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Old 09-20-2010, 09:45 PM
Johnny L.A. is online now
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Oh, dear. Too much lamb.


Doncha hate it when that happens?

I wanted a pound of lamb shoulder for the cassoulet (looks like I'll attempt it sooner than expected), but the butcher would only sell the whole piece. So I bought it and had him cut it up into a half-dozen steaks. I've just had one, seasoned simply with garlic salt and black pepper, pan-fried medium-rare in a cast-iron skillet. I'm getting all my lamb from this butcher. It's much better than the shoulder steaks at the supermarket. Tender and tasty!

I like roast leg of lamb, grilled or pan-fried lamb steaks, and ground lamb seasoned with garlic and parsley. I'll try to make a cassoulet. Someday I'll learn to make souvlaki.

How do you like your lamb?
  #2  
Old 09-20-2010, 09:52 PM
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Lamb kofta is a favorite around here (made with cinnamon, cumin, mint or cilantro, and pine nuts), served with saffron rice made with raisins and sauteed almonds; also lamb curry. Lamb chops with rosemary and garlic, of course, accompanied by roasted potatoes with more rosemary.

I almost forgot meatloaf made with ground beef and ground lamb. It's a variation on Alton Brown's recipe.

Last edited by Chefguy; 09-20-2010 at 09:53 PM.
  #3  
Old 09-20-2010, 09:53 PM
Johnny L.A. is online now
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Oh, yeah. Lamb curry. That's what happens to the leftover leg-o-lamb -- when it's not made into shepherd's pie.
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Old 09-20-2010, 10:07 PM
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Freeze the leftover leg. It may come in handy some day.
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Old 09-20-2010, 10:08 PM
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I usually make a rogan josh, a fairly mild lamb curry that can't make up its mind whether it wants to have a yogurt base or a tomato base. I make a mean lamb korma, but my wife complains that it is too hot for her poor little sphincter, so that's fairly rare. (I don't know what she'd make of my lamb vindaloo, which actually is quite spicy.)

Sometimes I'll make a fairly straightforward stew with rosemary dumplings. You know, for those times when you want to feel like somebody's maiden auntie. (And to have praise lavished on you by people with very mild tastes. Like, Quebecoise mild.)
  #6  
Old 09-20-2010, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Mudd View Post
I don't know what she'd make of my lamb vindaloo, which actually is quite spicy.
You're, ah... going to post your recipe, right?
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Old 09-20-2010, 10:20 PM
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Just simmer simply with some yoghurt, water, dried chickpeas, some curry masala for some few hours, and finish with your favorite or available fresh herbs... mint, basil, thyme, and rosemary. Salt of course.

Last edited by devilsknew; 09-20-2010 at 10:22 PM.
  #8  
Old 09-20-2010, 10:22 PM
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If you have extra shoulder, I can't recommend this recipe enough: Spanish Style Lamb Stew

I've also used shank and it came out fine, but the butchering took a while.
  #9  
Old 09-20-2010, 10:24 PM
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Ooh, where'd you get it? I love lamb - the gamier the better.
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Old 09-20-2010, 10:34 PM
Johnny L.A. is online now
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Originally Posted by stargazer View Post
Ooh, where'd you get it? I love lamb - the gamier the better.
http://www.donandjoesmeats.com/

Not gamy, just nice and tender.

I used to love the preseasoned leg-o-lamb from Trader Joe's. Unfortunately, they stopped carrying it. So jonzin' for a roast, I bought one from Don and Joe's. I rubbed it with olive oil, kosher salt, black pepper, and dried rosemary. The rub was very similar to TJ's, but the meat was much better. The shoulder steak I had tonight was also better than TJ's or Fred Meyer's. Don and Joe's gets their lamb from Superior Farms in Davis or Dixon, CA, so it's almost quasi-local.
  #11  
Old 09-20-2010, 11:18 PM
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You know, lamb is much better when shared with friends!
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
You're, ah... going to post your recipe, right?
It's variable to the point of vagary, and it's a bit painful to go through the steps in my head, since I know I'm unlikely to make a vindaloo any time soon -- but here it is approximately, as an act of masochism:
1 pound of lamb, cubed
1/4 cup of yogurt
1 tablespoon coriander paste
4 tablespoons olive oil
6 cloves of garlic, chopped
2 tsp chili powder
1 teaspoon cumin
8 chili peppers, finely diced
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1/2 tablespoon dijon mustard (yes, really)
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1 onion, diced
1 potato, diced
1 cup of coconut milk
1 cup of beef stock
Mash up the chilis and garlic with the coriander paste, then mix in the dijon, cumin, turmeric, chili powder, cinnamon, vinegar and yogurt.

Sautee the onion and potatoes in the olive oil over a medium heat until onions are soft and add the spice mixture. Stir ocassionally for 5 minutes or a little longer, adding a bit of water (or a very little bit of rosewater) midway. I sometimes throw a splash of ale in there and nobody has complained about it.

Raise the heat to medium-high and throw the lamb in there. Stir constantly for five minutes or so.

Add coconut milk and beef stock, allow to come to a boil, then simmer for up to an hour, with a little attention.
This is probably a little less acidic than a proper vindaloo. I sometimes add a little Shriracha sauce near the end; I'm not proud.
  #13  
Old 09-20-2010, 11:21 PM
Johnny L.A. is online now
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Hey, Sriracha sauce goes great with lamb! Almost used it tonight.
  #14  
Old 09-20-2010, 11:50 PM
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throw some Cajun seasoning on it and grill it.
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Old 09-21-2010, 01:31 AM
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Quote:
How do you like your lamb?
I've never had lamb that I disliked. Unfortunately, my husband DOESN'T like it, so I rarely make it at home.
  #16  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:08 AM
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Around here we have North African Lamb Kabobs. These are really good, and the dipping sauce is excellent, too.

You can never have too much lamb.
  #17  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:31 AM
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Each year, I have a freezer lamb from my own flock and it seems like every year, I have a new part that I fall in love with. At first, legs and chops were my go-to for recipes and the rest sat in my freezer a bit too long. Got to the end of it and discovered that all this time, my lonely package of neck bones were sitting neglected in the freezer and they are by far my favorite lamb part. Stewed, baked or bbq'd - the flavor and tenderness can't be beat.

This year, I decided I would start with more difficult cuts like the shoulder and save the chops and leg steaks for a pinch. I de-boned the shoulder, saved the bones for stock (which I'm still debating what to do with ) and made kabobs to die for. Mmmmm.

Found a good curry marinade recipe here Laura's Lamb Marinade which is great on leg steaks. Thinking of bringing my rack of riblets to the next family bbq - been trying to convert my family of non-lamb eaters but so far, cooking it away from home hasn't turned out as well as I hoped.

Already got my eye on next year's lamb, mmmmm!
  #18  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LVBoPeep View Post
Already got my eye on next year's lamb, mmmmm!
And the lamb is all like, 'Why do you keep looking at me? '
  #19  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:37 AM
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Lamburgers.

Two ways of doing them:

using minced lamb -

add chopped chili
chopped coriander(cilantro) - substitute rosemary if you dislike the coriander(cilantro)
grated lime or lemon zest plus a squirt of juice
to the mince and make patties

make burgers (tomato, lettuce etc) using aioli to butter the bread.

using lamb steaks -

add the chili, cilantro/rosemary, lemon/lime to the aioli
cook lamb steaks, smearing at the end with above mixture
assemble into burger using lots of the aioli mix to butter the bread.
  #20  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:39 AM
Johnny L.A. is online now
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There's a brewery in town that makes a pretty good lamb burger.
  #21  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:39 AM
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I make a frenched rack of lamb thusly:

1. Season with salt & pepper and sear on all sides (about 2 minutes per side). Let cool.
2. Mix a few TBSP dijon mustard with some minced garlic. Spread all over lamb (except bones of course.)
3. Mix a cup of breadcrumbs with 1/4 to 1/2 cup of grated Parmesan or Romano, coat lamb.
4. Finish in a 425 oven until done to your liking.
  #22  
Old 09-21-2010, 08:58 AM
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There's a brewery in town that makes a pretty good lamb burger.
Lamb burger and beer. Case closed.
  #23  
Old 09-21-2010, 12:50 PM
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Does anyone know of a really good (good lamb and good prices) place to order lamb online and have it delivered? Lamb can be pretty hard to find where I live.
  #24  
Old 09-21-2010, 03:41 PM
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For a leg or butterflied roast:
Day before make a marinade of equal parts lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and olive oil with some fresh cracked black pepper, oregano, thyme and mint. Take a knife to the leg or roast ad trim off excess fat. Poke holes all over, and insert slivers of garlic and rosemary spikes. Marinate the lamb overnight, or at least 6 hours. I prefer to do it over coal rather than a gas grill, but that is up to you. If you do it over coals, you can toss on bits of rosemary and mint stems occasionally. Baste with marinade that has been simmered on the fire to render it cooked [dont want cross contamination =)] and excess marinade can be used on a pan of roasting veggies, carrots, celery, potato and onions. The same marinade can be used for saslik [shishkebabs]

For a rack of lamb:
Peel any excess fat off, give it a good rub down with olive oil, and lightly salt and pepper the rack, make sure it is at room temp. Arrange the grill rack in a roasting pan, put some white wine and water in the bottom of the pan, and on the rack lay out sprigs of rosemary, thyme and oregano, mint is optional. Set the rack of lamb on top of the herbs. Toss some garlic and whole peppercorns into the water. Lid the roasting pan and set in a low [250 degree fahr] oven for half an hour to steam the herb flavors into the meat. Then pop the top off, and insert the probe into the tiny little rack of lamb, and bring the temp up to 350 fahr and roast until the internal temp is 110 for rare, 120 medium and 130 med well. I prefer to pop it out at 105 and tent it under foil on the cutting board and finish it off that way for about 10 minutes. I infuse apple jelly with lots and lots of mint a day o so before, by heating the jelly in a small sauce pan with a touch of cider vinegar to thin it down a bit, and as much mint as I can stuff in with it. I reheat and strain to get the mint leaves out. It isn't so jaw wrenchingly sweet as straight commercial mint jelly, nor as sour as mint sauce.

When I have a few racks of ribs, I like to make them up and then freeze them in single portion packages. Makes instant entertainment easier.

Lamb also makes good chili, great meatballs, stew. if I have assorted bones with a bit of meat scrap on them, I freeze them and baggie them so I can have the lamb flavor in my lentil soup - it is really easy. Pot with 2 cups of lentils, 1 large onion, couple stalks celery, couple chopped carrots, few cloves of garlic, bay leaf, sprigs of thyme, some oregano and a couple bones on the wood fire for a few hours. When it is time to eat, the meat bits have fallen off the bones, if the bones are marrow bearing I crack them with the back of my knife before turfing them into the pot so the marrow makes it into the broth. You just want enough water to come over the top of the ingredients by a tiny bit, you can always add more water as the lentils absorb it. Serve it with a nice bread =) You can use ham or pork bones in the same way, though I prefer split peas with piggy stuff.
  #25  
Old 09-21-2010, 06:28 PM
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I have a long time (Greek) friend who has a restaurant in the Washington DC area. When I last ate there(2 years ago), he allowed as how the commercial lamb you get in the US is mainly from New Zealand? He gets all his from a guy in Colorado(I think). He pays much more than from a common commercial source, but he thinks it's worth the price. The chops and etc. I have had at his restaurant makes me a believer.

Any comments?
  #26  
Old 09-21-2010, 06:35 PM
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I like lamb in various Indian dishes, but as chops and such I often find it disappointing. I grew up eating mutton, and I guess I just expect lamb to have a lot more flavor than it does.
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