Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-28-2019, 08:39 AM
SanVito is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 4,867

So talk me through Thanksgiving rolls


I love cooking, and I love a roast dinner, especially Christmas dinner, which in the UK is very similar, in some respects, to what you guys have for Thanksgiving.

And on this day, I'm jealous, because you're all having a long boozy lunch, and I'm at work.

But there are some distinct differences in our feasting habits, and I've never seen or eaten a proper American Thanksgiving dinner in the flesh, so some things leave me puzzled.

• I worked out that stuffing and dressing are both what we'd just call stuffing.
• I've noted that green bean casserole comes with a dousing with Campbells soup which sounds a little 1970s but hey, tradition.
• I've digested the idea of the astonishing sweet potato casserole with marshmallows - a dish invented by toddlers, for certain. I don't have any plans to try it any time soon.

But talk me through the rolls-thing. Are these just normal bread rolls? Or something different/sweeter? Do you just have them on the side during your main course, or at some other point in the meal? And if the former, aren't they just a bit filling considering you've already got an enormous plate of meat, potatoes, cranberry and veg? (and marshmallows, lest we forget).

Help a girl out here.

Last edited by SanVito; 11-28-2019 at 08:40 AM.
  #2  
Old 11-28-2019, 08:57 AM
shh1313 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 37
Just grab one and slather some butter on it, then enjoy it!
  #3  
Old 11-28-2019, 09:13 AM
ThelmaLou's Avatar
ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 16,881
I thought you were asking about the rolls that appear around the waistline after a season of indulging in treats.

The rolls-- of any kind-- are for sopping up gravy. Also for making on-the-spot sandwiches (sarnies to the likes of you ) at the table with a little turkey, gravy, cranberry sauce. This is for when your arms are too tired to use knife and fork.

I'm taking sweet potatoes to a friend's house today-- no marshmallows, but a heavy dash of orange juice and a topping of toasted pecans with brown sugar.

Also you left out cranberry sauce, which I love, and which I eat all year round with everything.
__________________
“Master, I’ve discovered the answer! Knock and the door will be opened to you.” The master replied, “Who said the door was closed?”

Last edited by ThelmaLou; 11-28-2019 at 09:13 AM.
  #4  
Old 11-28-2019, 10:24 AM
SanVito is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 4,867
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I thought you were asking about the rolls that appear around the waistline after a season of indulging in treats.

The rolls-- of any kind-- are for sopping up gravy. Also for making on-the-spot sandwiches (sarnies to the likes of you ) at the table with a little turkey, gravy, cranberry sauce. This is for when your arms are too tired to use knife and fork.
Right, so they really ARE just bread rolls. You guys are insatiable - there's no room for bread after my Christmas dinner. Although turkey sarnies are a staple for tea, generally accompanied by the Doctor Who Christmas Special and a random relative trying to get us all to play charades.

I must confess, mopping up your dinner plate with bread rolls or making a sandwich at the table, when you're supposed to be having a nice dinner with table cloths and wine does seem a little - gauche? But that's because my mother taught me table manners, and she's like an extra from Downton Abbey.

[QUOTE=ThelmaLou;21998629]I'm taking sweet potatoes to a friend's house today-- no marshmallows, but a heavy dash of orange juice and a topping of toasted pecans with brown sugar.

Okay, that sounds more palatable, I would give that a nibble.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Also you left out cranberry sauce, which I love, and which I eat all year round with everything.
Oh, we have that too. I also eat it year round with roast chicken, although I'm not sure that's typical behaviour. We're supposed to have bread sauce, but I just can't get on with it.

Last edited by SanVito; 11-28-2019 at 10:25 AM.
  #5  
Old 11-28-2019, 10:36 AM
burpo the wonder mutt's Avatar
burpo the wonder mutt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Slow-cala, Florida
Posts: 24,880
That's why we broke from England in the first place! Taxation? Baff! WE WANTED ROLLS!!
__________________
"Woof! Woof! Woof! Woof! That's my other dog imitation." - Oddball
  #6  
Old 11-28-2019, 11:13 AM
romansperson's Avatar
romansperson is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,820
They can be regular bread rolls, or here in the South, they can be biscuits, which are not like your biscuits but like this.

They are flaky and split apart easily, which means they make great carriers for leftovers - split one in half, slap a slice of ham or turkey on, add whatever other ingredients you want (cranberry sauce, gravy, a slice of cheese, etc.), top with the other half of the biscuit, and that's some mighty fine eating right there.
  #7  
Old 11-28-2019, 11:37 AM
pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 48,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by romansperson View Post
They can be regular bread rolls, or here in the South, they can be biscuits, which are not like your biscuits but like this.
They are similar to some types of unsweetened British scones. (First time I had a proper scone up in Scotland I was surprised by how much like a biscuit they were. I'm a Northerner, though, so it's quite possible a true Southerner would think I'm nuts, but damned if I could tell much of a difference.)
  #8  
Old 11-28-2019, 11:55 AM
SanVito is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 4,867
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
They are similar to some types of unsweetened British scones. (First time I had a proper scone up in Scotland I was surprised by how much like a biscuit they were. I'm a Northerner, though, so it's quite possible a true Southerner would think I'm nuts, but damned if I could tell much of a difference.)
I had biscuits* when I was in Key West and agree, they are a bit like scones. Which makes me worry how I'd eat a great big biscuit sandwich without it falling apart. Knife and fork?

(*Bit sweet for my tastes, like a lot of 'savoury' US food stuff. TBF I thought the same about the bread and butter)

Last edited by SanVito; 11-28-2019 at 11:55 AM.
  #9  
Old 11-28-2019, 12:03 PM
romansperson's Avatar
romansperson is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
They are similar to some types of unsweetened British scones. (First time I had a proper scone up in Scotland I was surprised by how much like a biscuit they were. I'm a Northerner, though, so it's quite possible a true Southerner would think I'm nuts, but damned if I could tell much of a difference.)
One difference would be in the use of butter for scones vs. lard or Crisco for biscuits. Makes for a slightly different flavor and texture.

And proper biscuits are NOT sweet.

Last edited by romansperson; 11-28-2019 at 12:04 PM.
  #10  
Old 11-28-2019, 12:32 PM
Aspenglow's Avatar
Aspenglow is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,353
Here's a traditional dinner roll recipe if you ever care to try them. This recipe makes 30 dinner rolls if you follow it exactly and they are rich! I usually cut the recipe in half, make the rolls a little bigger and do a dozen at a time. Alternatively, you can make the whole recipe and freeze what you don't eat, either the dough or the finished rolls. They freeze beautifully either way.

Dinner Rolls

Ingredients

• 1/4 cup warm water (115 degrees)
• 2 packets (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast
• 1 1/2 cups warm whole milk (115 degrees)
• 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted, plus more for bowl and pans
• 1/4 cup sugar
• 2 1/4 teaspoons salt
• 3 large eggs
• 6 to 6 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for work surface

Directions

1. Place water in a small bowl; sprinkle with yeast, and let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. In a large bowl, whisk together milk, butter, sugar, salt, and 2 eggs. Whisk in yeast mixture.

2. Using a wooden spoon, stir in 6 cups flour, 1 cup at a time, until you have a soft, shaggy dough (if necessary, add up to 1/2 cup more flour). Turn dough out onto a floured work surface; knead until smooth and elastic, 5 to 10 minutes. (If you're lazy like me, use your stand mixer with the dough hook for about 6 minutes.) Butter the inside of a large bowl; place dough in bowl, turning to coat. Cover bowl with plastic wrap; let stand in a warm spot until dough has doubled in size, about 1 1/4 hours.

3. Butter two 13-by-9-inch baking pans. Divide dough in half. Roll each half into a 15-inch rope; cut each rope into 15 1-inch pieces. Press each piece into a disk, then shape into a ball. Arrange dough balls in prepared pans. (To make ahead: Wrap pans well, and freeze, up to 2 months.) Cover pans loosely with plastic; let stand in a warm spot until rolls have doubled in size, about 1 1/4 hours (2 hours more if frozen).

4. Preheat oven to 375 degrees, with racks in upper and lower thirds. In a small bowl, beat remaining egg until blended; brush onto rolls. Bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes, rotating pans back to front and top to bottom halfway through. Let rolls cool 15 minutes before serving.

____

They are a little sweet, which I don't usually like in rolls, but these are the traditional Thanksgiving rolls I had most often at many Thanksgiving dinners through the years in many parts of the country so I always serve them. They are nice.

And yeah, it's a ridiculous carb load to serve bread rolls at a dinner that already features bread stuffing, potatoes, some concoction of corn (in my traditional dinner, corn fritters) and pumpkin pie, among many other things... but that's really the point of Thanksgiving. Way too much!!

Last edited by Aspenglow; 11-28-2019 at 12:32 PM.
  #11  
Old 11-28-2019, 01:15 PM
ThelmaLou's Avatar
ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanVito View Post
Right, so they really ARE just bread rolls. You guys are insatiable - there's no room for bread after my Christmas dinner. Although turkey sarnies are a staple for tea, generally accompanied by the Doctor Who Christmas Special and a random relative trying to get us all to play charades.
Ah, you can always stuff in a few more carbs.

Quote:
I must confess, mopping up your dinner plate with bread rolls or making a sandwich at the table, when you're supposed to be having a nice dinner with table cloths and wine does seem a little - gauche? But that's because my mother taught me table manners, and she's like an extra from Downton Abbey....
Well the whole frickin' country is gauche and lacking couth. It's one of the reasons we're so fascinated with Downton Abbey.

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I'm taking sweet potatoes to a friend's house today-- no marshmallows, but a heavy dash of orange juice and a topping of toasted peall cans with brown sugar.
Okay, that sounds more palatable, I would give that a nibble.
....
I just took them out of the oven. INSANELY good. I sprinkled a few flakes (I mean it: just a few...) of coarse Maldon Sea Salt over the top. Très yummy!
__________________
“Master, I’ve discovered the answer! Knock and the door will be opened to you.” The master replied, “Who said the door was closed?”
  #12  
Old 11-28-2019, 02:02 PM
aceplace57 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 26,505
Rolls have never been a major part of my family's holiday meals.

At most, some brown & serve rolls may be on the table. Purchased at the store. We often serve them at dinner meals. But there's so much food at the holiday meal that rolls get ignored. They go stale overnight. I don't like seeing food wasted and we haven't served rolls on Thanksgiving in years.

Last edited by aceplace57; 11-28-2019 at 02:03 PM.
  #13  
Old 11-28-2019, 03:51 PM
CelticKnot is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: BackHome again in Indiana
Posts: 1,122
Brown and serve, crescent rolls from refrigerator dough, yeast rolls. For sopping up gravy or just because they are delicious.
  #14  
Old 11-28-2019, 10:19 PM
Northern Piper is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: The snow is back, dammit!
Posts: 30,088
I have learnt something.

"Rolls" seems to be used in place of "buns".

I never talk of rolls. Except the occasional lobster roll if i'm in the Maritimes.
  #15  
Old 11-28-2019, 10:28 PM
Ann Hedonia's Avatar
Ann Hedonia is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,552
Quote:
Originally Posted by CelticKnot View Post
Brown and serve, crescent rolls from refrigerator dough, yeast rolls. For sopping up gravy or just because they are delicious.
This year my nephew made fresh-“churned” butter for the rolls right before the meal. Not in a real churn or anything, He just puts cream and a little salt in a jar and shakes it until it’s butter and buttermilk.

Yum. Just Yum.

Last edited by Ann Hedonia; 11-28-2019 at 10:28 PM.
  #16  
Old 11-28-2019, 10:33 PM
romansperson's Avatar
romansperson is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,820
Rolls, baps and buns are all treading more or less the same territory.
  #17  
Old 11-29-2019, 01:11 AM
Die Capacitrix's Avatar
Die Capacitrix is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 180
Martin's potato rolls were always on the table at Thanksgiving.

Ever so often I think of trying to make them by hand. Amish dinner rolls looks like it might work.
  #18  
Old 11-29-2019, 02:20 AM
engineer_comp_geek's Avatar
engineer_comp_geek is offline
Robot Mod in Beta Testing
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 25,542
Moderator Action

Let's roll this over to Cafe Society (from MPSIMS).
  #19  
Old 11-29-2019, 03:15 AM
terentii's Avatar
terentii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 18,456
Sweet potatoes are also delicious with butter and maple syrup (or maple sugar). My daughter (age 24) prefers sweet potatoes to plain potatoes.

One of the best lines in Corner Gas came when Dog River was having a potluck and town idiot Hank volunteered to bring the sweet potato pie:

HANK: [Talking to Karen on the phone] I don't know about this sweet potato pie. The potatoes aren't sweet.
KAREN: Did you buy sweet potatoes?
HANK: It's hard to tell until you get 'em home and taste them.
__________________
"Makes you wonder why we bother, eh, Fawlty?"
"Didn't know you did, Major."
  #20  
Old 11-29-2019, 03:37 AM
terentii's Avatar
terentii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 18,456
Oh, yeah: The difference between stuffing and dressing is that stuffing is actually cooked inside the bird. Dressing may be made out of the same ingredients, but it's usually cooked and served in its own dish.

The last time I cooked a holiday dinner, there was wild rice stuffing and three dressings: oyster, chestnut, and corn bread.
__________________
"Makes you wonder why we bother, eh, Fawlty?"
"Didn't know you did, Major."
  #21  
Old 11-29-2019, 04:07 AM
terentii's Avatar
terentii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 18,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann Hedonia View Post
This year my nephew made fresh-“churned” butter for the rolls right before the meal. Not in a real churn or anything, He just puts cream and a little salt in a jar and shakes it until it’s butter and buttermilk.

Yum. Just Yum.
Jamie Oliver does this in a food processor. Takes about 30 seconds.
__________________
"Makes you wonder why we bother, eh, Fawlty?"
"Didn't know you did, Major."
  #22  
Old 11-29-2019, 08:55 AM
ThelmaLou's Avatar
ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Sweet potatoes are also delicious with butter and maple syrup (or maple sugar). My daughter (age 24) prefers sweet potatoes to plain potatoes.

One of the best lines in Corner Gas came when Dog River was having a potluck and town idiot Hank volunteered to bring the sweet potato pie:

HANK: [Talking to Karen on the phone] I don't know about this sweet potato pie. The potatoes aren't sweet.
KAREN: Did you buy sweet potatoes?
HANK: It's hard to tell until you get 'em home and taste them.
That was a GREAT show! [/aside]
__________________
“Master, I’ve discovered the answer! Knock and the door will be opened to you.” The master replied, “Who said the door was closed?”
  #23  
Old 11-29-2019, 09:22 AM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 85,793
Rolls are a bit idiosyncratic. The dinner I had yesterday at a family friend's house didn't have any sort of bread at all (other than as a component of the stuffing). At my sister's house on Sunday, there won't be rolls, but there will be loaves of fresh-baked bread. Some families will insist on rolls, but store-bought are fine. Some will insist on Gramma's recipe (which will, of course, be different from some other grandma's recipe). Some (especially in the South) will have biscuits instead of rolls (which, properly, should NOT be sweet).

Turkey, stuffing/dressing (in my region, we call it all "stuffing" even if it's cooked separately), mashed potatoes, and gravy are all very nearly ubiquitous. Cranberry sauce, that 1970s green bean casserole, and sweet potatoes with marshmallows are not ubiquitous, but still pretty common. You'll have some sort of vegetable, and probably two or three, though what kind varies considerably. Dessert is usually pie, especially pumpkin pie (which might, depending on the family, actually be sweet potato pie).
  #24  
Old 11-29-2019, 09:22 AM
pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 48,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by romansperson View Post
One difference would be in the use of butter for scones vs. lard or Crisco for biscuits. Makes for a slightly different flavor and texture.
Aren't biscuits made with either? From my research, it's an argument in the biscuit-making community as to which to use. Like here's an example.

I'll have to try making them with shortening/butter next time. The times I've made biscuits, it's always been a butter-based recipe, but I do see my bag of White Lily flour suggests shortening. Alton Brown looks like he splits the difference with half shortening, half butter (which is a combo I use for my snickerdoodle cookies.) Cooks Illustrated uses all butter.

Scones are usually butter, but can also be made with lard or a mix of lard and butter. Lots of different scones recipes out there.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-29-2019 at 09:26 AM.
  #25  
Old 11-29-2019, 09:25 AM
BigT's Avatar
BigT is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: "Hicksville", Ark.
Posts: 36,846
The thing about making the dinner, at least in my family, is that there is expected to be a lot of leftovers. So, sure, there's a lot of food, but you don't eat a lot of it. You'll get two meals out of it on Thanksgiving Day, and then more stuff to carry around later.

So, sure, the rolls do seem like a bit much. But some really like them, and get little of the other starches or reduce the veg. And then there's stuff left over for later.

We also tend to do that when we eat out, in my experience. For example, instead of cooking the meal this year, we went to a restaurant that was open. And, even normally, it allows you to get both the buffet/salad bar and a main course for the same price as just the buffet. So of course I still have leftovers--the buffet stuff alone is enough for meal, and I can save the main course for later.
  #26  
Old 11-29-2019, 09:27 AM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 85,793
Oh, I knew I was missing something: A dinner roll is never called a "bun". In American English, "bun" means one of two things: It's either the thing you serve a hamburger or other sandwich on, or it's a sweet sticky thing like a cinnamon bun or hot cross bun. Both of those can also sometimes be called some sort of roll (like a Kaiser roll or a cinnamon roll), but without any modifier, "roll" means a smaller thing, individual-sized but usually baked close-packed in a pan so they have to be pulled apart, and too small to make a standard sandwich out of (but possibly a small sandwich).
  #27  
Old 11-29-2019, 10:12 AM
terentii's Avatar
terentii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 18,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
That was a GREAT show! [/aside]
The episode is "Mail Fraud," which allegedly introduced the word "staycation" to the English language, though I seem to remember it coming earlier.

While y'all are celebrating Turkey Day, I'm in my apartment in Moscow chowing down on roast chicken with tropical salsa and Cuban black beans with rice. Yum! All I need now is a cold beer.

I went out to dinner with my daughter for Canadian Thanksgiving back in October. Nowhere near as good as a real home-cooked meal.
__________________
"Makes you wonder why we bother, eh, Fawlty?"
"Didn't know you did, Major."

Last edited by terentii; 11-29-2019 at 10:13 AM.
  #28  
Old 11-29-2019, 10:30 AM
terentii's Avatar
terentii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 18,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Aren't biscuits made with either? From my research, it's an argument in the biscuit-making community as to which to use.
"Chef at Home" Michael Smith* recommends freezing your butter and then grating it into the bowl with the flour before gently mixing the dough. This is supposed to create little pockets of steam inside the biscuits as they bake and the butter melts, making them extra tender and flaky.

*If you've lived in Canada, you probably know him; not sure about the US.
__________________
"Makes you wonder why we bother, eh, Fawlty?"
"Didn't know you did, Major."
  #29  
Old 11-29-2019, 11:10 AM
margin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,278
Oooh, thank you for the recipe, I will try it at once!
__________________
They delight in acting in bad faith, since they seek not to persuade by sound argument but to intimidate and disconcert. If you press them too closely, they will abruptly fall silent, loftily indicating by some phrase that the time for argument is past.
  #30  
Old 11-29-2019, 12:48 PM
romansperson's Avatar
romansperson is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Aren't biscuits made with either?
A proper traditional Southern biscuit is made with lard or Crisco. It's what people traditionally had. Most people were poor and butter was expensive. They were also often served only for special occasions like Sunday dinner. Other days were mostly cornbread* instead.

I don't have any scone recipes that use anything other than butter and I don't think I have ever had any that were made with anything else (though of course I wouldn't be surprised at all if commercially made ones use a less expensive fat).

Of course anyone is free at any time to use whatever they want and name the end product whatever they wish!

*and let's not even get started on the opinions on how that is made …
  #31  
Old 11-29-2019, 12:55 PM
ThelmaLou's Avatar
ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by romansperson View Post
...Of course anyone is free at any time to use whatever they want and name the end product whatever they wish!
...
Only if you're not afraid of the Southern Grandma showing up in the middle of dinner! The knock on the door from that rolling pin can strike terror in the heart of the strongest good ol' boy.
__________________
“Master, I’ve discovered the answer! Knock and the door will be opened to you.” The master replied, “Who said the door was closed?”
  #32  
Old 11-29-2019, 12:58 PM
romansperson's Avatar
romansperson is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Only if you're not afraid of the Southern Grandma showing up in the middle of dinner! The knock on the door from that rolling pin can strike terror in the heart of the strongest good ol' boy.
Ha!
  #33  
Old 11-29-2019, 02:04 PM
D'Anconia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 4,667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
I have learnt something.

"Rolls" seems to be used in place of "buns".

I never talk of rolls. Except the occasional lobster roll if i'm in the Maritimes.
Rolls.

https://www.loblaws.ca/Food/Bakery/B.../p/20158425_EA
  #34  
Old 11-29-2019, 02:06 PM
pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 48,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by terentii View Post
"Chef at Home" Michael Smith* recommends freezing your butter and then grating it into the bowl with the flour before gently mixing the dough. This is supposed to create little pockets of steam inside the biscuits as they bake and the butter melts, making them extra tender and flaky.

*If you've lived in Canada, you probably know him; not sure about the US.
That what I remember Cooks Illustrated recommending as well in one of their biscuit recipes. Personally, these days I just do the two ingredient biscuits, using equal parts by weight self rising flour and heavy cream.
  #35  
Old 11-29-2019, 06:16 PM
actualliberalnotoneofthose is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,446
We definitely have special rolls, made with my late MIL's recipe (probably her mother's or grandmother's), using a special pan that is only used for that and only for holidays.

Yeah, they are bread rolls. Yeah, they are good. Nothing extraordinary about them though, IMHO.

As an aside I laugh at the typical comments about holiday gorging and expanding waistlines. As a healthy non-sedentary adult, the worst that happens from a big holiday meal is 2-3 pounds of temporary water weight gain and then I'll be back to regular (not to be confused with "standard American") lifestyle in 24 hours. In fact, today I woke up and worked out and ate my one meal of heaping leftovers and it was great.
  #36  
Old 11-30-2019, 02:52 PM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,478
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Only if you're not afraid of the Southern Grandma showing up in the middle of dinner! The knock on the door from that rolling pin can strike terror in the heart of the strongest good ol' boy.
Yes, but if Grandma wasn't invited in the first place, there's probably deeper issues than how the mealtime bread was made.
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #37  
Old 11-30-2019, 03:23 PM
Skywatcher's Avatar
Skywatcher is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 35,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by romansperson View Post
They are flaky and split apart easily, which means they make great carriers for leftovers - split one in half, slap a slice of ham or turkey on, add whatever other ingredients you want (cranberry sauce, gravy, a slice of cheese, etc.), top with the other half of the biscuit, and that's some mighty fine eating right there.
Yeah, my family does this for breakfast the morning after. We prefer proper* croissants, though.



*As opposed to the tiny little things that come out of those Pillsbury canisters.
  #38  
Old 11-30-2019, 03:52 PM
Hilarity N. Suze is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 8,100
I usually make either cheese puffs (gougeres) or Parker House rolls, and I am asked to make them if I'm not hosting, and there are never any left over. They aren't the easiest thing to pack up and take somewhere though, because you want them fresh out of the oven for the meal. At least in the case of the Parker House rolls. Gougeres not so much.
  #39  
Old 11-30-2019, 05:37 PM
ThelmaLou's Avatar
ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha Twit View Post
Yes, but if Grandma wasn't invited in the first place, there's probably deeper issues than how the mealtime bread was made.
She was coming back from the grave with that rolling pin.
__________________
“Master, I’ve discovered the answer! Knock and the door will be opened to you.” The master replied, “Who said the door was closed?”
  #40  
Old 11-30-2019, 08:56 PM
romansperson's Avatar
romansperson is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
She was coming back from the grave with that rolling pin.
“The past is never dead. It's not even past.” - William Faulkner
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:38 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017