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Old 02-19-2009, 08:51 PM
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Synesthesia


Are there any other synesthetes here? What types do you have?

I have colors for a whole range of things- letters, numbers, music, concepts, some smells, some pain, and a little taste.
I also have spatial positions for concepts, usually in the wrong place. For instance, I see "left" as being on the right, and "right" as being on the left. Same thing for conservatives/Republicans and liberals/Democrats- respectively over my left and right shoulders. This is why, at age 19, I still can't tell left from right with any certainty.
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:09 PM
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There are some here, occasionally there will be a post on smelling numbers or tasting colors etc..etc.. All very interesting but so incredibly rare it's tough to get a group of synesthetics together to actually have a chat.

Oh and Welcome to the boards.
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:21 PM
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All very interesting but so incredibly rare it's tough to get a group of synesthetics together to actually have a chat.
Not so difficult; the first message board I ever signed up for is for synnies.
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Old 02-19-2009, 09:33 PM
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Question for any who want to chime in: at what age did you figure out that few other people shared your gift? Like all kids you probably assumed that what you experienced everybody else did, right?
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Old 02-19-2009, 10:22 PM
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Question for any who want to chime in: at what age did you figure out that few other people shared your gift? Like all kids you probably assumed that what you experienced everybody else did, right?
I just pretty much took it for granted until I was an adult, and discovered there was a name for it.

I associate colors with letters, numbers, typefaces and music. I don't literally see the colors though, like some people. It's more like looking at a black-and-white photo, and you just know the grass is green and the house is red.

But music gets very strange. The notes have different colors, as do keys. And it's all affected by instrumentation, tempo and dynamics. That's why I can get just totally absorbed in some instrumental music; lyrics can be a distraction.
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:11 PM
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Question for any who want to chime in: at what age did you figure out that few other people shared your gift? Like all kids you probably assumed that what you experienced everybody else did, right?
Early 20s. And no, I assumed that there was something strange about me, not that everyone experienced the same thing. No one ever said anything about it, so I had no reason to believe it was common.

I'm sound → color, of the variety wiki refers to as "broad band."
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:33 PM
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Most people throw out the center of a head of lettuce, or the middle of a bunch of celery. I like that sweet yellow flavor, but I don't think that's synesthesia. I met a pregnant woman who had developed it during her pregnancy. She thought it was interesting, but she hoped it went away with childbirth. I lost touch with her, and I don't know if it did.
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:55 PM
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I just pretty much took it for granted until I was an adult, and discovered there was a name for it.
Same here, which is unfortunate since recognizing it earlier in life could have greatly helped my speech therapy.

My hearing was checked out at an early age because of my problems with language, and instead of learning certain sounds through osmosis like most kids, I had to learn them through rote memorization. They simply, in my world, didn't exist. I literally could not hear the difference between the words run and won. As an adult, I manage most of my verbal communication by brute force and still miss the meaning about half the time when someone says something to me. People probably think I'm either Deaf or stoned with how often I ask them to repeat themselves. The words enter my ears just fine, but in my head they become...something else. Sensations, mostly. Warm, cool, a scent, that particular feeling of sandy feet on a California beach in June, etc.

The personification of certain concepts is particularly interesting, though. Different seasons, days of the week, and numbers have personalities to me. When certain numbers come up, I feel like I'm getting a visit from an old friend.
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Old 02-20-2009, 01:49 AM
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I was aware that other people didn't taste things in color or shape when I was little. I learned to keep those things to myself. I always associated colors with numbers, shapes, days of the week, feelings, etc. For me everything I eat has a color and shape associated with it. It is really hard for me to describe "how did it taste" to someone else because "slightly blue and very round" doesn't mean anything to them.

I was in my late 20's when I hear a story on synesthesia on NPR. I was really excited to find out other people like me existed and that it had a name.
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Old 02-20-2009, 03:30 AM
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I don't know if this what you are talking about, but I hear songs in color. Not all songs, but there are a lot.
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Old 02-20-2009, 03:44 AM
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Same here, which is unfortunate since recognizing it earlier in life could have greatly helped my speech therapy.

My hearing was checked out at an early age because of my problems with language, and instead of learning certain sounds through osmosis like most kids, I had to learn them through rote memorization.
I wonder if you would talk about this a little for me. We can take it to pm if you would prefer but here's the reason I ask: my eldest child has a language disorder which has not really been diagnosed yet, despite his having been regularly tested and so on since the age of 3. (He is now 9) At this moment they have settled on calling it a language disorder with features of auditory processing disorder. An acquaintance of mine hs long insisted that he is clearly synesthetic and that this is part of his problem with language.

He might be; certainly his storytelling is rife with synesthesia, the literary device.

However, I cannot find anything anywhere which associates synesthesia with language problems -- except where both are secondary to an autism spectrum disorder, then it's tossed in as a side note but not really laid out anywhere. And I find it puzzling that -- if there is some link -- not a single one of the very (very) many professionals who have seen, talked to, tested and otherwise observed my kid brought it up even once. Nearly every other damn thing under the sun has been brought up after all.

I first heard the word synesthesia as a neurological condition as opposed to a literary device at the age of 41 (from that same acquantance actually) and was astounded to discover that my experience was not universal. I honestly never thought about it even once as far as I can remember, though I still think on some level that people are just kidding when they say they don't experience it, or maybe that they don't really know what I mean and if they did they would say "oh, yeah, that. Sure, everybody does that."

Anyway if you could expand on the language connection I would be most grateful.

Last edited by Marienee; 02-20-2009 at 03:44 AM.
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Old 02-20-2009, 04:43 AM
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My mother was cooing over the new word, when I (thanks to this board) was able to put a name on something one of my brothers does.

He has a blue pain (dark electric blue) on his side, sometimes, not to be mistaken with the out-of-air pain you get when you exercise hard and wrong (this one is a rust red); other tactile sensations are other colors.

Both that brother and me have some "laterality issues" as well, but I'd never thought that my problem remembering what the heck "this side" is called could be linked to anything except brainfarts
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Old 02-20-2009, 05:09 AM
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Old 02-20-2009, 10:12 AM
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I've got the most common colored letters and numbers variety. I never thought of this as odd, and it's not the sort of thing that comes up in conversation, so I thought everyone assigned colors to letters and numbers. (numbers also have personalities and genders to me, but I'm not sure that's related)

A coworker was talking about synesthesia recently and was surprised I have it. He thought it would make life more interesting, but I don't think it is. It's just the way I'm wired. Most people know the letter "S" has two curvy parts. I happen to also know that it is red. *shrug*

It did come into play when I was naming my kids. Not only did the first names have to sound good with the last name, they also could not clash. (to me, words take on a generalized color based on the colors and prominence of their constituent letters)
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Old 02-20-2009, 10:33 AM
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I have the minor, and ISTM fairly common, one - numbers have a shape and a colour to them. I remember being surprised the first time I spoke to someone who didn't have this, but then again it doesn't come up in conversation all that often. I also have the colour - pain link, and some frequencies of sound, particulalry if they're loud, have colour too.

My strongest is what that wikipedia article calls spatial sequence; I have a very strong spatial understanding of time: days of the week, months of the year and so on. It's hard to represent in two dimensions, but it's very strong. Sometimes I try to force myself to think of it in a different way, but it's a real strain. (And until this very moment, I didn't know that this was a form of synasthesia, huh).
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Old 02-20-2009, 10:40 AM
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For me everything I eat has a color and shape associated with it. It is really hard for me to describe "how did it taste" to someone else because "slightly blue and very round" doesn't mean anything to them.
Huh, that's how I experience scent. I wonder if I have this ability...

Right now, I'm wearing a perfume that smells like a flat board with a green ball on top. I have another perfume that smells like a downward slope going away from me, and another that smells bright gold, like light hitting a gold ornament. My friends would roll their eyes at me if I told them this, as though I were making it up or deliberately being weird.

Do people do this with time/concepts, too? To me, a year is shaped like an oval, and I'm standing in the middle of it facing in different directions. If I think of November, I'm facing North and it's in the 10:00 position, but if I think of July, I'm facing South and it's in the 6:00 position (12:00 to my perspective).
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Old 02-20-2009, 11:03 AM
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Numbers are shapes to me. They have been since I was very young, and I'd like to credit some of my ease of learning and using mathematics to the fact that I can see how they 'fit together'.
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Old 02-20-2009, 11:31 AM
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Do people do this with time/concepts, too? To me, a year is shaped like an oval, and I'm standing in the middle of it facing in different directions. If I think of November, I'm facing North and it's in the 10:00 position, but if I think of July, I'm facing South and it's in the 6:00 position (12:00 to my perspective).

Yep, that's clasic concept synesthesia.
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Old 02-20-2009, 12:14 PM
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Sounds have light and color values. I've always had it to a certain extent. It got a lot more pronounced when I was on SSRIs, mood-stabilizers, and anti-psychotics. I am no longer on any kind of medication, but it hasn't abated to its previous levels.

Any noise except speech has a light/color value. Often shifting as the noise shifts. I don't know why speech doesn't. It never has.

It gets worse if I'm about to have a migraine (fortunately, I don't get them often--I'm more likely to get the pre-symptom/aura stuff, and then nothing). I can't listen to music then, either, if it contains more than one instrument. The parts separate out, and I'm just left with clashing noise.

I cannot sleep with music because of this.
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Old 02-20-2009, 12:31 PM
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I wonder if you would talk about this a little for me. We can take it to pm if you would prefer but here's the reason I ask: my eldest child has a language disorder which has not really been diagnosed yet, despite his having been regularly tested and so on since the age of 3. (He is now 9) At this moment they have settled on calling it a language disorder with features of auditory processing disorder. An acquaintance of mine hs long insisted that he is clearly synesthetic and that this is part of his problem with language.

He might be; certainly his storytelling is rife with synesthesia, the literary device.

However, I cannot find anything anywhere which associates synesthesia with language problems -- except where both are secondary to an autism spectrum disorder, then it's tossed in as a side note but not really laid out anywhere. And I find it puzzling that -- if there is some link -- not a single one of the very (very) many professionals who have seen, talked to, tested and otherwise observed my kid brought it up even once. Nearly every other damn thing under the sun has been brought up after all.

I first heard the word synesthesia as a neurological condition as opposed to a literary device at the age of 41 (from that same acquantance actually) and was astounded to discover that my experience was not universal. I honestly never thought about it even once as far as I can remember, though I still think on some level that people are just kidding when they say they don't experience it, or maybe that they don't really know what I mean and if they did they would say "oh, yeah, that. Sure, everybody does that."

Anyway if you could expand on the language connection I would be most grateful.
My diagnosis was APD as well and I imagine speech therapy would have been assisted if the synesthesia had been recognized early on. Even if I couldn't understand the meaning of words, I could understand what they felt like, for example. Since I'm able to speak clearly and understand what people say about 50% of the time (which means that the other 50% I have to ask them to speak again, slowly, while looking very confused...as I said, a lot of people assume I'm Deaf or stoned) and lack insurance, I haven't had any further therapy since elementary school.* In my own experience, it's a sort of audio dyslexia. I hear the sounds just fine, but they aren't words to me. Sometimes, I can even repeat what was just said to me without understanding it. When I have difficulty with my own speech, I may switch the order of words oddly (as an example, yesterday I was telling my coworkers that they had worked really hard and it turned into, "You're working guys hard!") or replace vowel sounds or drop Rs, but luckily that's not terribly common these days.

The only link between the two that I'm aware of is Asperger Syndrome or ASD like you mention, but while it's possible I could have traits of those...it seems very unlikely. In addition to personifying sequences ("6 multiplied by 7" is a sweet sentence that always makes me feel loved), I also personify all sorts of things and worry excessively about the feelings of others. My excess of empathy makes me being an Aspy very, very unlikely.

I wish I knew more of what might connect the two, but sadly, I don't and can only offer my own experiences. There doesn't appear to be much research on a connection between the two outside of them often occurring together in certain individuals.

* I will say one nice thing was that the school district still had me coming in for speech therapy even after I was homeschooled. Once I was able to mimic the sounds I was missing that ended, though, and so further therapy wasn't forthcoming. Since there wasn't much that could be done for APD in the long run, I suppose I can see why resources weren't wasted towards that.
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Old 02-20-2009, 12:45 PM
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It's just the way I'm wired. Most people know the letter "S" has two curvy parts. I happen to also know that it is red. *shrug*
Don't be silly. S is blue. Everybody knows that!

Another color-grapheme synesthete checking in. I've had this all my life, but didn't know it had a name until I got out of college and saw an article about it in the newspaper (which I was working for at the time, so I read all the little articles buried in the back pages). I love synesthesia and wouldn't give it up--for one thing, it makes me a fantastic speller. Once I learn a word, I don't misspell it because forever after it will "look" wrong. (Typos are another matter, of course!) It's also made me a decent editor for the same reason. Misspelled words just jump out at me.

I'm married to another synesthete--he sees colors and patterns for sounds, and talks about the color of people's voices or the video he sees in his head when he hears music. I'm kind of jealous--that seems like much more fun than seeing letters in color. But at least we understand each other when I tell him his name is green and he tells me he doesn't like a particular song because it's muddy gray with jarring purple spikes.
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Old 02-20-2009, 12:49 PM
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I wish I knew more of what might connect the two, but sadly, I don't and can only offer my own experiences. There doesn't appear to be much research on a connection between the two outside of them often occurring together in certain individuals..
Well, thank you for that, if only for the affirmation. What you mention is exactly the problem with Eldest -- He often looks like a person with ASD, so he starts with that diagnosis. Then after a while it appears that, well, he is hugely empathetic, quite social with and well liked by children (though he has trouble with adults very often), gets most of his language comprehension from nonverbal signals, and has an ordinary if very intense imaginary life. So then the diagnosis is reviewed and changed again. And again. I am hoping we can just stick with APD for a while as it seems that approaching it from that angle gets the best results so far.

He describes his experience as "a stutter in my head, sometimes coming in and sometimes going out". (One of his friends has a stutter). He also switches word order but this has always been chalked up to his bilingualism -- the word order in Dutch is not the same as in English and results very often in the kinds of reversals you mention.

The school he now attends is a speech/language school, which was originally a school for the deaf and a lot of the approaches they use were indeed designed for teaching deaf or partially deaf children. He has a thingie they put in his ear and the teacher has a microphone around her neck, so the sound comes in right in his ear (but not loud) , which seems to help him to focus on/get meaning from the spoken word. Not unlike having someone speak softly in your ear.

I don't suppose you invented a language as a young child? If so I shall be forced to name you his much older twin, lol.
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Old 02-20-2009, 01:04 PM
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Marienee, you're welcome. It's actually a bit of a relief to hear someone else's experiences have been so close to mine, since I never had any contact with other children with communication disorders when I was growing up. The "stutter in his head" description your son gives does sound similar to what I experience. Screening out background noises (which I suspect is part of the reasoning behind the microphone set up?) helps quite a bit.

And, yes, I did make up a language as a kid! I've actually been working on one for a book I'm writing, too, so it's an ongoing fascination.

Sounds like you've got an awesome kid, there. Best of luck to managing this.
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:50 PM
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I have very minor synasthesia. For me, numbers, letters and colors have gender. For instance, red, yellow, orange and purple are female; green, blue, brown, white, and black are male. A, C, E, F and G are male; B, D, and H are female, etc.

As I think about it, states and countries have gender, too, although it's a much, much weaker association, and the vast majority of them are male.

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Old 02-20-2009, 09:03 PM
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I also see certain numbers and letters as having a gender and color, and age.

Question for everyone: have your assigned colors, smells and genders changed over the years, or is S, for example still the same color it's always been?
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Old 02-20-2009, 09:07 PM
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This is why, at age 19, I still can't tell left from right with any certainty.

Try this trick that my kids showed me-

Make a fist, then straighten and stick out your index finger and thumb. Your left hand will be making the shape of an "L" for left- your right hand will not.

Does that help?
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Old 02-20-2009, 09:18 PM
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Question for everyone: have your assigned colors, smells and genders changed over the years, or is S, for example still the same color it's always been?
It's the same as ever, except some of the associations are weaker than they were when I was a kid.

Here is a webcomic about synesthesia.

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Old 02-21-2009, 08:27 AM
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...("6 multiplied by 7" is a sweet sentence that always makes me feel loved)...
Huh. Maybe Douglas Adams was right.
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Old 02-21-2009, 11:19 AM
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Question for everyone: have your assigned colors, smells and genders changed over the years, or is S, for example still the same color it's always been?
For me they're the same as they've always been, and the associations haven't gotten any weaker as I've gotten older.
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Old 02-21-2009, 06:34 PM
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I'm not sure whether my colors have stayed the same or not. When I first realized I was a synnie, I wasn't so sure of my colors, and I thought S might be scarlet red. Now I'm pretty sure it's pink, and it's stayed pink the whole long while.
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Old 02-21-2009, 07:16 PM
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Do people do this with time/concepts, too? To me, a year is shaped like an oval, and I'm standing in the middle of it facing in different directions. If I think of November, I'm facing North and it's in the 10:00 position, but if I think of July, I'm facing South and it's in the 6:00 position (12:00 to my perspective).
Okay, I have a question on all of this. My understanding was that actual synesthesia (the neurological condition) results in an experience where, for example, a person literally sees every number 4 as though it were written in green ink. What's expressed above, to me, doesn't seem to meet this criteria; it's certainly a way of thinking metaphorically, and it a great mnemonic device, but I'm not getting how this is any different than standard, normally-wired creative thinking.

I mean, when I smell the air after a spring rainstorm, I think to myself about how green it smells. When in the same room with shrieking children, the sensation that their sound makes me feel is pain like shattered glass. I don't have better words to describe what that particular sound feels like to me, but even though I associate it with shattered glass, I think it's still a metaphor, not a literal experiencing of sound/pain as shattering glass. For that matter, I think of the year/seasons as the Wheel of the Year, shaped like a wagon wheel (or sometimes a compass or sundial), divided into quarters by solstices and equinoxes and those quarters further divided by the mid-season agricultural holidays; but I know damn well that this a metaphor I picked up from my spiritual mythology/training. It's also a handy mnemonic device, as I tend to be rather visually oriented.

Can someone draw a clearer distinction for me? Where does a creatively-thinking brain end and a neurological condition begin, in terms of how people experience this? Am I a synesthete and just never realized it?
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:28 PM
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Okay, so there's two types of syn-

There's projective synesthesia, where you literally do see colors or hear sounds or whatever in the real world. In other words, what you've considered synesthesia.

Then there's associative synesthesia, where you don't actually see the colors, but you have a feeling about it. You know that 4 is blue, or that that song is tiger-striped.

The key here is random and consistant. If you think wet air smells green because you associate green with plants, that's not syn. If today you think 4 is blue, and tomorrow you think it's pink, that's not syn. If you think 4 is blue, and 4 has always been blue for you (or changes very slowly over time; that point hasn't been resolved), and there's no intrinsic reason for 4 to be blue, that's synesthesia.

Now having a shape to your year, that's syn. So you're still a synethete, even thought the smell-of-rain thing isn't.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:48 PM
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Can someone draw a clearer distinction for me? Where does a creatively-thinking brain end and a neurological condition begin, in terms of how people experience this? Am I a synesthete and just never realized it?
Like Malleus, Incus, Stapes! said, for many types of synesthetes our experiences are literal. I don't imagine the color white when I hear a refrigerator motor kick on, or imagine the color purple when a truck using jake brakes passes by on the highway. I literally see flashes of color. It's not something I have any control over, though I wish I did because I find it irritating much of the time.
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Old 02-21-2009, 10:03 PM
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The type I have is called "Ordinal Linguistic Personification"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinal...ersonification
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Old 02-22-2009, 01:11 AM
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Now having a shape to your year, that's syn. So you're still a synethete, even thought the smell-of-rain thing isn't.
Well, that's funny, because I threw that out as about the least synesthetic example I got. It's taken directly from mythology I've read/learned/was taught over the years. It's a solid association, yes, but it didn't originate with me. "The Wheel of the Year" is a tarot card, for pete's sake. We speak of seasons and agriculture in terms of cycles, which is related to circles, particularly "turning" circles, hence the wheel. Seeing cyclical time as something more-or-less circular-shaped is a common feature of Western culture. Clocks are round, sundials are round. Even Stonehenge was built in a circle. Compasses are round, too, and are divided into the eight main compass points, which correspond to the eight major astrological and agricultural holidays.

For that matter, when thinking in terms of a series of events, rather than repeating cyclical time, I imagine it as a line -- i.e. linear time. An event/milestone from three years ago is farther to the left than one from two months ago.

A song or a particular style of music might make me feel warm, or cold. Some songs have given me a brief shiver.

Green is associated with the smell of chlorophyll, which is where the after-rain smell comes from. I've known it to smell more golden-yellow-green after the rain if the weather is warmer.

All of which I think demonstrates that I have a highly creative mind which automatically uses metaphor, associative memory, and imagined visual/sensory information as a way of processing, understanding, and remembering information. So while I get how literally seeing colors that aren't there is synesthesia, I don't get how imagining/"knowing" them to be there is. Why in particular make the leap from a "creative mind" to "synesthesia"? My mental image of linear time is just as automatic -- I've thought of it that way ever since I can remember, and most of the time I'm not even consciously aware that I'm mentally making hash marks on a timeline, unless I stop to think about it, simply because I'm paying attention to the conversation I'm having. But it's still a creative adaptation, not a "my neurons got crossed" kind of thing, unless I totally miss my guess. I probably made that association as a child, as something that made linear time-related things easier to remember, and it became ingrained. Short of something like a functional MRI I don't see why there'd be an assumption of synesthesia on anything like that. If I made up stories to amuse myself as a child about the letter A and her boyfriend B, I'd think that would get ingrained and become an automatic pattern of thinking pretty quickly too.

I certainly don't think it's bad to be highly imaginative (given that I am), but I also don't think it's the same thing as a neurological condition. I assume that most of you did not get a functional MRI done, so where are you drawing the line, and why?

I suppose the sound to pain to glass thing might be, but I only get pain / discomfort / nausea associations with a few types of sounds that are particularly annoying. It corresponds more to particular frequencies/pitches than volume, although loud volume at a bad pitch is worse than soft volume at a bad pitch.
  #36  
Old 02-22-2009, 03:16 PM
DrCube is offline
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Can I ask if I'm one? Because I'm not sure if what I do counts or not.

Basically, numbers, letters and mathematical symbols all have a characteristic color in my mind. Lower-case 'j's are light brown, upper case Js are more orange-ish, T's are green, Xs are grey, addition is purple-y, π is pinkish, etc. Lots of other ideas/concepts have colors, too, but it is harder to notice when they don't have a definite shape like symbols.

Since when I'm reading, the letters are all black or whatever the font color is, I never thought I was a synesthete, but whenever I think of the symbols or ideas they represent, the color is right there in my mind. But it is not like I taste colors or smell music or anything, though.

Anyway, do I count?

EDIT: Should have read more than half the thread before posting. Doh! (Music is mighty colorful to me too. But it's all in my head, not *real life*. I'm beginning to think I'm just an imaginative person and not some special synesthete.)

Last edited by DrCube; 02-22-2009 at 03:21 PM.
  #37  
Old 02-22-2009, 04:45 PM
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Full-blown synesthete-freak here, who also uses "it" to compose music to this day. And to write. Rawr.

I cross just about every one of the senses, from a synesthetic standpoint and have participated in a number of studies (including one involving fMRI, which was insanely cool to do.) I also have temporal lobe epilepsy, exacerbated by a brain injury 10+ years ago (turning what once were only simple partial seizures into complex partial seizures). There's possibly a link between TLE and the synesthesia.

I'm a grapheme/sound (music, etc.)/lexical/number --> color/taste/smell/texture synesthete. Freaked the shit out of my parents as a kid, argued that the colored alphabets in my childhood books were all wrong (God damn it, As are red... interestingly, they are for many of us...), tended to make comments about certain foods tasting of certain colors, added numbers up to colors (1+1 = green) and, for the record, I still think E major tastes like earwax.

My dear and beloved husband likes to torture me by saying the words "nurse" and "plunge" over and over again knowing that, to me, they taste like goose-poop yellow (and dishsoap) and feel like nails on a chalkboard... (gaaaaaah!)

As for music -- everything has a hue, every key has a color, every note has a color. It's not actually something you "see when you close your eyes", nor does it change at ALL. Specific notes, specific keys or tones ALWAYS have the same color (or hue). Household appliances buzz at the same damned frequency (which happens to be the same shade of purple). When my piano goes slightly flat, it drives me 'round the bend -- C minor, my favorite key, goes sour and I can't stand it. You can't turn the colors/tastes/textures off. In some synesthetic kids, it's enough to drive them totally 'round the bend (and makes them into fussy eaters, or hyperactive, or totally over-stimulated)... Heck, I was one weiiiiiird little girl m'self and far from being a bowl of petunias. I'm still a bit of a weirdo but whatcha gonna do... (other than become a composer, drama/musical theater teacher and screenwriter, right? Right...)
  #38  
Old 02-22-2009, 09:32 PM
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Just as an aside, Wendy Mass wrote a young-adult book about synesthesia, called A Mango-Shaped Space. It's pretty good, and is a nice introduction to the phenomenon. I saw it in a bookstore and since it was about cats and synesthesia, two subjects I'm very interested in, I had to pick it up. When I finished I sent the author an email telling her how much I enjoyed seeing a synesthetic character for kids, and she actually wrote back to me. She's not a synesthete herself, but she interviewed quite a few of them while researching the book.
  #39  
Old 02-23-2009, 02:16 PM
Malleus, Incus, Stapes! is offline
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Yeah, on the synesthete message board, about half the poeple say they came there because "i read this book called A MAngo Shaped Space, lol, and i thought it was so cool/didnt know it had a name. lol".
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