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  #101  
Old 12-30-2018, 11:49 AM
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Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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When I was young I took a walking stick with me to go hiking in the woods. Now I use it to get up and down the curb.

Everyone thinks I'm so witty simply because I have a huge repertoire of corny old jokes they haven't heard yet.
  #102  
Old 12-30-2018, 03:05 PM
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TruCelt TruCelt is offline
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You remember:

When software did what you told it to, not what it guessed you probably really wanted given what you just told it to do. And you could hit "Reveal codes" and figure out precisely what was going wrong with your word processing document. Dear Og how I miss that!

When you could take the phone off the hook and be blamelessly unreachable for hours at a time.

When coconut oil was the stuff of the devil and could destroy your heart at ten paces.

Last edited by TruCelt; 12-30-2018 at 03:07 PM.
  #103  
Old 12-30-2018, 03:58 PM
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I'm 69 now. When I was in high school, we learned typing on manual (that's non-electric) typewriters. Correction paper existed then, and we had an electric typewriter at home, but in class we had to erase our mistakes. I saw it as having to punish myself for my own errors. Computers made all that much easier, but that was years later.

My older brother took calculus in HS, and he had slide rules. He later went to Purdue to learn ninjaneering.

When Dad's doctor told him about cholesterol, we switched from butter to margarine. That was before we knew trans fats in margarine were deadlier than butter.
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  #104  
Old 12-30-2018, 04:24 PM
dorvann dorvann is offline
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This thread reminds of the internet before the World Wide Web -- bulletin boards, Usenet, etc. Using dial-up of course and the infamous screeching sound of the modem dialing.

Here's a clip of the sound for anyone nostalgic for it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsNaR6FRuO0

Also how many people under 30 know how to use a computer without GUI; you know through text inputs like MS-DOS.
  #105  
Old 12-30-2018, 04:53 PM
notthatagain notthatagain is offline
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When 'three on the tree' far outnumbered 'four on the floor'.


Vent windows.


P.F. Flyers and Red Ball Jets.


"Colored" was the respectful way to describe "Negros" in Detroit.



Calling your friend out to play meant singing a two syllable version of their name (Deb-ee, Deb-ee) at the back door.


We played 'Stretch' (a version of Mumblety-peg) which required the throwing a knife near the foot of your opponent. Repeatedly.


We played football and other group games in the street. When we saw an approaching vehicle somebody hollered "Car" and we stepped to the curb. Gave Darwin a fair shot.
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  #106  
Old 12-30-2018, 08:08 PM
Newtosite Newtosite is offline
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You also can't call and check to see if the guy (or person-of-interest) is married. Oh, the stuff you could find out before caller i.d.[/QUOTE]

But on the other hand, the internet makes it easier to find lots of information about people.
  #107  
Old 12-30-2018, 10:15 PM
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ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtosite View Post
Quote:
You also can't call and check to see if the guy (or person-of-interest) is married. Oh, the stuff you could find out before caller i.d.
But on the other hand, the internet makes it easier to find lots of information about people.
Too twoo. You can find out lots of background, but not if s/he's home right now.
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  #108  
Old 12-31-2018, 01:44 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
You remember a gallon of gas costing only $2.10.
Hell, I remember vowing I would never pay 50 cents for a gallon of gas, because there were always places over in the bad part of town that had not raised it to that lofty price yet.
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  #109  
Old 12-31-2018, 02:08 AM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is offline
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Hell, I remember vowing I would never pay 50 cents for a gallon of gas, because there were always places over in the bad part of town that had not raised it to that lofty price yet.
I remember only buying 5 gallons at a gas station because I needed gas and they were charging $38.9 a gallon.
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  #110  
Old 12-31-2018, 02:45 AM
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I remember the first electronic calculator I saw. It was a basic 4-function calculator, large and thick, that worked with AA batteries and had a green LED display. It was absolutely amazing. The answers came up instantly!

I also had a slide-rule that I loved. And later HP 21C and HP 25C calculators when they first came out. Now I have a fancy RPN calculator on my phone.
  #111  
Old 12-31-2018, 02:53 AM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
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I remember my dad trying to quit smoking his menthol kools because they went up to a dollar in the early 80s...he was not successful......
  #112  
Old 12-31-2018, 09:23 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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Yesterday the thought occurred to me that many people alive today will ring in the year 2100.

My jaw just dropped.
  #113  
Old 12-31-2018, 09:34 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
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My favorite one of these is...

The interval between the release of The Beatle's Let it Be and Nirvana's Nevermind - 21 years - is significantly less than that between the release of Nevermind and now - 27 years.
  #114  
Old 12-31-2018, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
You remember where you were on 9/11.

You remember when you only had to charge your cell phone every four days.

You remember texting your friends by pushing the number buttons multiple times to get each letter.

You traded pogs with your friends when the teacher couldn't see.

You remember a gallon of gas costing only $2.10.

You could only get the movie times on your cell phone by calling the theater.

Your school only one computer per classroom, and you had to ask to use it.

You couldn't wait to get home from school so you could get on AOL Instant Messenger with your friends.
We found the 30 year old!
  #115  
Old 12-31-2018, 10:19 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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You remember playing in an environment that no parent would allow today: We used to sled down a hill right by the Massachusetts Turnpike. The game was to see who could stop closest to the Pike. Any parent allowing their children to do that today would be arrested and have taken away.

And we sled on pieces of cardboard.
  #116  
Old 12-31-2018, 10:22 AM
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Colibri Colibri is offline
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Oh and I remember a time when if I fell I bounced. Now I just go thud with no bounce.
Several years ago I was coming down a steep trail and the ACL in my knee partly snapped and I fell down. It's still not completely right.

I thought to myself, it used to be that I fell down and something broke. Now something breaks and I fall down.
  #117  
Old 12-31-2018, 08:47 PM
Chessic Sense Chessic Sense is offline
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Discussion Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermitian View Post
We found the 30 year old!
1. Chessic Sense posted a series of things that make a Millennial feel old. Do you think he is being sincere in his post? Why or why not?

2. CS begins by mentioning 9/11. Why might this event have enough importance to be mentioned first?

3. What do you think is the significance of CS's multiple references to antiquated technology? Discuss.

4. What does Chessic Sense's post say about the relativism of age and aging? Write a 5-paragraph essay about this.

Last edited by Chessic Sense; 12-31-2018 at 08:48 PM.
  #118  
Old 12-31-2018, 08:51 PM
dorvann dorvann is offline
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Quote:
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My favorite one of these is...

The interval between the release of The Beatle's Let it Be and Nirvana's Nevermind - 21 years - is significantly less than that between the release of Nevermind and now - 27 years.
The interval between the Challenger shuttle explosion and the 9/11 attack is 15 years; the interval between the 9/11 attack and now is 17 years.
  #119  
Old 01-02-2019, 09:33 PM
Rilchiam Rilchiam is offline
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People born in the year 2000 are now eligible for the Death Pool.
  #120  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:08 PM
markn+ markn+ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
1. Chessic Sense posted a series of things that make a Millennial feel old. Do you think he is being sincere in his post? Why or why not?
He's probably sincere. It doesn't matter. Millennials are not old. I've explained this to my son many times.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
2. CS begins by mentioning 9/11. Why might this event have enough importance to be mentioned first?
Because it's an extremely memorable event which is far enough in the past to seem like a long time ago to a Millennial. But it isn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
3. What do you think is the significance of CS's multiple references to antiquated technology? Discuss.
Modern technology changes so fast that even a kid like a Millennial can remember technology from just a few years ago that is now obsolete.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
4. What does Chessic Sense's post say about the relativism of age and aging? Write a 5-paragraph essay about this.
No.
  #121  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:16 PM
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ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
2. CS begins by mentioning 9/11. Why might this event have enough importance to be mentioned first?
Because it's an extremely memorable event which is far enough in the past to seem like a long time ago to a Millennial. But it isn't.

....
My 28-year old grandson believes that modern history began on 9/11 and that nothing much noteworthy happened before that. Seriously.
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  #122  
Old 01-03-2019, 12:49 AM
Pastork Pastork is offline
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In a similar vein...

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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
I've recently been re-watching Mad Men. It occurred to me that, for kids who are now the same age as I was during the Sixties, those events are as remote in time as WWI was for me at that age (both about 50 years or more in the past).
When I was born, the Civil War was not quite as far in the past as WW I is for a child born today. And I watched the first Moon landing with a man who remembered a time before airplanes (my grandfather).
  #123  
Old 01-03-2019, 12:59 AM
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And I watched the first Moon landing with a man who remembered a time before airplanes (my grandfather).
My grandmother excitedly watched the first Moon landing. She would have been in her mid-teens when the Wright brothers made their flight at Kitty Hawk. She was very impressed by Apollo 11.
  #124  
Old 01-03-2019, 02:27 AM
Rilchiam Rilchiam is offline
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My 28-year old grandson believes that modern history began on 9/11 and that nothing much noteworthy happened before that. Seriously.
Well, I can kind of see how he could think that. Of course it's not true, but it would seem so to someone who was 10 when 9/11 happened, because it changed so much going forward. Same thing with the JFK assassination, Pearl Harbor and the crash of 1929. Everything changes, very abruptly and to a great degree, and everything on the other side of that dividing line is from another era. If you were too young, or not even born yet, during that earlier era to remember much about it, naturally it seems irrelevant. Especially when that was peacetime and now the country is at war, or that was a time of prosperity and now everyone's poor, or that was a time of peace and not having to take your shoes off in airports. I doubt teens and young adults in the 1930s knew much about the Gilded Age, either.
  #125  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:00 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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Yesterday, Captain of "Captain and Tennille", died.


And I remember their act well.
  #126  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:09 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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When I was born, the Civil War was not quite as far in the past as WW I is for a child born today. And I watched the first Moon landing with a man who remembered a time before airplanes (my grandfather).
When I was younger I knew some older men who had known actual Civil War veterans.

I love these 'links". Where you knew a person who long ago knew a person of a major historical event.

This man was the last surviving person who witnessed Abraham Lincolns assassination.
  #127  
Old 01-03-2019, 07:22 AM
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When I was born, the Civil War was not quite as far in the past as WW I is for a child born today.
I remember perfectly well the Civil War centennial in my childhood. My neighborhood in Phoenix had irrigation for the lawns which meant there was a berm between each yard. Most were less than a foot tall but since the topography had a slight slope to it, a few were more like two-feet high on the downhill side. After looking at all those Matthew Brady photos of soldiers lined up in a trench, the extra high ones became our parapet.
  #128  
Old 01-03-2019, 07:26 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
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Tthis man was the last surviving person who witnessed Abraham Lincolns assassination.
Please, could you tell us that you're linking to a video that starts automatically? I would like to choose whether I want to see a video, rather than have one forced upon me.

I had a few relatives that were alive during the US Civil war. I met them, I was very young and they were very old, but they remembered the conflict. As Canadians, they played no part. But I heard their stories.

Last edited by Spoons; 01-03-2019 at 07:29 AM.
  #129  
Old 01-03-2019, 07:43 AM
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ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Well, I can kind of see how he could think that. Not one bit.
No, I can't see it.
Quote:
Of course it's not true, but it would seem so to someone who was 10 when 9/11 happened, because it changed so much going forward. Same thing with the JFK assassination, Pearl Harbor and the crash of 1929. Everything changes, very abruptly and to a great degree, and everything on the other side of that dividing line is from another era. If you were too young, or not even born yet, during that earlier era to remember much about it, naturally it seems irrelevant. Especially when that was peacetime and now the country is at war, or that was a time of prosperity and now everyone's poor, or that was a time of peace and not having to take your shoes off in airports. I doubt teens and young adults in the 1930s knew much about the Gilded Age, either.
My bold. "Naturally it seems irrelevant"?? I don't think so. Even as a high schooler (when Kennedy was assassinated) I knew a fair amount about what happened right before I was born and in the years prior to that. Hiroshima? World War II? The New Deal? The Great Depression? World War I? The Spanish flu epidemic that killed 20+ million people? The immigrant waves in the early 20th century (my grandparents were part of that)? I learned about those things in school, on TV, in movies, from listening to my parents.

I certainly didn't think history began with my generation. I fear that kind of tunnel vision is characteristic of millennials. I hope they outgrow it.
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  #130  
Old 01-03-2019, 11:59 AM
Si Amigo Si Amigo is offline
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I now have the body of a rock start since Eddie Van Halen, Robert Plant and Peter Gabriel all got fat.
  #131  
Old 01-03-2019, 03:45 PM
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I remember when Bill Gates said that "64K of memory" should be enough for anyone!
Funny...I had a Commodore 64 back in the day. I recently put a screenshot of the GEOS operating system for the c64 as the wallpaper for my iPad. My 21-year-old son raised his eyebrows at this. I had to explain that when I was his age, this was the greatest thing ever.

---

What gets me about growing old is the interval between two separate events seeming longer when I was young as opposed to now (I'm 54). e.g. we watched The Poseidon Adventure for NYE. My son recognized Gene Hackman from Superman: The Movie. I replied, yeah, this was...and I amazed myself when I realized that it was only six years between TPA and S:TM. Whereas OTOH of all the various Spider-Man films, even the first Sam Raimi one (2002) seems like it came out last year, at best.
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  #132  
Old 01-03-2019, 03:58 PM
Cicero Cicero is offline
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10 years ago I swore that I would walk up those final 400 final steps to the top of Saint Pauls Cathedral. Now after experiencing cities where they are designed so that everything is uphill I realise that is long past. My joints and cobblestones are not friends.
  #133  
Old 01-03-2019, 04:43 PM
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Buck Godot Buck Godot is offline
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The cute baby one of my office mates had when I was in grad school is now 3 years older than I was when he was born.

Plus a whole list of other things, although at age 64 you might be too old for them.
  #134  
Old 01-03-2019, 04:53 PM
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The cute baby one of my office mates had when I was in grad school is now 3 years older than I was when he was born.

Plus a whole list of other things, although at age 64 you might be too old for them.
Other people's children--the ones you don't see very often--those are the most potent time-warpers. One day they're starting preschool and the next time you see them, they're graduating med school.
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  #135  
Old 01-04-2019, 09:55 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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Yesterday, a young co-worker and I were putting returned merchandise back on the store's shelves. I told her "You can't put the chocolate bars back on the shelf. You have to toss them." She asked why. "Because of the Tylenol scare."

She did not have a clue what I was talking about. (Google it)
  #136  
Old 01-04-2019, 11:39 AM
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ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Yesterday, a young co-worker and I were putting returned merchandise back on the store's shelves. I told her "You can't put the chocolate bars back on the shelf. You have to toss them." She asked why. "Because of the Tylenol scare."

She did not have a clue what I was talking about. (Google it)
I remember it well. And I think of it every time I open a new bottle of ANYTHING... outer cap sealed in an impenetrable plastic sheath, inner cap sealed with impenetrable foil or heavy cardboard flap. I keep a metal nail file in my pill drawer just to open new bottles. A flamethrower might be useful, too.

And this applies not only to consumables, but to medicinal lotions, gels, creams, etc.
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