean at the end, and measuring cups, chopping boards etc clean on the dish rack.

Last edited by squeegee; 01-28-2020 at 10:25 AM.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:51 AM
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Old 01-28-2020, 12:19 PM
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Don't buy that round disc sold as a jar opener. May sure you always have rubber gloves and use them instead. It's easier, because you don't have to make sure the rubber thingy is in the right place. Just put the gloves on, and they are automatically right where you need them, and you have traction for both hands, not just one. I still put them on to use the slightly higher tech jar opener that I have, because it still gives me traction on the hand holding the jar.
  #33  
Old 01-28-2020, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
When you buy all-natural peanut butter, there's almost always some peanut oil floating on top that's separated from the more solid stuff below.

Nobody says you have to stir all of the oil back in. You can pour off some or even all of it, and mix up what's left. You can decide what consistency of peanut butter you prefer.

Not to mention, if you pour some of it off before mixing, you're less likely to slosh peanut oil on the counter.
I have eaten natural peanut butter for years, and used to use a butter knife to stir the butter and oil together when opening a new jar. It was always messy and time-consuming and there was always some butter that did not get enough oil at the bottom, and was sort of dry. Now I use a basic mixer with only one "arm": just grab the jar tightly and mix slowly on low speed for a few minutes. The job is much easier, cleaner, and the mix is consistent.

A 5-gallon bucket can be used to wash bags, backpacks, jackets and other items too big for your sink or you do not want to put thru the washer. Remove any stiffeners. I usually save up a number of items and do a bunch at one time, then hang out in the sun to dry. I have rehabilitated a number of my kids' backpacks this way and they now serve a 2nd life.

The same 5-gallon bucket was used to trap/release a mouse from inside our house a few years ago.
  #34  
Old 01-28-2020, 08:06 PM
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When I want to have a fresh bagel every day, I skip the grocery store bagels and Dunkin' Donuts bagels and go straight to a proper bagel shop.

I buy a half dozen, slice them, put them back in their paper bag, put that in a ziplock bag, and freeze them. Now, when I want a bagel, I grab a frozen bagel, bang on it to get the halves apart, and pop it in the toaster oven.

Of course, they always taste best when the come fresh from the bagel shop, but an immediately frozen bagel retains almost all of that awesomeness and stands head and shoulders above the stuff from the super market.
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Old 01-28-2020, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
When you buy all-natural peanut butter, there's almost always some peanut oil floating on top that's separated from the more solid stuff below.
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowthx View Post
I have eaten natural peanut butter for years, and used to use a butter knife to stir the butter and oil together when opening a new jar. It was always messy and time-consuming and there was always some butter that did not get enough oil at the bottom, and was sort of dry. .
Store the jar upside down.

Works best if you remember to turn it right side up again some time before you actually want to use it.
  #36  
Old 01-28-2020, 10:21 PM
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The proper way to deal with natural peanut butter is to pour the oil into a cup, get the peanut butter out, and then pour the oil back into the jar.

The oil acts as a sealant to keep everything fresh.

Do the same thing with roux in a jar.
  #37  
Old 01-29-2020, 04:44 AM
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Originally Posted by minor7flat5 View Post
Yes they are!

I say this as a person who is on the tail end of a major infestation.

They may fly sluggish and lazy, but when I try to swat them, they have an emergency turbo mode that gets them out of harm's way.

My approach:

1) Immediate problems are dealt with by spraying them with a light fog of Windex while on the wing: they fall stunned to my desk and I can swat them.
2) My wife put dishes of apple cider vinegar out, with cling wrap covering the top. She poked lots of small holes in the cling wrap with a toothpick. The fruit flies go in for a drink and never leave.
3) Fly strips near the aforementioned apple cider vinegar dishes.
4) When I see a large enough gathering by one of the plates that is not going in, I use my Shop Vac to suck them all up.
Amazing info! Thank you ever so much. Thanks to everyone who have posted tips so far. I have learned many great techniques here that I intend to use. But using Windex to immediately kill flying insects is one of the best. I always worried about using Raid because they fly away only to die somewhere else and that worries me that a whole new infestation of smaller insects will invade to feed on the dead insects. Yuck!

I am sticking some wholes into some cling wrap right now btw.

Last edited by Charlie Wayne; 01-29-2020 at 04:46 AM.
  #38  
Old 01-29-2020, 04:56 AM
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Put a piece of saran wrap over your opened ice cream to prevent getting ice crystals on it.
What are these ice crystals you speak of?


mmm
  #39  
Old 01-29-2020, 05:44 AM
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I have eaten natural peanut butter for years, and used to use a butter knife to stir the butter and oil together when opening a new jar. It was always messy and time-consuming and there was always some butter that did not get enough oil at the bottom, and was sort of dry.
For those that continue to do this by hand, (a) pouring some of the oil off makes the mixing process quicker, easier, and less messy, and (b) if the PB gets too dry and hard, just nuke the jar for 15-30 seconds, depending on how much is still in the jar.
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Store the jar upside down.

Works best if you remember to turn it right side up again some time before you actually want to use it.
Absolutely do this if you want to mix all the oil in. I don't do this because I like a thicker consistency of PB which I get by pouring a lot of the oil off the top. (I can put a really thick layer of PB on my PB&J since it's not runny!)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grrr! View Post
The proper way to deal with natural peanut butter is to pour the oil into a cup, get the peanut butter out, and then pour the oil back into the jar.
If I understand you correctly, doesn't that mean you have an oily cup to clean up after each time you use any PB? (Also, what's left in the jar might be kinda hard, though as I said above, that can be alleviated by nuking.)
Quote:
The oil acts as a sealant to keep everything fresh.
Never worried much about that - it's rare for an opened jar of PB to last a week around here.
  #40  
Old 01-29-2020, 06:00 AM
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Don't buy that round disc sold as a jar opener. May sure you always have rubber gloves and use them instead. It's easier, because you don't have to make sure the rubber thingy is in the right place. Just put the gloves on, and they are automatically right where you need them, and you have traction for both hands, not just one. I still put them on to use the slightly higher tech jar opener that I have, because it still gives me traction on the hand holding the jar.
To each his/her own on this one - the disc works just fine for us, and a pair of rubber gloves would be one more thing we'd have to keep handy in the rather small work area of our kitchen.

But talking about jar openers reminds me of what I regard as a vastly superior can opener.

Your standard can opener cuts a hole in the lid of the can just inside the rim. This can opener lifts the entire lid off the can. So (a) the removed lid has no sharp edges, and (b) if you only use part of what's in the can, you can actually pop the lid back on the can.

We've been using this kind of can opener for ten or twelve years now, and we wouldn't dream of going back to the old kind.
  #41  
Old 01-29-2020, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
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If you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like prunes than rhubarb does.
. . .
Quote:
Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
I see you are a man who appreciates the classics.
Great Og almighty! The board has been invaded by Marxists!

If you are pinching pennies, making your own laundry soap, hand soap, and hand lotion is insanely cheap. I used to make six month's worth of laundry soap for about $7. It's easy to lose track of what these items do to your grocery bill. You tube has a hundred recipes and methods. (If the recipe starts with Naptha or Zote, boil the water first, before adding them.)
  #42  
Old 01-29-2020, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
it's rare for an opened jar of PB to last a week around here.
I buy our peanut butter freshly ground at our friend's farm market. It's sold in a small plastic container, like you'd get coleslaw in, and has honey mixed into it. When I buy a container we share it three ways; I get a couple of sandwhiches, my gf has a sandwhich and blends some into her smoothies, and Rocco (our parrot) gets a few PB crackers.
  #43  
Old 01-29-2020, 07:25 AM
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Great Og almighty! The board has been invaded by Marxists!
We infiltrated back at the beginning! We used to have a full complement - me, Exapno Mapcase (Harpo), Why A Duck (Chico), and Zappo (Zeppo), but the latter two haven't posted in about 15 years. So now I've got just one 'brother' on the board.
  #44  
Old 01-29-2020, 08:35 AM
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A little late for folks to act on, but when putting away Christmas lights, I wrap each string around a piece of cardboard, rather than dropping them into a box to get tangled.

For swatting flies, particularly good sized flies, I like the clap method. Place your hands about six inches apart, slightly above the fly, then clap them together. The fly will instinctively jump up to avoid getting hit, and fly right between your hands for a quick death.
  #45  
Old 01-29-2020, 09:53 AM
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Your standard can opener cuts a hole in the lid of the can just inside the rim. This can opener lifts the entire lid off the can. So (a) the removed lid has no sharp edges, and (b) if you only use part of what's in the can, you can actually pop the lid back on the can.
I'm not sure what the standard is in the US, but everywhere I've lived in Europe you can get canned products with a tab that you pull with your finger to open the can. The same result as the fancy can opener, but you save 10 seconds of your life per can, because the opener is already built in.

My tip here would be to buy the cans with tabs, disregard all other brands.

That reminds me of something that can save you even more time: only buying clothes that are easy to care for, with synthetic additions that make them flexible and less likely to crease. If you see something at the shop and it already has creases just from being handled, do not buy this thing.

Another tip for clothes is to not get them all the way dry in the dryer. Take them out semi-wet but not dripping and hang up to dry. They straighten themselves out under their own weight.

I haven't used an iron in years except for especially formal occasions.
  #46  
Old 01-29-2020, 10:01 AM
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Speaking of jar openers, this type is by far the most effective. Maybe overkill unless you have arthritis.

Last edited by scr4; 01-29-2020 at 10:02 AM.
  #47  
Old 01-29-2020, 02:45 PM
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Buy yourself one or two big, sturdy trays. Like this.

Keep them with your housekeeping equipment. When it's time to dust and polish the tops or shelves of tchotchke-laden furniture, it's easy to move all the stuff off the furniture and onto the tray. This is better than picking up each ornament one at a time to dust under it. When the furniture is all dusted, it's easy to clean each ornament quickly and replace it.

I also use this method when cleaning out the interior of the refrigerator or the sink vanity tops in the bathroom. It goes much faster.

Last edited by teela brown; 01-29-2020 at 02:47 PM.
  #48  
Old 01-29-2020, 03:55 PM
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Yes they are!

I say this as a person who is on the tail end of a major infestation.

......

2) My wife put dishes of apple cider vinegar out, with cling wrap covering the top. She poked lots of small holes in the cling wrap with a toothpick. The fruit flies go in for a drink and never leave.
Thank you very much for this tip. It worked really well for me. I caught two of them within one hour. I had thought that pouring boiling water down the sink drains had solved the problem because I haven't seen any for a few days.

But they must still be around because they went for that vinegar and water combo with relish.

Yikes! I just realized you said "apple cider vinegar" and I used ordinary vinegar. I will try apple cider and let you know the difference.

Thanks again.

Last edited by Charlie Wayne; 01-29-2020 at 03:56 PM.
  #49  
Old 01-29-2020, 03:57 PM
RTFirefly is offline
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Originally Posted by Esturionette View Post
I'm not sure what the standard is in the US, but everywhere I've lived in Europe you can get canned products with a tab that you pull with your finger to open the can. The same result as the fancy can opener, but you save 10 seconds of your life per can, because the opener is already built in.

My tip here would be to buy the cans with tabs, disregard all other brands.
Unfortunately, in the U.S., the only cans that have those tabs are cans of snack foods or other ready-to-eat foods. But canned food that you're going to bring home, put in the pantry, and open when you're cooking something - no tabs.
Cans of chicken broth, tomato sauce, kidney beans, evaporated milk - nope, no tabs.
Not in any brand.

Been awhile since I've been across the pond, and as tourists staying in hotels, we didn't give much thought to grocery stores. But whenever I'm next in Europe, I'll have to check this out.
Quote:
I haven't used an iron in years except for especially formal occasions.
It's not something I discuss much with other people, but I get the impression that few Americans use an iron on clothes more than once in a blue moon. We've got an iron and an ironing board, but if we use them twice in one year, that's a busy year for ironing in our house.
  #50  
Old 01-29-2020, 07:28 PM
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My tip for natural peanut butter: go to Whole Foods (literally the only thing I buy there.) You can grind your own, with usually a few different options to choose from. The packages are square and wide, instead of just tall and deep, so you don't get the same depth of oil and it's a lot easier to reincorporate it back into the pb. And you could always not fill it to the top. Plus it's the best pb I've ever had. I don't like crunchy very much but smooth is kind of boring. This has a pleasantly rough texture to it that is a great in-between for crunch and smooth. For Whole Foods, it's not very pricey.

I haven't done this one myself, but I read if you have facial eczema, use t-shirts instead of pillowcases and layer them. Each day when you get up, remove the outermost and you have a new one for that night already waiting. Having a new one every day is supposed to help with flare ups and using old t-shirts is a lot cheaper than buying 7 new cases per pillow.
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