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Old 11-16-2002, 02:44 AM
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Your Favorite "Time Travel" Novel?


With me I guess it all started with The Time Machine and then evolved (de-volved?) from there.

I loved the film Somewhere In Time, and it is one of my most prized videos, but I digress.....

I'm being a bit selfish, here, but what I really want y'all to do is to recommend some time travel stories I might not have read yet.

I am especially fond of the ones that take the reader to 18th or 19th century New York or London.

And I love references to the Flatiron Building!


Quasi
  #2  
Old 11-16-2002, 02:56 AM
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Millennium by John Varley. I need to dig my copy out again and re-read it. It's absolutely amazing. Check out the chapter titles...
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Old 11-16-2002, 05:10 AM
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The End of Eternity (I think that's the title) by Isaac Asimov
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Old 11-16-2002, 05:28 AM
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The Heinlein people need to help me out on this one.

A short story, Somewhere In Time (???) A professor had his students listen to some sort of recording and they vanished into some sort of alternate universe/ other time. One student became an angel, a couple became some sort of ultra-future queen and king warriors....

Not really time travel per se, but still a fascinating story.

Plot twist spoiled on next one:

There was also another one, title a complete blank, where a "time viewer," "chronoscope" was invented
SPOILER:
and lied about, because it didn't allow viewing distant past, but only recent past. However, it allowed a viewer to see anywhere. Setting it at say, one second in the past, allowed a viewer to spy on anyone in almost real time, thus ending forever any sort of privacy.


I would love to reread either of these stories, if I could just find the real titles. So, Heinlein experts... ideas?

Not really a hijack. These are great time travel type stories that you might enjoy, Quasi.

RIF!
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Old 11-16-2002, 08:12 AM
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It's out of print, but if you can find it, I highly recommend The Ivanhoe Gambit by Simon Hawke. It's the first book in the "Time Wars Adventure Series" which was up to 8 or 9 books I think, before Hawke quit writing them. I quit reading them after about the third or four book since
SPOILER:
he killed Lucas Priest who was the main character up until that point.
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Old 11-16-2002, 09:03 AM
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Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon.

A romance time travel story.

Trust me.
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Old 11-16-2002, 09:16 AM
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Jack Finney is the man for you. Time and Again is about a man who goes back to NYC in the 1880s, and has the added bonus of being illustrated with nifty period reproductions. Finney does a great job of combining the mystery plot elements with fascinating little tidbts about the differences in day-to-day life that surprise the time traveller. The sequel, From Time to Time is also pretty decent, although the plot is a little more stereotypical.

My favorite though is his book of short stories, About Time. Most of the stories are witty and light, a few are insightful, one of them was heartbreaking.
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Old 11-16-2002, 09:38 AM
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Can't believe no one has mentioned:

"A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court"


All time best time travel novel.

IMHO.

D.
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Old 11-16-2002, 09:54 AM
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Another vote for Time and Again.

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Old 11-16-2002, 10:32 AM
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I'm partial to Octavia Butler's book Kindred. It's about a modern black woman who finds herself whisked back to slaveholding times. Very good read & very thought provoking.
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Old 11-16-2002, 10:41 AM
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I'd have to say my favorite is Connecticut Yankee, though Stephen Fry's Making History wasn't bad, it just had a bad ending.
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Old 11-16-2002, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by ivylass
Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon.

A romance time travel story.

Trust me.
Oh yeah!! I second that!

I cannot recommend Outlander, or the entire Outlander series for that matter, highly enough.
Amazing books.

You also might want to check out The Doomsday Book, by Connie Willis.
Time-travel in the time of the plague.
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Old 11-16-2002, 10:53 AM
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I just recently finished Pastwatch: The redemption of Christopher Columbus by Orson Scott Card. It was an interesting read.

One thing about the Outlander series - they are definitely written from a woman's point of view. I enjoyed them, but I can only think of one male friend who did.
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Old 11-16-2002, 10:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by NoClueBoy
The Heinlein people need to help me out on this one.

A short story, Somewhere In Time (???) A professor had his students listen to some sort of recording and they vanished into some sort of alternate universe/ other time. One student became an angel, a couple became some sort of ultra-future queen and king warriors....
"Elsewhen" which can be found inthe collection Assignment in Eternity. It's a fun llittle story, but for Heinlein's two best time travel stories, try "By His Bootstraps" and "All You Zombies". One can be found in The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathon Hoag and the other...erm...in one of his other collections (The Menace from Earth?)

Quote:
Plot twist spoiled on next one:

There was also another one, title a complete blank, where a "time viewer," "chronoscope" was invented
SPOILER:
and lied about, because it didn't allow viewing distant past, but only recent past. However, it allowed a viewer to see anywhere. Setting it at say, one second in the past, allowed a viewer to spy on anyone in almost real time, thus ending forever any sort of privacy.
It's not Heinlein, it's Asimov: "The Dead Past" available in a billion collections (and the last line is NOT "Happy Goldfish Bowl" or "Welcome to the Goldfish Bowl.". But everyone misremembers, 'cause it should be.


Laumer's Dinosaur Beach is another classic of time travel.

Fenris
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Old 11-16-2002, 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by Fenris
(and the last line is NOT "Happy Goldfish Bowl" or "Welcome to the Goldfish Bowl.". But everyone misremembers, 'cause it should be.
[/B]
(Erm...but it's awful damned close. I have no idea what I was thinking when I typed that.)
  #16  
Old 11-16-2002, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Greywolf73


You also might want to check out The Doomsday Book, by Connie Willis.
Time-travel in the time of the plague.
And, for a funnier Connie Willis time travel story in the same "world", read "To Say Nothing of the Dog".
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Old 11-16-2002, 11:22 AM
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Another vote for Jack Finney's books. His are some of the few books that I keep after reading.
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Old 11-16-2002, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by NoClueBoy
There was also another one, title a complete blank, where a "time viewer," "chronoscope" was invented

RIF!
That sounds like THE LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS

The Light of Other Days by Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter.

I liked Tim Powers' The Anubis Gates, especially the code for identifying other time travellers in 18th centruy England (whistling McCartney's "Yesterday".)
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Old 11-16-2002, 11:24 AM
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Fenris is, of course, correct. Heinlein's "By His Bootstraps" and "All You Zombies" are required reading.

I also love his "The Door Into Summer" - another time travel paradoxer, this time a full novel (the other two are Novellas?". It was written when RAH was at the peak of his storytelling powers.

Great Stuff!
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Old 11-16-2002, 11:57 AM
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Thanks Fenris, those are they.

Another vote for Orson Scott Card's Pastwatch: The Redemption Of Christopher Columbus a very unique take on time paradoxes (paradi?)
  #21  
Old 11-16-2002, 12:26 PM
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I second Mark Twan's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, follwed very close behind by L. Sprgue de Cmp's classic Lest Darkness Fall, arguabl th best of its kind ver. It as recently been republished with David Drake's To Bring the Light, which has the distinxcion of being the only time travel story I know of where someone from he past (circa 400 AD) gets sent even further into the past.

I also recomens Robert Silverburg's Up the Line, which delves into Time Travel into the Byzantine Empire, James Hogan's The Proteus Project, and Leo Frankowski's novels. Robert L Forward's Time Master is a time-travel novelk by a physicist who has looked into time travel. Also a guarded note about Michael Crichton's Timeline.
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Old 11-16-2002, 12:47 PM
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I think the two Heinlein pieces are no longer than short stories. A novella has to be at least 15,000 words long.

One of the best recent time travel novels is John Kessel's Corrupting Dr. Nice. The first section takes place in 1st century Jerusalem and layers modern time travelers over the lives of those who really lived there at that time and also over the lives of those who work for the time travel business and have been co-opted and corrupted by future ways. It's as good an illustration of what time travel would do to a culture as anything in sf.

The rest of the book doesn't quite live up to that, but there are a number of fun scenes concerning an apatosaur brought as a pet to suburban Connecticut.
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Old 11-16-2002, 12:56 PM
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Nobody mentioned The Dancers at the End of Time by Michael Moorcock. I have to go re-read it every couple of years. Time travel isn't really a big part of the events of the plot, but did set up the situation.

And don't forget The Big Time by Fritz Leiber.

I'll of course second Connecticut Yankee and The Time Machine. (That last scene on the beach still shakes me up.)

Both of those Connie Willis books are great too. I just started To Say Nothing of the Dog, and would suggest the (non-time-travel) Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome if you like the boating scenes. Yes, that's a spoiler!
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Old 11-16-2002, 01:21 PM
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If I Never Get Back by Daryl Brock which is about a guy who travels back to the 1890's and end up playing with the Cinncinatti Reds of that time period and meets Samuel Clemens.

Very entertaining so rush on out and get it at your local bookstore or library.
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Old 11-16-2002, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tuckerfan
It's out of print, but if you can find it, I highly recommend The Ivanhoe Gambit by Simon Hawke. It's the first book in the "Time Wars Adventure Series" which was up to 8 or 9 books I think, before Hawke quit writing them. I quit reading them after about the third or four book since
SPOILER:
he killed Lucas Priest who was the main character up until that point.
It ended up at 12 novels. A fun read and you might really want to go and find the later books if that is the only reason you dropped the series and you were enjoying it up until then. Remember, we are talking time travel here.
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Old 11-16-2002, 03:42 PM
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I'd vote fro The Time Ships by Steven Baxter. It's a re-write of The Time Machine but with modern physics thrown in.
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Old 11-16-2002, 05:19 PM
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Didn't Ray Bradbury write a short story about an exhibit where you went back in time and were supposed stay within a certain path but some dude stepped on a bug (Butterfly?) and when he went back the alphabet was different? Isn't that where butterfly effect came from? I can't remember the story.
  #28  
Old 11-16-2002, 05:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tapioca Dextrin
I'd vote fro The Time Ships by Steven Baxter. It's a re-write of The Time Machine but with modern physics thrown in.
Not entirely true. It's a sequel to the Time Machine by Stephen Baxter. It was reasonably good on it's own, but it didn't follow well from the Time Machine - the perspectives in the two are so different that it detracts a lot from the Time Ships IMO.

I'll add yet another vote for 'To Say Nothing of the Dog'
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Old 11-16-2002, 05:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by KidCharlemagne
Didn't Ray Bradbury write a short story about an exhibit where you went back in time and were supposed stay within a certain path but some dude stepped on a bug (Butterfly?) and when he went back the alphabet was different? Isn't that where butterfly effect came from? I can't remember the story.
Yes. The men were going back in time to kill dinosaurs who were very close to death anyway. That way the time line wouldn't be contaminated

While they were shooting at a T-Rex who was about to have a tree fall on top of him, one of the hunters stepped on a butterfly.

They go back to the present, find the language has changed and a dictator has taken over.

As punishment, they sent the hunter back in time to the dinosaur age.

I can't remember the title either.
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Old 11-16-2002, 06:04 PM
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The Ray Bradbury story is The Sund of Thunder. I think that L. Sprague de Camp wrote the similarly-themed A Gun for Dinosaur because he didn't lik the way Bradbury andled time travel. Much, much later, de Camp wrote more stories using the same characters and published it as a book, Rivers of Time.
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Old 11-16-2002, 06:33 PM
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Lynn Bodoni answers one of my posts.

I need a little time (!) to let that one settle.

I am honored, Lynn.
I'll get a copy of Millennium ASAP!

I also appreciate the list y'all provided, and I must say I'm looking forward to many winter nights curled up in bed and taking a trip backward in time!

Also looking forward to my re-read of Connecticut Yankee....!
Thanks for the reminder!

Quasi
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Old 11-16-2002, 06:56 PM
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Another good O.S. Card novel with a really different take on time-travel is Enchantment. It's more fantasy than sci-fi, though.
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Old 11-16-2002, 07:16 PM
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In addition to time travel stories I like alternate history stories. You know, what if something had happened differently, how would it affect history? My favorite author of this type of story was H. Beam Piper, who died over forty years ago. His Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen was booklength, most of the rest were short stories or novellas. The best short story was "He Walked Around the Horses." It was based on the Charles Fort story about the British diplomat who disappeared in Germany early in the nineteenth century. If you know your history, the last line of the story will be very funny/ironic. Go and find it if you can.
Anybody else like Piper?
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Old 11-16-2002, 07:27 PM
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Old 11-16-2002, 07:35 PM
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Here's an obscure one I liked: Elleander Morning by some guy whose last name begins with a "Z" (my books aren't yet unpacked after my recent move so I can't double-check). It's not a scienc-ey time travel book -- more of a fantasy, I guess, and mixed with a lot of alternative history. Basically the woman in the title goes back in time to kill Hitler and stop WWII. But it's a whole lot more complicated than that. The modern scenes set in a world where WWII didn't take place are particularly interesting. Very good read.

Jess
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Old 11-16-2002, 08:13 PM
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Guns of the South, by Harry Turtledove. Even the cover alone catches the eye ; Robert E Lee holding an Ak47.
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Old 11-16-2002, 08:16 PM
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No mention of Kevin Grimwood's Replay? That's kind of surprising. Although it may not be technically considered a time travel story in that the main character didn't really have control over the time travel element in the story.

The aforementioned Pastwatch, Time and Again, From Time to Time, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court are all great reads as well.
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Old 11-16-2002, 08:41 PM
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More props to Beam Piper. Hell, I once fronted a band called The Beam Pipers.

And also to Turtledoves GotS.

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Old 11-16-2002, 09:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by delphica
Jack Finney is the man for you. Time and Again is about a man who goes back to NYC in the 1880s, and has the added bonus of being illustrated with nifty period reproductions. Finney does a great job of combining the mystery plot elements with fascinating little tidbts about the differences in day-to-day life that surprise the time traveller. The sequel, From Time to Time is also pretty decent, although the plot is a little more stereotypical.
I'd also recommended his book of non-fiction "Forgotten News," in which he discusses things he picked up while doing research for Time and Again. Half of the book is about a notorious "Crime of the Century" that was played out in the pages of the newspapers of the day. He actually managed to find the house the murder took place in, looking remarkably the same considering it took place about 150 years before.
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Old 11-16-2002, 09:54 PM
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Lightning, by Dean Koontz. A woman's "guardian angel" is actually a time traveler who is in love with her.
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Old 11-16-2002, 11:59 PM
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lightning is a good choice.

I'd nominate Heinlein's Time Enough For Love. I mean, you didn't specify which direction they had to travel in...

How about David Gerrold's The Man Who Folded Himself?

And the two Heinlein stories mentioned are among the best, but they are both short stories.
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Old 11-17-2002, 12:01 AM
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I actually meant to say Time For The Stars, not Time Enough For Love.
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Old 11-17-2002, 12:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by WSLer
If I Never Get Back by Daryl Brock which is about a guy who travels back to the 1890's and end up playing with the Cinncinatti Reds of that time period and meets Samuel Clemens.

Very entertaining so rush on out and get it at your local bookstore or library.
Good book! Keep an eye out for the scene where the guy gets really board with the food of the time. He comes up with a creative solution.

I second the votes for Connie Willis' The Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog -- also the 1st story about the Oxford time travelers, Time Watch, to be found in the collection Time Watch & other Stories.
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Old 11-17-2002, 12:29 AM
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Re Heinlein, I think "All you Zombies" was a short story, but I remember "By his Bootstraps" as being longer. It might have been a novelette.

How about Kage Baker's books?

And "Timescape". Can't remember who wrote it.
  #45  
Old 11-17-2002, 02:58 AM
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I"m just glad I mentioned Connecticut Yankee in a straight dope thread.. I can die happy now!

Sir Boss jousting with a colt peacemaker in his hand... CLASSIC!

D.
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Old 11-17-2002, 04:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lok

It ended up at 12 novels. A fun read and you might really want to go and find the later books if that is the only reason you dropped the series and you were enjoying it up until then. Remember, we are talking time travel here.
I picked up one of the later ones, I think it was 7, anyway, it involved the Colosseus of Rhodes and Jules Verne and I wasn't impressed. It seemed a little "cutesy" to me and just didn't have the biting edge that the first one had.
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Old 11-17-2002, 05:37 AM
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Readers who like Finney, Willis or Gabaldon would perhaps enjoy

Time Out of Mind by John Maxim.

It is a combination thriller, romance and ghost story, with, of course, plenty of time travel--19th century New York City.
  #48  
Old 11-17-2002, 08:12 AM
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Oh yeah!! I second that!

I cannot recommend Outlander, or the entire Outlander series for that matter, highly enough.
Amazing books.
Make that a third very strong recommendation. Outlander is NOT your typical romance novel. In fact, although there is a "love story" in it, it should *not* be classified in romance. It's Historical Fiction. And damned good fiction at that. Outlander is my favourite book ever and I read it at least once a year.

The first two are set in Scotland and France during the time of the second Jacobite uprising. The third, let's just say deals with aftermath. The forth and fifth (and eventually 6th and 7th) will be dealing with the American Revolution.

Stop whatever you're doing and go NOW and buy Outlander. Then e-mail me (mauvaise3@cox.net) after you've finished and thank me
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Old 11-17-2002, 11:19 AM
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I've always liked Andre Norton's time travel books, her "Time Traders" series (The Time Traders, Galactic Derelict, The Defiant Agents and Key Out of Time) as well as the unrelated Operation: Time Search.

I'll also second Simon Hawke's Time Wars series; not deep but good fun anyway.

I'll also mention The End of Eternity by Asimov and The Fall of Chronopolis by Barrington J. Bailey.
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Old 11-17-2002, 11:24 AM
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Bah, you folks speak ill of romance novels.

For those of you not afraid of shlock: A Knight in Shining Armour by Jude Devereaux.

Michael Crichton's Time Line I found very good. (But, then again, I primarily read romance, so I was raising my standards that day...)
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