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Old 07-29-2019, 10:19 PM
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Snowboarder Bo is offline
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Katy Perry, Dr. Luke, Max Martin (et al.) = plagiarists


Strong copyright laws are good news for songwriters, IMO.
Quote:
A jury on Monday found that Katy Perry’s 2013 hit “Dark Horse” improperly copied a 2009 Christian rap song in a unanimous decision that represented a rare takedown of a pop superstar and her elite producer by a relatively unknown artist.

The verdict by a nine-member federal jury in a Los Angeles courtroom came five years after Marcus Gray and two co-authors, first sued in 2014 alleging “Dark Horse” stole from “Joyful Noise,” a song Gray released under the stage name Flame.
Here's the best part, helpfully bolded and colored red:
Quote:
But in a decision that left many in the courtroom surprised, jurors found all six songwriters and all four corporations that released and distributed the songs were liable, including Perry and Sarah Hudson, who wrote only the song’s words, and Juicy J, who only wrote the rap he provided for the song. Perry was not present when the verdict was read.

Other defendants found liable were Capitol Records as well as Perry’s producers: Dr. Luke, Max Martin and Cirkut, who came up with the song’s beat.
They tried to argue that Joyful Noise was too simple to qualify for copyright AND besides, none of them had ever heard it.
Quote:
But the jury of six women and three men disagreed, finding that the bumping beat and riff at the center of “Joyful Noise” were original enough to be copyrighted.

Perry and the song’s co-authors testified during the seven-day trial that none of them had heard the song or heard of Gray before the lawsuit, nor did they listen to Christian music.
Quote:
“They’re trying to shove Mr. Gray into some gospel music alleyway that no one ever visits,” said plaintiffs’ attorney Michael A. Kahn during closing arguments, when he also pointed out that Perry had begun her career as a Christian artist.
I've never head of him, but Christian music isn't exactly my thing; turns out he's quite popular:
Quote:
Gray’s attorneys had only to demonstrate, however, that “Joyful Noise” had wide dissemination and could have been heard by Perry and her co-authors. They provided as evidence that it had millions of plays on YouTube and Spotify, and that the album it’s included on was nominated for a Grammy.
Whoops… yeah; hard to believe this bunch didn't listen to stuff that was nominated for a Grammy in the last decade or two.
Quote:
Jurors agreed, finding that the song was distributed widely enough that the “Dark Horse” writers may well have heard it.
Quote:
The case now goes to a penalty phase, where the jury will decide how much Perry and other defendants owe for copyright infringement.
Stories from songwriters who have tried to work with some of these folks and found themselves unable to stomach it are full of events, posturing and outright theft waaaaaay out there beyond the bounds of what most people would find acceptable in a professional setting, yet I have no reason to doubt and many reasons to believe their tales. This verdict doesn't surprise me. I hope it isn't overturned on appeal, or the damage awards reduced to an inconsequential amount.
 

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