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Old 09-12-2019, 11:08 PM
SummerIceWinter2 is offline
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Too afraid to speak up and now I may mess up


I've been working at Wendy's for a year now and yesterday my manager said that from Friday and on I will now be working in Drive Thru as a Cashier. I have never been a cashier ever in my life! I have always worked around food and cleaned up the restaurant at night after closing. One of my Co Workers asked my manager why can't she just hired someone new who knows what they are doing because my co worker said that she doesn't have the patience to train me. My manager yelled "You will teach her and she will do it!" Now I am afraid because I am not that good at doing mental math in my head and I'm scared I may hold up the Drive Thru trying to figure it out or I may mess up giving someone their correct amount of change. What do I do? Should I just go to my manager tomorrow and tell her that I have no idea what I'm doing?
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:28 PM
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The register will do the math for you, hon.
I think fast food registers have the food in pictures on them. You can do this. The window will be fast, but the food choices will be ones you've seen before.
I believe in you. Go in with an open mind and don't let your coworker sabotage you. If she short changes you on training tell your Boss. Good luck.
Btw, nice to meet you.
Welcome to the Dope.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 09-12-2019 at 11:30 PM.
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:30 PM
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Since the OP is looking for advice, let's move this to IMHO.

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Old 09-12-2019, 11:34 PM
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Based on information you gave I say you have come to just the right conclusion on what to do, "..go to your manager tomorrow and tell her that you have no idea what you're doing".

However I wouldn't recommend you use that wording. Better I think if you said, "I'm not comfortable working the drive up and would prefer to do a different job" (Or use some other similar wording that is right for you)

Part II is that you will need to stick to your guns and despite whatever your manager says keep saying you would prefer not to work the drive through. The manager likely will try to talk you into doing it and you have to be strong on this point.

That your manager "yelled" at an employee worries me a lot and part III is I believe you would do well to find work at another place.

I wish you good luck and hope you find a happy outcome.
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:39 PM
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I can only respond as a drive-thru customer.
First, an operation which seems to take an eternity to you (since you are doing it over and over) won't seem like any time at all for the customer.
Can you listen to the orders, check that they are correct, and speak clearly to the customer? If you can, you'll be better than 90% of the people I've dealt with.
You can do this.
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:42 PM
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If you do end up working drive-thru, try to sound like you enjoy being there. One guy who works DT at my local Wendy's makes Ben Stein sound like Ned Flanders. Put a smile in your voice, dig?
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Old 09-13-2019, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Rilchiam View Post
If you do end up working drive-thru, try to sound like you enjoy being there. One guy who works DT at my local Wendy's makes Ben Stein sound like Ned Flanders. Put a smile in your voice, dig?
And be careful what you say. there was one local drive through where a couple of times the guy made a mistake and said "Oh crap!" Came through loud and clear to my car.

Agree with what Beck said - the Register normally makes it easy. Just keep calm and carry on.

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Old 09-13-2019, 07:38 AM
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Don't worry! Just be friendly with the customers and people generally don't get too upset if you mess up. Plus, you probably won't make as many mistakes as you think. And like another poster said, the register will do all of the hard math.

But I would be honest with your manager and say that you're willing to try it but since you've never done it for long there may be a learning curve.
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Old 09-13-2019, 07:51 AM
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Don't worry too much about it, just give it a shot. You might make a few mistakes, but that's a great way to learn how to do something right.
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Old 09-13-2019, 08:03 AM
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That your manager "yelled" at an employee worries me a lot and part III is I believe you would do well to find work at another place.
I'm glad the manager yelled. Co-worker sounds like an ass.


SummerIceWinter2, as Beck said, you won't have to do any math. You'll probably be a pro at the register before you know it! I hope you like it.
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:30 AM
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I'll echo that the register will do all the math for you.

Can you count? Can you figure out that if you need to give 37 cents to someone then it's one quarter, one dime and two pennies? Congratulations - that's the most complicated math you will need.

One piece of advice from someone who ran a register back in the dark ages. Put the cash they give you on the outside of the register, give them their change, then put the cash they gave you in the register. 99.9% of the people will take the change and leave. 0.1% of the time, someone will say that they gave you a $20 instead of a $10. Then you still have the cash they gave you out, and confirm that they did give you a $10 and you gave them the right change (or that you made a mistake and need to give them more money back). (Also, I might be one of those people because I'm a ditz, and not because I'm scamming you!)
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:34 AM
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Give it a try. I was nervous my first time running drive thru, but after a few days, I became pretty proficient.
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:35 AM
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I believe you'll find it easier than cooking and cleaning. I resisted doing the register at the concession stand I volunteered at. When I 'had' to do it, I was expert by the end of the ballgame.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 09-13-2019 at 11:36 AM.
  #14  
Old 09-13-2019, 11:39 AM
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I got fired from the drive through because when we would get busy, I would become so flustered that I would give the customers their food and forget to take their money. Lol.

But anyway, another vote for: You can do this OP!
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:46 AM
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One more thing I'd like to add:

When I was a cashier (at many places) I actually got WORSE at math. Before I cashiered I was quite good at doing numbers in my head. But then having the register do all the math for me, I just got lazy and lost my ability to do the math as quickly as I use to.
  #16  
Old 09-13-2019, 12:42 PM
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The register makes the math easy. You're manager believes you're the best person for the job and she knows you better than we do. If you're good with people, you can do this job easily. Good luck!
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Old 09-13-2019, 01:19 PM
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It'll come to you. The register does the math (and, unlike Grrr, I actually found working as a cashier improved my mental math and change making skills a lot and quickly, despite the register). The only tricky part may be counting out the coins efficiently, but that you should be able to figure out within a couple of shifts. (I seem to recall my first shift on the register getting something that was like 43 cents in change and kind of freezing up and going for four dimes and three pennies, because I didn't want to think about it. But within one or two transactions like that, I realized, oh, duh, quarter, dime, nickel is forty cents, and then grab three more pennies, pulykamell, you moron! It's just that I never really had to think about it before, but now that I had to do it every transaction, it quickly became second nature to grab the right coins in the most efficient manner.)

And, these days, a lot of times the machines just figure that out for you, as well, so you don't have to do anything.

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-13-2019 at 01:20 PM.
  #18  
Old 09-14-2019, 09:55 AM
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Your boss chose you because he has confidence in you. It is always stressful to take on a job with new or added responsibility, but you need to push through it. Eventually you might be the store manager, but only if you take opportunities when they come.
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Old 09-14-2019, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SummerIceWinter2 View Post
I have never been a cashier ever in my life!
This was true at some point about everyone who has ever been a cashier. There's a first time for everything.
  #20  
Old 09-14-2019, 11:21 AM
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Most people will pay with a card, so a swipe and they are on their way. When someone paid with cash and the price ended in a 1 or a 6, I always asked if they had a penny to avoid having to give them four pennies in change.

Remember...just because you don't know how to do something doesn't mean you can't learn it. Get trained and the more you do it the better you'll get.

You can always thank customers for their patience (don't apologize, instead express gratitude) on your first couple of days because you're new.

I bet after a week you'll be able to do it in your sleep.
  #21  
Old 09-14-2019, 04:35 PM
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Strange to put you on drive-thru before they put you on the front register. Can you ask to try that first?
  #22  
Old 09-15-2019, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Stinky Pete View Post
Based on information you gave I say you have come to just the right conclusion on what to do, "..go to your manager tomorrow and tell her that you have no idea what you're doing".

However I wouldn't recommend you use that wording. Better I think if you said, "I'm not comfortable working the drive up and would prefer to do a different job" (Or use some other similar wording that is right for you)

Part II is that you will need to stick to your guns and despite whatever your manager says keep saying you would prefer not to work the drive through. The manager likely will try to talk you into doing it and you have to be strong on this point.
I'm not sure what 'guns' they have to stick to. They pay you to work there, and so you have to work wherever they tell you. You can (and should) tell your manager 'I'm not sure I've been trained enough for this position; I'm afraid I'll make mistakes doing it." The manager will likely tell another employee to give you some more training, and/or reassure you that everybody makes mistakes at first and you'll do fine. But you do have to work there if the manager says so.

It's pretty common for managers to want to have employees cross-trained to be able to handle different positions in the store, because that makes it easy to fill in as needed. And it makes you a more valuable employee at the store.
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Old 09-15-2019, 12:58 AM
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Strange to put you on drive-thru before they put you on the front register. Can you ask to try that first?
Ditto. Back when I worked at McDonald's years ago, I worked at a normal front register for a few months before working the drive-thru.

Everything seems to go faster in drive-thru, and taking the orders from a disembodied speaker or headset is another complication.

Nevertheless, like anything else, you get more proficient the more you do it.

And I second the idea of getting proficient at as many crew positions in the restaurant as you can. Before I stopped working at McD's, I could handle just about any position, including front counter, drive-thru, fry cook, and grill master. It also made the days more interesting, because you weren't necessarily doing the same position and the same task every shift.
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Old 09-16-2019, 09:13 AM
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try to sound like you enjoy being there. Put a smile in your voice, dig?
Yes, smile DELIRIOUSLY. Don't ruin someone's hamburger experience by speaking in a monotone.
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Old 09-16-2019, 09:21 AM
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Just curious if the OP really has a problem with the cash register or something else. Maybe she isn't comfortable dealing with the customers face to face, or just has a general anxiety problem. Even the cash register problem may be because she's not numerically literate at all and needs a little help there.

Anyway, the OP only has that one post, if this is real I hope she can get through it, life has a lot of hills like this to climb, but they get easier as you get practice climbing them.
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Old 09-16-2019, 09:47 AM
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I used to have a lot of anxiety about speaking on the phone. When I got a job that would involve using the phone a lot, I was terrified. I probably even cried.

Now, I'm a totally normal person who uses the phone all the time and it's no big deal. I'm cured!

Well, you know, a fairly normal person. Sufficiently normal.
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Old 09-16-2019, 10:47 AM
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I did the drive-thru at Wendy's back in the 90's. The register did _not_ do the math. But that was a single window store so when I took an order I would read the total to the customer and then hang the ticket for the person assembling the order. Then I'd be taking cash for whichever car was at the window which could be the order I just had taken or it could be from 3 orders before. I had to learn how to count up (well, I already knew how to do that from previous jobs). I always set the cash across the tilled money and under the metal tab because it gets very windy at the window (worse in the winter because there was also a heat blower to help keep you from freezing). As soon as I gave them their change and they pulled away I would right side the cash.

Besides taking orders and handing the food out I had to pull drinks (sometimes an ass. manager would slide in to help with that) and frosties. During non-rush hours I'd be making sandwiches, getting fries, cooking the burgers etc. plus bagging the orders.

My drawer was usually either spot on or a few cents off. Except near the time when I quit and my drawer kept coming up off by $4 or $7. I quit one day when the ass. managers were in the back laughing and yakking and we got slammed. Both in the front and the drive-thru. There were only 3 of us on the line so we called back for help but none came. After the slam was over they came up front and wanted me to run the mop through the store. That was the last straw for me. I took off my apron, my visor and my nametag and said "I quit." They lost an Opener and a Closer (I worked split shifts 4 days a week and 2 days a straight 8 hour shift). I walked across the street and filled out an application at the restaurant I had worked at in high school. Not as many hours but way less stressful.

A month later my friend (an ass. manager at Wendy's) stopped over where I was now working and told me that the other ass. manager was fired for stealing cash.
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Old 09-16-2019, 11:24 AM
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I did the drive-thru at Wendy's back in the 90's. The register did _not_ do the math.
FWIW, the registers at the McDonald's where I worked in the '80s did do the math. You pressed the button for each item and then hit the "Total" button to generate the total. You then punched in the amount the customer gave you, and it calculated the change.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistymage View Post
...My drawer was usually either spot on or a few cents off. Except near the time when I quit and my drawer kept coming up off by $4 or $7.

...A month later my friend (an ass. manager at Wendy's) stopped over where I was now working and told me that the other ass. manager was fired for stealing cash.
After my first shift on the front register at McDonald's, I was told that my register was exactly $20 short. I was counseled for this, and informed patronizingly by the shift manager of the fact that all drawers were counted after each shift. Of course I was well aware of this, and I was incensed at the accusation that I had pocketed the missing money, but I was also fairly certain that I hadn't made any mistakes. I was counseled to "be more careful" and it never happened again.

I later heard that this sort of thing happened every time a new person started, but only when this particular manager counted the drawers. They finally figured out the manager was stealing money from the drawers of new employees, and then counseling them about it. They put a stop to it by firing the manager.
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Old 09-16-2019, 12:45 PM
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A month later my friend (an ass. manager at Wendy's) stopped over where I was now working and told me that the other ass. manager was fired for stealing cash.
What an ass!
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Old 09-16-2019, 03:22 PM
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FWIW, the registers at the McDonald's where I worked in the '80s did do the math. You pressed the button for each item and then hit the "Total" button to generate the total. You then punched in the amount the customer gave you, and it calculated the change.
Registers that do this have been available for a long time, but they used to be much more expensive than the basic cash register. So stores that needed fast service and/or had lots of young, untrained workers (fast food places had both) paid the extra money for the calculating registers. But your local hardware store, etc. didn't spend the money for that. (Now, I think every register is computerized, and computes change & more. I don't know if you could still buy one that doesn't.)

Back about then, the owner of a pair of fast food places (Burger King, I think) came into our bank to borrow the money to buy all new calculating registers. (They were that expensive; he needed a loan for this.) He had calculated that what he was losing in slower service + losses from giving incorrect change* were large enough that these new registers would pay for themselves within a year or two.

* He said that when a cashier short-changes a customer, they nearly all notice and object (or complain next time); but when a cashier gives them too much change, only about half of the customers will say anything.
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