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Old 04-19-2002, 01:00 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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Can you spin lint into yarn?

I have an old, small, and inefficient dryer. I was cleaning it out today when I remarked upon the huge quantity of lint built up in the THREE CYCLES it takes to get a moderate sized load dry. Anyway, I got to wondering, if I saved up all the lint for a long time, could I spin it into yarn and make a sweater out of it?

How about cat fur? I sometimes threaten my cats that I'll take all the fur they shed and knit a new cat. Could cat fur be spun into yarn?
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Old 04-19-2002, 01:39 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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Does the threat to your cats work? I'd think that they'd want a yarn kitty to play with

As to your question, I actually have no idea, but it is something I have wondered, too. Although, its always such an ugly greeny-bluey-greyish colour, I don't think I'd wear the sweater if I did have one!
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Old 04-19-2002, 01:48 PM
Weeks Weeks is offline
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no, the fibers(except the cat hair) are too short, but you can make a boiled wool felt out of it.
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Old 04-19-2002, 01:52 PM
starfish starfish is offline
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I doubt it since the fiber length is so short. Do a search on making felt (lots of web sites). Try it with your lint.
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Old 04-19-2002, 02:43 PM
Podkayne Podkayne is offline
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I've spun a pretty sad-quality yarn out of my cat's fur. The fibers are really too short, and collecting it is too hard. I don't shear the cat., of course, I just use the hair that I brush out of her fur when she's shedding. Like, now. The temperature jumps twenty degrees in one week, and that cat drops five pounds of fur. Anyway, Pooty-paws is white with black spots--an equal opportunity shedder, who can besmirch white clothing and dark upholstry with equal easy--but unlike in the Sylvester and Tweety cartoons, the yarn just turns out gray. With one brushing I can make maybe 8 inches of yarn. It's sturdy enough to knit or crochet with if you work carefully. But I'm not about to collect a bunch in a bag so that I can make more. Ick.

Pooty-paws is a short-hair--I bet if I had some fur from a long-hair I could make some serious yarn.

Lint, on the other hand, is made up of fibers that are much to short.

Oooh, I just did a Google search on "Spin pet hair" and found out I'm not nearly as freaky as I thought . . . or maybe I am, but I have a lot of company.
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Old 04-19-2002, 03:13 PM
Green Bean Green Bean is offline
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Yes, you can do it, if you mix the short fibers with longer fibers. So your yarn won't be 100% lint.

http://knitting.about.com/cs/spininfo/index.htm will take you to the first page of about.com's list of spinning webpages.

I didn't see anything on lint specifically, but it should be a good start.
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Old 04-19-2002, 03:41 PM
happyheathen happyheathen is offline
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Matt is off his meds again...
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Old 04-19-2002, 06:15 PM
voguevixen voguevixen is offline
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You can compost dryer lint, and I've heard both that you can leave it out for the birds to make nests out of, and that you can't leave it out for birds because they inhale the microscopic fibers and die. I compost mine in the summer, and use them to make firestarters in the winter. (Melt down old candle stubs and pour over lint-filled paper egg-cartons, TP tubes, or packratty equivilent.)

If your dryer is THAT inefficient, you might call your power company and see if they have any monetary incentives for you to upgrade to a new dryer (rebates, etc). Here in the states it's really encouraged, and even if they don't, you might want to figure out how much it's costing you to run three loads for every one and see how long a new dryer would pay for itself. It might be worth looking into, depending on how much your power is costing in your area.
  #9  
Old 04-20-2002, 01:04 AM
Victory Candescence Victory Candescence is offline
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It's still saner than my early childhood plan to make a cushion out of a mixture of glue and pencil shavings.
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:25 AM
longinus876 longinus876 is offline
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Yarn from dryer lint? Take some lint in your hand and pull a small bit of it to a point. Moisten your other fingers and try to twist it into a fiber the size of yarn. Now yank on it hard. If it's strong, then there's your answer. If not, then you might have done it badly. I think it can be done and would be easy. If spun tightly enough, the length of the fibers will hold. I tried it in my dryer. It worked. All lint might not be the same. Spin at your own risk.

Last edited by longinus876; 03-02-2018 at 04:27 AM.
  #11  
Old 03-02-2018, 06:53 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Podkayne View Post
I've spun a pretty sad-quality yarn out of my cat's fur. The fibers are really too short, and collecting it is too hard. I don't shear the cat., of course, I just use the hair that I brush out of her fur when she's shedding. ..

Oooh, I just did a Google search on "Spin pet hair" and found out I'm not nearly as freaky as I thought . . . or maybe I am, but I have a lot of company.
I remember many months ago this came up in my craft Group, (Dogs, though) and several People with Dogs had tried it, and found it varied greatly from breed to breed. (Reaction was also divided on whether this was a bit weird/ creepy, or useful use of material -hair- avalaible anyway when regularly brushing the dog).

As mentioned, combining hair with other good Quality yarn is possible.
  #12  
Old 03-02-2018, 07:15 AM
Jasmine Jasmine is offline
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I do know that cotton has to go through a process called "carding" to prepare it for spinning. If you had a large enough batch of lint so that you could successfully do that, then I see no reason why you couldn't move on to spinning it.

"Carding is a mechanical process that disentangles, cleans and intermixes fibers to produce a continuous web or sliver suitable for subsequent processing. This is achieved by passing the fibers between differentially moving surfaces covered with card clothing."
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  #13  
Old 03-02-2018, 09:10 AM
Inigo Montoya Inigo Montoya is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longinus876 View Post
Yarn from dryer lint? Take some lint in your hand and pull a small bit of it to a point. Moisten your other fingers and try to twist it into a fiber the size of yarn. Now yank on it hard. If it's strong, then there's your answer. If not, then you might have done it badly. I think it can be done and would be easy. If spun tightly enough, the length of the fibers will hold. I tried it in my dryer. It worked. All lint might not be the same. Spin at your own risk.
Given your extraordinary posting history I think you should petition for a new username. Perhaps "Reanimator876"?
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Old 03-02-2018, 09:48 AM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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I've thought about it, given all the cat and dog hair I pull out of the carpet. Stuff a bag and make a pillow, perhaps.
  #15  
Old 03-02-2018, 10:50 AM
DrCube DrCube is offline
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Here's a relevant book for the OP. Looks like it's mostly about how to make little felt finger puppets, but using cat hair.
  #16  
Old 03-02-2018, 11:08 AM
alice_in_wonderland alice_in_wonderland is online now
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
I remember many months ago this came up in my craft Group, (Dogs, though) and several People with Dogs had tried it, and found it varied greatly from breed to breed.
For information, if you wear said sweater in the rain or snow, you will smell like a wet dog until it fully drys.
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  #17  
Old 03-02-2018, 11:46 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Maybe not yarn, but it can be made into art.
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  #18  
Old 03-02-2018, 03:41 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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if your dryer takes a long time to dry clothes most likely the issue is the vent tube that takes air to the outside is clogged up. There are companies that specialize in cleaning those tubes.
  #19  
Old 03-02-2018, 03:57 PM
psychobunny psychobunny is offline
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Somehow, I doubt that the dryer is still working 15 years later.
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  #20  
Old 03-02-2018, 04:17 PM
watchwolf49 watchwolf49 is offline
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Here's a company that will take your cat hair, spin it and crochet a lil' cute heart out of it ... FurEverKeepsakes ... cheaper than a taxidermist ...
  #21  
Old 03-02-2018, 04:21 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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I never had any luck getting birds to use dryer fuzz for nesting, even when I put it right next to the bird houses. It's not that they're picky; I've seen them use strips of clear plastic, woven in with the grass.
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  #22  
Old 03-02-2018, 05:36 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Podkayne View Post
I don't shear the cat., of course, I just use the hair that I brush out of her fur when she's shedding. Like, now. The temperature jumps twenty degrees in one week, and that cat drops five pounds of fur.
Actually, shedding in cats is triggered by changes in the amount of sunlight reaching the earth. So while they do some shedding all the time, the majority of it happens when seasons change, in spring or fall.

Temperature doesn't really have much to do with it*, especially as most cats live indoors, at roughly room temp all year round.

But dryer lint works better as stuffing, like for a pillow, or stuffing inside a quilt, than spun into yarn. And it tens to pack down, not stay fluffy. The commercial stuffing is more consistent & easier to work with, and a lot less work to obtain.

*Except that average outside temperature changes with the seasons, too. But it's the light, not the temperature, tha is the trigger.

Last edited by t-bonham@scc.net; 03-02-2018 at 05:39 PM.
  #23  
Old 03-02-2018, 05:40 PM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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I met a couple a few years back and they were saving the undercoat from their 2 massive Newfies to knit sweaters for their infants. I don't know how that turned out. I'll have to find out.
  #24  
Old 03-02-2018, 08:38 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Dryer lint also makes an excellent tinder, for starting campfires. It's the only material I've ever seen anyone successfully light using flint and steel. I'm sure there are other materials that are even better, but they're not as readily available.
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Old 03-03-2018, 09:32 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by alice_in_wonderland View Post
For information, if you wear said sweater in the rain or snow, you will smell like a wet dog until it fully drys.
If you have natural sheep wool - that is, with the fat still on it, so it slightly repels water and regenerates with fresh air - it will always smell more or less strong with lanolin (wool fat).
  #26  
Old 03-03-2018, 09:34 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by Jasmine View Post
I do know that cotton has to go through a process called "carding" to prepare it for spinning. If you had a large enough batch of lint so that you could successfully do that, then I see no reason why you couldn't move on to spinning it.
Carding is done not only for cotton, but mostly for wool, to bring the fibres into one direction and pull out dirt, foreign bodies and too short fibers.

You still need either the right consistency - like wool, which "hooks" into each other - or a minimum length, or both.

Since dryer lint is mostly short fibers, I would recommend felting or pictures and similar.
  #27  
Old 03-03-2018, 09:35 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
I never had any luck getting birds to use dryer fuzz for nesting, even when I put it right next to the bird houses. It's not that they're picky; I've seen them use strips of clear plastic, woven in with the grass.
Does the dryer lint smell after chemicals you use during washing/ drying? (Anti-static sheet)?
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