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Old 08-29-2004, 05:12 PM
Ultraviolet Ultraviolet is offline
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Parking the hard drive when moving a computer

I seem to remember years ago when doing Computer Science in high school, we were told that it was necessary to "park the hard drive" before physically moving the CPU. Is this still necessary with today's computers? I'm moving soon and want to know if I must do this.
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Old 08-29-2004, 05:16 PM
Berkut Berkut is offline
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Modern drives park themselves when powered down. Don't worry about it.
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Old 08-29-2004, 06:18 PM
Q.E.D. Q.E.D. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berkut
Modern drives park themselves when powered down. Don't worry about it.
Yep. I dropped one down the stairs (highly not recommended), and it actually survived and passed a surface scan with flying colors.
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Old 08-29-2004, 06:44 PM
Torpor Beast Torpor Beast is offline
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It's funny how park.com and park.exe seem to spread among CS teachers. Kind of like a virus.
I remember having to park the MFM disks in our CS classroom in the late eighties/early nineties, but even then I had a Quantum SCSI disk with auto parking heads sitting at home.
AFAIK manual parking of HD heads died when the IDE standard appeared.
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Old 08-29-2004, 07:21 PM
Ultraviolet Ultraviolet is offline
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Thanks, guys! I thought it wasn't necessary, but better safe than sorry.
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Old 08-29-2004, 07:38 PM
beltbuckle beltbuckle is offline
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haha. same experience here. My junior high technology teacher made sure we parked the heads before each shutdown, even. These were 286's, and the drives already were parking themselves at this time.

You can hear the heads park if you listen closely, when you shut your computer down your drive makes one last clicky sound.
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Old 08-30-2004, 10:05 AM
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ftg ftg is offline
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There are two kinds of parking. The old-fashioned kind used for safely shutting down the drive and a "harder" park for when you want to ship the drive. The former has been done automatically for years. (Note that the earliest IDE drives were not self-parking.) As to the former, most of what I know about it comes from the "extra utilities" menu on drive makers' set-up disks. I don't know if current IDE drives still need them, but it was still a useful option in the quite recent past.

So, Ultraviolet, get the set-up disk for your particular drive. (You can get the latest version from the maker's web site.) See if it has a park option for your drive. It it does, use it. Can't hurt, might help.
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Old 08-30-2004, 11:30 AM
Torpor Beast Torpor Beast is offline
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Seriously, there's no reason to use parking utilities if your drive is less than 10 years old.
All modern harddisks pull their heads mechanically to the landing zone used for parking. Even if you pull the power plug in the middle of a read.

This site has some more info:

http://www.storagereview.com/guide20...ctParking.html
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