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  #1651  
Old 04-24-2019, 05:18 AM
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April 24, 1967: Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov dies in Soyuz 1 when its parachute fails to open. After many, many mechanical problems (Komarov insists before the flight that his funeral be open-casket so that the Soviet leadership could see what they had done.), he successfully re-enters the Earth's atmosphere on his 19th orbit, but the module's drogue and main braking parachute fails to deploy correctly. The module crashes into the ground, killing Komarov. He screams until he hits the Earth. He is the first human to die during a space mission.
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:03 PM
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April 25, 1901: New York becomes the first U.S. state to require automobile license plates. At first, only the owner’s initials must be clearly visible on the back of the vehicle. Then, in 1903, plates with black numerals on a white background will be required. At first, plates are not issued by the state, and motorists are obliged to make their own.

The earliest plates are made of porcelain baked onto iron or ceramic with no backing, which make them fragile and impractical. Few of these early plates survive. Later experimental materials will include cardboard, leather, plastic, and, during wartime shortages, copper and pressed soybeans.
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Old 04-25-2019, 11:36 PM
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April 26, 1989: The Daulatpur-Saturia tornado in Bangladesh kills over 1300. This is the deadliest single tornado in recorded history.
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Old 04-26-2019, 05:20 AM
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April 26, 1986: A nuclear reactor accident occurs at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Soviet Union (now Ukraine), creating the world's worst nuclear disaster. Practically all of the radioactive material goes on to fallout/precipitate onto much of the surface of the western USSR and Europe. Models predict that by 2065 about 16,000 cases of thyroid cancer and 25,000 cases of other cancers may be expected due to radiation from the accident.
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Old 04-27-2019, 02:42 AM
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April 27, 1667: John Milton, blind and impoverished, sells the publication rights for Paradise Lost to publisher Samuel Simmons for £5 (equivalent to approximately £770 in 2015 purchasing power), with a further £5 to be paid if and when each print run of 1,300-1,500 copies sells out.
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Old 04-28-2019, 03:53 AM
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April 28, 1967: Muhammad Ali refuses his induction into the United States Army, citing his religious beliefs and opposition to the Vietnam War. He is arrested, found guilty of draft evasion, and stripped of his boxing titles. He will appeal the decision to the Supreme Court, which will overturn his conviction in 1971. But he will not have fought for nearly four years, and will lose a period of peak performance as an athlete.

His actions as a conscientious objector to the war will make him an icon for the larger counterculture generation, and he will be a high-profile figure of racial pride for African Americans during the civil rights movement.
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Old 04-29-2019, 12:18 AM
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April 29, 1945: Adolf Hitler marries his longtime partner Eva Anna Paula Braun in his Berlin bunker, as Red Army troops fight their way into the neighborhood. He is 56 and she is 33. The event is witnessed by Joseph Goebbels and Martin Bormann. Thereafter, Hitler hosts a modest wedding breakfast with his new wife. When Braun marries Hitler, her legal name changes to Eva Hitler. When she signs her marriage certificate she writes the letter B for her family name, then crosses this out and replaces it with Hitler.

After less than 40 hours of marital bliss, Hitler and Braun will both commit suicide, she by biting into a capsule of cyanide, and he by a gunshot to the head. The corpses will be carried up the stairs and through the bunker's emergency exit to the garden behind the Reich Chancellery, where they'll be burned. The charred remains will be found by the Soviets, who will secretly bury them in East Germany. In 1970, a Soviet KGB team will thoroughly burn and crush the remains, and dump the ashes into the Biederitz river.

The German public is unaware of Braun's relationship with Hitler until after their deaths. It seems the German public is unaware of a lot of things.
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Old 04-30-2019, 01:55 AM
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April 30, 1789: On the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York City, the nation’s capitol, George Washington takes the oath of office to become the first elected President of the United States. As judges of the federal courts have not yet been appointed, the presidential oath of office is administered by Chancellor Robert Livingston, the highest judicial officer in the state of New York. Washington takes the oath on the building's second floor balcony, in view of throngs of people gathered on the streets. The Bible used in the ceremony is from St. John's Lodge No. 1, Ancient York Masons, and is opened at random to Genesis 49:13. Afterward, Livingston shouts "Long live George Washington, President of the United States!" Historian John R. Alden will indicate that Washington added the words "so help me God" to the oath prescribed by the constitution.
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:11 AM
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May 1, 1999: SpongeBob SquarePants premieres on Nickelodeon after the 1999 Kids' Choice Awards. Many of the ideas for the series originated in an unpublished educational comic book titled The Intertidal Zone, which Stephen Hillenburg created in 1989. He began developing SpongeBob SquarePants into a television series in 1996 upon the cancellation of Rocko's Modern Life, and turned to Tom Kenny, who had worked with him on that series, to voice the title character. SpongeBob was originally going to be named SpongeBoy, and the series was to be called SpongeBoy Ahoy!, but both of these were changed, as the name was already trademarked.

The series has won a variety of awards, including six Annie Awards, eight Golden Reel Awards, four Emmy Awards, 16 Kids' Choice Awards, and two BAFTA Children's Awards. Despite its widespread popularity, the series has been involved in several public controversies, including one centered on speculation over SpongeBob's intended sexual orientation.
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Old 05-02-2019, 02:48 AM
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May 2, 1920: The first game of the Negro National League baseball is played in Indianapolis. The eight initial teams are the Chicago American Giants, Detroit Stars, Kansas City Monarchs, Indianapolis ABCs, St. Louis Giants, Cuban Stars, Dayton Marcos and Chicago Giants. The new league is the first African-American baseball circuit to achieve stability and last more than one season. At first the league operates mainly in midwestern cities; in 1924 it will expand into the south, adding franchises in Birmingham and Memphis.

The NNL will survive controversies over umpiring, scheduling, and what some will perceive as league president Rube Foster's disproportionate influence and favoritism toward his own team. It will also outlast Foster's decline into mental illness in 1926, and its eastern rival, the ECL, which will fold in early 1928. The NNL will finally fall apart in 1931 under the economic stress of the Great Depression.
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Old 05-03-2019, 06:45 AM
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May 3, 1978: The first unsolicited bulk commercial email (which will later become known as "spam") is sent by Gary Thuerk, a Digital Equipment Corporation marketing representative, to all 600 ARPANET addresses on the west coast of the United States. Mr. Thuerk is reprimanded and told not to do it again.
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:26 AM
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May 4, 1970: The Kent State Massacre of unarmed college students by members of the Ohio National Guard at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, during a mass protest against the bombing of Cambodia by United States military forces. Twenty-eight guardsmen fire approximately 67 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others.

Two of the four students killed, Allison Krause and Jeffrey Miller, had participated in the protest. The other two, Sandra Scheuer and William Knox Schroeder, were walking from one class to the next at the time of their deaths. Schroeder was also a member of the campus ROTC battalion. One of the injured, Dean R. Kahler, suffers fractures of his vertebrae, causing permanent paralysis from the chest down. Kahler was walking from one class to another, and briefly stopped to see what the protest was about.

Some of the students who are shot had been protesting against the Cambodian Campaign, which President Richard Nixon announced during a television address on April 30. Other students who are shot had been walking nearby or observing the protest from a distance.

There will be a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools will have closed throughout the United States, due to a strike of 4 million students, and the event will further affect public opinion, at an already socially contentious time, over the role of the United States in the Vietnam War.

Students from Kent State and other universities will often get a hostile reaction upon returning home. Some will be told that more students should have been killed, to teach student protesters a lesson; some students will be disowned by their families.
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Old 05-05-2019, 10:18 AM
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May 5, 1961: Alan Shepard becomes the first American to travel into outer space, on a sub-orbital flight. He has named his spacecraft Freedom 7. When reporters ask Shepard what he thinks about as he sits atop the Redstone rocket, waiting for liftoff, he replies, “The fact that every part of this ship was built by the lowest bidder." Shepard stays on a suborbital trajectory for the 15-minute flight, which is seen live on television by millions.

One thing that is not seen by the public is Shepard's pre-launch "emergency". Because the entire journey was only expected to take fifteen minutes, Shepard's suit does not have any provision for elimination of bodily wastes. After being strapped into the capsule's seat, launch delays keep him in that suit for eight hours; Shepard's endurance gives out before launch, and he is forced to empty his bladder into the suit, which shorts out the medical sensors attached to it to track the astronaut's condition in flight. After Shepard's flight, NASA will call in the space suit's manufacturer, B. F. Goodrich, and by the time of John Glenn's Mercury-Atlas 6 orbital flight the following year, a liquid waste collection feature will be built into the suit.
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Old 05-05-2019, 10:38 AM
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May 5, 1821: Napoleon dies.
  #1665  
Old 05-06-2019, 02:31 AM
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May 6, 2013: Three women missing for more than a decade are found alive in the home of Ariel Castro, in the Tremont neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio. Michelle Knight, Amanda Berry, and Georgina "Gina" DeJesus had been kidnapped by Ariel Castro and held captive in his home. They had been subsequently imprisoned until Berry escapes with her then-six-year-old daughter and contacts the police. Knight and DeJesus are rescued by responding officers, and Castro is arrested within hours.

Two day later, Castro will be charged with four counts of kidnapping and three counts of rape. He will plead guilty to 937 criminal counts of rape, kidnapping, and aggravated murder as part of a plea bargain. He’ll be sentenced to life plus 1,000 years in prison without the possibility of parole. One month into his sentence, Castro will commit suicide by hanging himself with bed sheets in his prison cell.
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Old 05-06-2019, 03:03 AM
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Shit, I've got a really bad taste in my mouth after posting that. Rot in hell, monster.
  #1667  
Old 05-07-2019, 01:27 AM
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May 7, 1915: German submarine U-20 sinks RMS Lusitania, the world’s largest passenger ship, off the southern coast of Ireland, killing 1,198 people. The ship had been bound for Liverpool from New York, and had been scheduled to dock later that afternoon. Aboard her are 1,266 passengers and a crew of 696, which combined total to 1,962 people. Following the U-20’s attack there is a second unexplained internal explosion, probably that of munitions she had been carrying, send her to the seabed in 18 minutes. In all, only six out of 48 lifeboats are launched successfully, with several more overturning and breaking apart.

In spite of her carrying war munitions, Lusitania was technically unarmed and was carrying thousands of civilian passengers, and so the British government will accuse the Germans of breaching the Cruiser Rules. The sinking will cause a storm of protest in the United States, because 128 American citizens were among the dead. The sinking will help shift public opinion in the United States against Germany, and will be one of the factors in the United States' declaration of war nearly two years later.
  #1668  
Old 05-07-2019, 08:57 AM
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May 7, 1945: Germany surrenders unconditionally to the Allies, and the war in Europe is over.

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Old 05-08-2019, 02:38 AM
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May 8, 1902: In one of the deadliest volcanic disasters in history, Mt. Pelee on Martinique erupts, killing over 30,000 people. Most deaths are caused by pyroclastic flows which destroy the city of Saint-Pierre, which had been the largest city on the island, within minutes of the eruption. It will be reported that out of the 30,000 in the city, there are only two survivors: Louis-Auguste Cyparis, a felon held in an underground cell in the town's jail, and Léon Compère-Léandre, a man who had lived at the edge of the city. In reality, there are a number of survivors who made their way out of the fringes of the blast zone. Many of these survivors are horribly burned, and some will later die from their injuries.

On a trip to Martinique in 1998, I stood in Louis-Auguste Cyparis’ cell, and I climbed Mt. Pelee. Very foggy, wet and muddy.
  #1670  
Old 05-08-2019, 04:42 PM
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May 8, 1842: The Versailles rail accident in France kills nearly 200. A broken accident on the locomotive led to passenger cars piling up and catching fire. At the time it was the world's deadliest railroad accident.
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Old 05-09-2019, 04:39 AM
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May 9, 1974: The United States House Committee on the Judiciary opens formal and public impeachment hearings against President Richard Nixon.

On February 6, The Committee was authorised by Resolution 803 of the House “to investigate fully and completely whether sufficient grounds exist for the House of Representatives to exercise its constitutional power to impeach Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States of America.” The motion was carried by 410-4 and instructed the Committee to “report to the House of Representatives such resolutions, articles of impeachment, or other recommendations as it deems proper.”

Today, on May 9, under the chairmanship of Peter Rodino, the Committee begins public hearings to review the results of the Impeachment Inquiry staff’s investigation.

This will not end well for Nixon.
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Old 05-09-2019, 09:04 PM
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May 9, 1877: The Iquique earthquake in Chile kills over 2300. Most of these deaths occur not in South America, but thousands of miles across the ocean on the Fiji islands as a result of a tsunami. There were also five deaths in Hawaii.
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Old 05-09-2019, 11:37 PM
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May 10, 1994: Barbra Streisand begins her first concert tour in 27 years.

In 1993, The New York Times music critic Stephen Holden wrote that Streisand "enjoys a cultural status that only one other American entertainer, Frank Sinatra, has achieved in the last half century". In September 1993, Streisand announced her first public concert appearances in 27 years. What began as a two-night New Year's event at the MGM Grand Las Vegas led to a multi-city tour in the summer of 1994. Tickets for the tour were sold out in under an hour. Streisand also appeared on the covers of major magazines in anticipation of what Time magazine named "The Music Event of the Century". The tour is one of the biggest all-media merchandise parlays in history. Ticket prices range from $50 to $1,500, making Streisand the highest-paid concert performer in history. Barbra Streisand: The Concert will go on to be the top-grossing concert of the year and earn five Emmy Awards and the Peabody Award, while the taped broadcast on HBO will be the highest-rated concert special in HBO's 30-year history.
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Old 05-10-2019, 12:26 AM
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May 10, 1849: The Astor Place Riot in New York leaves somewhere between 25 and 31 dead, and over a hundred injured. This is also known as the Shakespeare Riot because the dispute at the Astor Opera House involved different interpretations of MacBeth. Really. The working class preferred rugged American Edwin Forrest's performance, while the well-heeled New York elite liked English actor William Charles Macready. The two actors were rivals and when working class mobs tried to get tickets and get into the theater to jeer Macready, the police and local militia intervened, the crowd became unruly and a bunch of people were shot. At the time, The Astor Place Riot caused the largest number of civilian casualties in America since the Revolutionary War.
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Old 05-11-2019, 05:41 AM
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May 11, 1960: In Buenos Aires, Argentina, four Israeli Mossad agents capture fugitive Nazi Adolf Eichmann who has been living under the alias of Ricardo Klement. Eichmann had been one of the major organizers of the Holocaust.

Eichmann will be brought to Israel to stand trial on 15 criminal charges, including war crimes, crimes against humanity, and crimes against the Jewish people. During the trial, he will not deny the Holocaust or his role in organizing it, but will claim that he was simply following orders in a totalitarian Führerprinzip system. He will be found guilty on all of the charges, and will be executed by hanging on June 1, 1962.
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:38 AM
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May 11, 1996: 8 climbers are killed in a blizzard on Mt. Everest. The disaster is described vividly in John Krakauer's best seller Into Thin Air.
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Old 05-12-2019, 12:40 AM
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May 12, 1846: The Donner Party of pioneers departs Independence, Missouri, for California, on what will become a year-long journey of hardship and cannibalism. Delayed by a series of mishaps, they will spend the winter of 1846–47 snowbound in the Sierra Nevada. Some of the emigrants will resort to cannibalism to survive, eating the bodies of those who had succumbed to starvation and sickness.

The journey west usually takes between four and six months, but the Donner Party will be slowed by following a new route called Hastings Cutoff, which crosses Utah's Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake Desert. The rugged terrain, and the difficulties they will later encounter while traveling along the Humboldt River in future Nevada, will result in the loss of many cattle and wagons, and splits within the group.

By the beginning of November 1846 the emigrants will reach the Sierra Nevada, where they will become trapped by an early, heavy snowfall near Truckee Lake, high in the mountains. Their food supplies will run low, and in mid-December some of the group will set out on foot to obtain help. Rescuers from California will attempt to reach the emigrants, but the first relief party will not arrive until the middle of February 1847, almost four months after the wagon train will become trapped. Of the 87 members of the party, only 48 will survive to reach California.

Historians will describe the episode as one of the most spectacular tragedies in Californian history and in the record of western migration.
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:13 AM
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May 13, 1637: Cardinal Richelieu of France reputedly creates the table knife. The distinguishing feature of a table knife is its blunt or rounded end. Richelieu’s invention is an attempt to cure dinner guests of the habit of picking their teeth with their knife-points.

Later, in 1669, King Louis XIV of France will ban pointed knives in the street and at his table, insisting on blunt tips, in the hope that it would reduce violence.
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Old 05-13-2019, 09:00 PM
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May 13, 1972: The Sennichi Department Store Building Fire in Osaka, Japan kills 118 and injures 78.
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Old 05-13-2019, 11:20 PM
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May 14, 1932: The “WE WANT BEER!” parade in New York City.

During the height of the Great Depression, getting 100,000 people hyped up about anything other than available paid work would seem an impossible task. Jobs are scarce, money is tight, and morale is low. But there is one thing that can drive the masses to the streets of New York City in the thousands – Beer.

On this day, New York City Mayor and consummate showman Jimmy Walker leads a “Beer for Taxation” march, which popularly becomes known as the “We Want Beer!” parade, through the streets of the city. “The parade will furnish the best count of noses I can think of, much better than the passing of resolutions, or the writing of letters to Representatives in Congress,” Walker explains to The New York Times. An estimated 100,000 people turn out to show their distaste for Prohibition and the 18th Amendment, and their love for beer.

When Congressman Emanuel Celler hears about the event, he states that he’d come and bring a bunch of friends. You’re able to pick him out in the crowd by the two signs he’s holding: “Never Say Dry” and “Open the Spigots and Drown the Bigots.” The Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion and the Grand Army of the Republic (a group of Civil War veterans) also turn out to march in the parade. Students and society matrons alike also join the fray.
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Old 05-15-2019, 12:27 AM
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May 15, 1836: Francis Baily observes "Baily's beads" during an annular eclipse.

As the moon covers the sun during a solar eclipse, the rugged topography of the lunar limb allows beads of sunlight to shine through in some places while not in others. Lunar topography has considerable relief because of the presence of mountains, craters, valleys, and other topographical features. The irregularities of the lunar limb profile (the "edge" of the Moon, as seen from a distance) are known accurately from observations of grazing occultations of stars. Astronomers thus have a fairly good idea which mountains and valleys will cause the beads to appear in advance of the eclipse. While Baily's beads are seen briefly for a few seconds at the center of the eclipse path, their duration is maximized near the edges of the path of the umbra.
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Old 05-15-2019, 04:30 PM
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May 15, 1850: The Bloody Island massacre in California occurs when somewhere between 150 and 200 Pomo Indians are slaughtered by the U.S. Calvary. Most of the dead are the elderly, women and children.
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Old 05-15-2019, 04:39 PM
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Quote:
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May 15, 1850: The Bloody Island massacre in California occurs when somewhere between 150 and 200 Pomo Indians are slaughtered by the U.S. Cavalry. Most of the dead are the elderly, women and children.
Ugh. Can't even blame spellcheck for that one.
  #1684  
Old 05-15-2019, 07:52 PM
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May 8, 1902: In one of the deadliest volcanic disasters in history, Mt. Pelee on Martinique erupts, killing over 30,000 people. Most deaths are caused by pyroclastic flows which destroy the city of Saint-Pierre, which had been the largest city on the island, within minutes of the eruption. It will be reported that out of the 30,000 in the city, there are only two survivors: Louis-Auguste Cyparis, a felon held in an underground cell in the town's jail, and Léon Compère-Léandre, a man who had lived at the edge of the city. In reality, there are a number of survivors who made their way out of the fringes of the blast zone. Many of these survivors are horribly burned, and some will later die from their injuries.

On a trip to Martinique in 1998, I stood in Louis-Auguste Cyparis’ cell, and I climbed Mt. Pelee. Very foggy, wet and muddy.
I read the book The Day the World Ended https://www.amazon.com/Day-World-End.../dp/0812885104

This would make one hell of a movie.
__________________
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  #1685  
Old 05-15-2019, 11:46 PM
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May 16, 1866: The U.S. Congress replaces the "half dime" coin with the five cent piece, or “nickel".

Half dimes (or “half dismes”), minted since 1792, are much smaller than dimes in diameter and thickness, appearing to be "half dimes". In the 1860s, powerful nickel interests successfully lobby for the creation of new coins, which would be made of a copper-nickel alloy. Production of such coins began in 1865, and were struck in two denominations — three and five cents (the latter introduced in 1866).

The introduction of the copper-nickel five-cent pieces will make the silver coins of the same denomination redundant, and they will be discontinued in 1873.

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This would make one hell of a movie.
I agree.
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Old 05-16-2019, 12:05 AM
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May 16,1918: The Sedition Act of 1918 is enacted, making it illegal to criticize the US Government during wartime. The law is repealed in 1920.

Last edited by Biotop; 05-16-2019 at 12:06 AM.
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Old 05-17-2019, 12:10 AM
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May 17, 1990: The General Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) eliminates homosexuality from their list of psychiatric diseases.

For a long time in Germany, May 17 had been unofficially labelled as a sort of "Gay Day." Written in the date format “17.5.”, it had a natural affinity with Paragraph 175 of the Penal Code, the rule dealing with homosexuality (homosexuals were called "one hundred seventy-fivers”).

The day, as a concept, will be conceived in 2004. A year-long campaign will culminate in the first International Day Against Homophobia on May 17, 2005. 24,000 individuals as well as organizations will sign an appeal to support the "IDAHO initiative". Activities for the day will take place in many countries, including the first LGBT events ever to take place in the Congo, China, and Bulgaria. This day will now be known as the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, and aims to coordinate international events that raise awareness of LGBT rights violations, and stimulate interest in LGBT rights work worldwide. By 2016, the commemorations will place in 132 countries across the globe.
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:46 AM
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May 18, 1927: The Bath Township School Massacre leaves 45 dead including the killer, Andrew Kehoe. Another 58 are wounded. 36 of the dead are children. This is America's deadliest school killing spree.
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Old 05-18-2019, 05:44 AM
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May 18, 1980: Mount St. Helens (known as Lawetlat'la to the indigenous Cowlitz people, and Loowit or Louwala-Clough to the Klickitat) erupts in Washington State, killing 57 people and causing $3 billion in damage. It is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord StHelens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver, who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century. The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows.

This major eruption will be the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in U.S. history. Fifty-seven people will be killed; 250 homes, 47 bridges, 15 miles of railways, and 185 miles of highway will be destroyed. A massive debris avalanche triggered by an earthquake measuring 5.1 on the Richter scale has caused an eruption that will reduce the elevation of the mountain's summit from 9,677feet to 8,363feet, leaving a 1 mile-wide horseshoe-shaped crater. The debris avalanche will be up to 0.7 cubic miles in volume. The Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument will be created to preserve the volcano and allow for the eruption's aftermath to be scientifically studied.
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:57 PM
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May 19, 1864: Nathaniel Hawthorne dies.
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Old 05-19-2019, 12:39 AM
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May 19, 1962: A 45th birthday salute to U.S. President John F. Kennedy takes place at Madison Square Garden, New York City, attended by more than 15,000 people. The highlight is Marilyn Monroe's rendition of "Happy Birthday.”

Monroe's dress is made of a sheer flesh-colored marquisette fabric, with 2,500 shimmering rhinestones sewn into it. The dress is so tight-fitting that she has difficulty putting it on; she wears nothing under it.

Monroe sings the traditional "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics in a sultry, intimate voice, with "Mr. President" inserted as Kennedy's name. She continues the song with a snippet from the classic song, "Thanks for the Memory", for which she has written new lyrics specifically aimed at Kennedy.

Thanks, Mr. President
For all the things you've done
The battles that you've won
The way you deal with U.S. Steel
And our problems by the ton
We thank you so much

Afterwards, as an enormous birthday cake is presented to him, President Kennedy comes on stage and jokes about Monroe's version of the song, saying, "I can now retire from politics after having had Happy Birthday sung to me in such a sweet, wholesome way," alluding to Marilyn's delivery, skintight dress, and image as a sex symbol.

The performance is to be one of Monroe's last major public appearances before her death less than three months later on August 5, 1962.

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  #1692  
Old 05-20-2019, 01:07 AM
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May 20, 1891: The first public display of Thomas Edison's prototype Kinetoscope, an early motion picture exhibition device. The Kinetoscope is designed for films to be viewed by one individual at a time through a peephole viewer window at the top of the device. The Kinetoscope is not a movie projector, but introduces the basic approach that will become the standard for all cinematic projection before the advent of video. It creates the illusion of movement by conveying a strip of perforated film bearing sequential images over a light source with a high-speed shutter. A process using roll film had been used by Edison in 1889, and subsequently developed by his employee William Dickson between 1889 and 1892.

The first public demonstration of a prototype Kinetoscope is given at the laboratory for approximately 150 members of the National Federation of Women's Clubs. The New York Sun will describe what the club women see in the "small pine box" they encountered:
“In the top of the box was a hole perhaps an inch in diameter. As they looked through the hole they saw the picture of a man. It was a most marvelous picture. It bowed and smiled and waved its hands and took off its hat with the most perfect naturalness and grace. Every motion was perfect….”
The man is Dickson; the little movie, approximately three seconds long, will be referred to as the Dickson Greeting.
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Old 05-21-2019, 04:49 AM
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May 21, 1936: Sada Abe is arrested after asphyxiating her lover, Kichizō Ishida, and wandering the streets of Tokyo for days with his severed genitals in her kimono. Her story soon will soon become one of Japan's most notorious scandals.

With a notorious background in prostitution, Abe had begun work as an apprentice at the Yoshidaya restaurant on February 1, 1936. The owner of this establishment, Kichizō Ishida, 42 at the time, was married. The two of them soon entered into a sexual relationship. Of Ishida, Abe later said, "It is hard to say exactly what was so good about Ishida. But it was impossible to say anything bad about his looks, his attitude, his skill as a lover, the way he expressed his feelings. I had never met such a sexy man.”

After a two-week encounter ended, Abe became agitated and began drinking excessively. She said that with Ishida she had come to know true love for the first time in her life, and the thought of Ishida being back with his wife made her intensely jealous. On the morning of May 18, 1936, as Ishida was asleep, Abe wrapped her sash twice around his neck and strangled him to death. After lying with Ishida's body for a few hours, she next severed his genitalia with a kitchen knife and and kept them until her arrest three days later.

Abe is arrested and interrogated over eight sessions. When asked why she had severed Ishida's genitalia, Abe replies, "Because I couldn't take his head or body with me. I wanted to take the part of him that brought back to me the most vivid memories.”

After her arrest, Ishida's (average-sized) penis and testicles will be moved to Tokyo University Medical School's pathology museum. They will be put on public display soon after the end of World War II, but will have since disappeared.

The story will become a national sensation in Japan, acquiring mythic overtones, and will be interpreted by artists, philosophers, novelists and filmmakers. Abe will be released after having served five years in prison and will go on to write an autobiography. She will live until 1971.
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Old 05-22-2019, 12:07 AM
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May 22, 1849: Future U.S. President Abraham Lincoln is issued a patent for an invention to lift boats, making him the only U.S. President to ever hold a patent.

Called "Buoying Vessels Over Shoals," Lincoln envisions a system of waterproof fabric bladders that could be inflated when necessary to help ease a stuck ship over obstacles. When crew members knew their ship was stuck, or at risk of hitting a shallow, Lincoln's invention could be activated, which would inflate the air chambers along the bottom of the watercraft to lift it above the water's surface, providing enough clearance to avoid a disaster. As part of the research process, Lincoln designed a scale model of a ship outfitted with the device. This model (built and assembled with the assistance of a Springfield, Ill., mechanic named Walter Davis) will be on display at the Smithsonian Institution.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:20 AM
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May 22, 1915: The Quintinshill Rail Accident in Scotland near Gretna Green kills 226 and injures 246. Errors and shift changes by the signalmen at a crossing lead to a collision between a standing train and a moving train. A third speeding passenger train then collides with the initial wreck. This is Britain's deadliest rail accident. The two signalmen were found guilty of neglect and sentenced to a year in jail. After release, both were re-employed by the railroad.
  #1696  
Old 05-23-2019, 12:48 AM
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May 23, 1934: Infamous bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are ambushed by police and killed on a rural road in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

On May 21, posse members from Texas were in Shreveport, Louisiana when they learned that Barrow and Parker were to go to Bienville Parish that evening with Frank Methvin. The full posse set up an ambush along Louisiana State Highway 154 south of Gibsland. The group was in place by 9p.m. and waited through the whole next day with no sign of the murderers.

At approximately 9:15 a.m. on May 23, the posse are still concealed in the bushes and almost ready to concede defeat, when they hear Barrow's stolen Ford V8 approaching at a high speed. Their official report has Barrow stopping to speak with Methvin's father, who has been planted there with his truck that morning to distract Barrow and force him into the lane closer to the posse. The lawmen open fire, killing Barrow and Parker while shooting about 130 rounds. Barrow is killed instantly by a head shot, Parker screams as she realizes that Barrow is dead, before the shooting begins in her direction. The officers empty all their weapons at the car.

According to statements made by two of the officers:
“Each of us six officers had a shotgun and an automatic rifle and pistols. We opened fire with the automatic rifles. They were emptied before the car got even with us. Then we used shotguns…. There was smoke coming from the car, and it looked like it was on fire. After shooting the shotguns, we emptied the pistols at the car, which had passed us and ran into a ditch about 50 yards on down the road. It almost turned over. We kept shooting at the car even after it stopped. We weren't taking any chances.”
Parish coroner Dr. J. L. Wade's 1934 report will list 17 separate entrance wounds on Barrow's body and 26 on Parker's, including several headshots on each, and one that had snapped Barrow's spinal column. Undertaker C. F. "Boots" Bailey will have difficulty embalming the bodies because of all the bullet holes.

Last edited by panache45; 05-23-2019 at 12:49 AM.
  #1697  
Old 05-24-2019, 12:38 AM
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May 24, 1883: The Brooklyn Bridge, connecting Manhattan and Brooklyn, is opened to traffic after 14 years of construction. Although technically a suspension bridge, it uses a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge design. The towers are built of limestone, granite, and Rosendale cement. The limestone was quarried at the Clark Quarry in Essex County, New York. The granite blocks were quarried and shaped on Vinalhaven Island, Maine, under a contract with the Bodwell Granite Company, and delivered from Maine to New York by schooner.

Over the years, the Brooklyn Bridge will undergo several reconfigurations; upon opening it carries horse-drawn vehicles and elevated railway lines, but in the future will carry vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle traffic. Commercial vehicles will be banned from the bridge.

The bridge was built with numerous passageways and compartments in its anchorages. New York City rented out the large vaults under the bridge's Manhattan anchorage in order to fund the bridge. The vaults were used to store wine, as they were always at 60 °F (16 °C). This was called the "Blue Grotto" because of a shrine to the Virgin Mary next to an opening at the entrance. When New York will visit one of the cellars about 102 years later, in 1978, it will discover, on the wall, a fading inscription reading: "Who loveth not wine, women and song, he remaineth a fool his whole life long.”
  #1698  
Old 05-25-2019, 02:18 AM
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May 25, 1925: John T. Scopes is indicted for teaching Charles Darwin's theory of evolution in Tennessee.

The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes, is an American legal case in July 1925 in which a substitute high school teacher, John T. Scopes, is accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which has made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school. The trial is deliberately staged in order to attract publicity to the small town of Dayton, Tennessee, where it will be held. Scopes is unsure whether he had ever actually taught evolution, but he purposely incriminates himself so that the case could have a defendant.

Scopes will be found guilty and fined $100, but the verdict will be overturned on a technicality. The trial will serve its purpose of drawing intense national publicity, as national reporters flock to Dayton to cover the big-name lawyers who had agreed to represent each side. William Jennings Bryan, three-time presidential candidate, will argue for the prosecution, while Clarence Darrow, the famed defense attorney, will speak for Scopes.

Bryan will chastise evolution for teaching children that humans were but one of 35,000 types of mammals, and bemoaned the notion that human beings were descended "Not even from American monkeys, but from old world monkeys".
  #1699  
Old 05-26-2019, 02:43 AM
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May 26, 1868: The Impeachment of President Andrew Johnson ends with his acquittal by one vote.

Impeachment procedings began on February 24, when the House of Representatives adopted eleven articles of impeachment detailing his "high crimes and misdemeanors." The House's primary charge against Johnson was violation of the Tenure of Office Act, passed by the U.S. Congress in March 1867, over the President's veto.

The House approved the articles of impeachment on March 2–3, and forwarded them to the Senate. The trial in the Senate began three days later, with Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presiding. On May 16, the Senate failed to convict Johnson on one of the articles, with the 35–19 vote in favor of conviction falling short of the necessary two-thirds majority by a single vote. A ten-day recess was called before attempting to convict him on additional articles.

The delay does not change the outcome, however, as on May 26, it fails to convict the President on two articles, both by the same margin; after which the trial is adjourned.

This is the first impeachment of a President since creation of the office in 1789. It is the culmination of a lengthy political battle between Johnson, a lifelong Democrat, and the Republican majority in Congress over how best to deal with the defeated Southern states following the conclusion of the Civil War. The impeachment and subsequent trial (and acquittal) of Johnson will be among the most dramatic events in the political life of the nation during the Reconstruction Era.
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Old 05-27-2019, 06:39 AM
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May 27, 1933: The Walt Disney Company releases the cartoon Three Little Pigs, with its hit song "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” The title characters are cast as Fifer Pig, Fiddler Pig and Practical Pig. The first two are depicted as both frivolous and arrogant. The story has been somewhat softened. The first two pigs still get their houses blown down, but escape from the wolf. Also, the wolf is not boiled to death but simply burns his behind and runs away. Three sequels will soon follow in 1934, 1936 and 1939 respectively as a result of the short's popularity.

"Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf" is written by Frank Churchill with additional lyrics by Ann Ronell, which originally features in the cartoon, where it is sung by Fiddler Pig and Fifer Pig (voiced by Mary Moder and Dorothy Compton, respectively) as they arrogantly believe their houses of straw and twigs will protect them from the Big Bad Wolf (voiced by Billy Bletcher). The song's theme will make it a huge hit during the 1930s and it will remain one of the most well-known Disney songs, being covered by numerous artists and musical groups. Additionally, it will be the inspiration for the title of Edward Albee's 1963 play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
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