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Old 10-20-2014, 05:33 PM
aceplace57 is offline
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When did Canada start requiring Americans to get Passports?


I recall that we had an open border with Canada. There's several towns that are divided by the border. I recall a news report that profiled a town library that was on the border. You could cross countries just walking from Fiction to Non-Fiction. People went back and forth all the time. They might live in Canada and walk two blocks to their job in the U.S. I know security tightened after 9/11, but AFAIK passports and visa weren't required.

I was considering a hunting trip in Canada. This link surprised me. They say Passports are required, what about a Visa?

When did passports become required just to enter Canada from the US? Is the reverse true? Do Canadians need a passport to enter the US? This seems burdensome. People along the border shop in both countries. They have relatives and friends in both countries.

This is a good link for anyone considering a hunting trip. I'd really enjoy hunting duck, geese and other waterfowl in Canada.
http://gssafaris.hubpages.com/hub/gssafaris
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Please plan well ahead of time as some of these tasks require lead time and not adhering to this rules can ruin your Canada hunting trip and cost you in lost hunting, outfitter, hunting license and travel fees.

1. Passport – A passport is required to enter Canada by car, sea or air. If you don’t have one, plan on getting one now, don’t wait. Normal lead time can be 6-8 weeks or more. You can get your U.S. Passport application online by going

Last edited by aceplace57; 10-20-2014 at 05:36 PM.
  #2  
Old 10-20-2014, 05:38 PM
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My guess is September 11th, 2001.
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Old 10-20-2014, 05:43 PM
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My guess is September 11th, 2001.
It is much more recent that.

"Under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, as of January 23, 2007, citizens of both Canada and the United States were required to present a valid passport at a U.S. Preclearance Facility -- located at all major Canadian airports -- prior to boarding their flight to the United States. Beginning June 1, 2009, it was established that travelers entering the U.S. through a land or sea border must present a passport or WHTI-compliant document."

http://canada.usembassy.gov/travelin...uirements.html
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Old 10-20-2014, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
They say Passports are required, what about a Visa?
Visas are not required for short personal visits.

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Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
When did passports become required just to enter Canada from the US? Is the reverse true?
They're still not required, though the lack of a passport means another form of acceptable ID is required. This can be a trusted traveler card - like the GlobalEntry - or a passport card. Some US states and Canadian provinces also have enhanced driver's licenses that combine a regular driver's license with some features of a passport for purposes of crossing the US-Canada border. And yes, it does work both ways.

It's been this way for nearly 10 years, after the enhanced security requirements following 9/11.

Yes, it's more of a hassle than it used to be, but you can imagine the outcry if we did nothing to secure the single longest international border the US has.
  #5  
Old 10-20-2014, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Ulfreida View Post
My guess is September 11th, 2001.
Your guess is wrong. It was because of 9-11, but they weren't required until June 2009. But actually they aren't strictly required. You can have a Nexus card, a passport card (though it's not valid for entry by air), or an enhanced driver's license instead (ditto). Commercial truckers also have some kind of express thing.
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Old 10-20-2014, 05:55 PM
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Thank you. I'll be sure and apply for a Passport several months before planning any trips to Canada.

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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
It is much more recent that.

"Under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, as of January 23, 2007, citizens of both Canada and the United States were required to present a valid passport at a U.S. Preclearance Facility -- located at all major Canadian airports -- prior to boarding their flight to the United States. Beginning June 1, 2009, it was established that travelers entering the U.S. through a land or sea border must present a passport or WHTI-compliant document."

http://canada.usembassy.gov/travelin...uirements.html
  #7  
Old 10-20-2014, 06:01 PM
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More United States policy than Canadian. If we won't let people back in without a passport, it is only good sense they require one too. Else people of questionable immigration status would just get stuck in Canada when denied re-entry to the U.S.

A guy at work was bitching that Canada not letting his son visit because of a 15 year old DUI. I pointed out that it is the US government who is gleefully shares all this info with the entire world.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Ulfreida View Post
My guess is September 11th, 2001.
Not quite, but sometimes thereafter. Canada started requiring Americans to have passports when America started requiring Canadians to have passports.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:13 PM
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Living in a border state the "enhance license" offered by the state was pushed well before the requirement was enforced. I'd guess most of the people close to borders heard similar messages when renewing their licenses. It was a US driven change. Canada couldn't very well let US travelers enter without those documents since we couldn't go back home.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:42 PM
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More United States policy than Canadian. If we won't let people back in without a passport, it is only good sense they require one too. Else people of questionable immigration status would just get stuck in Canada when denied re-entry to the U.S.

A guy at work was bitching that Canada not letting his son visit because of a 15 year old DUI. I pointed out that it is the US government who is gleefully shares all this info with the entire world.
The US has denied entry to Canadians for the same reasons.
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Old 10-20-2014, 07:02 PM
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When did Canada start requiring Americans to get Passports?


I think the difference is that the US normally regards DWI as a misdemeanour, so a single conviction may not bar a Canadian from entry into the US.

Canada always regards it as a criminal offence (we don't use the misdemeanour/felony distinction), so a single conviction may bar an American entry to Canada.
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Last edited by Northern Piper; 10-20-2014 at 07:03 PM.
  #12  
Old 10-20-2014, 07:28 PM
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Before I drove to Canada in 2007, I called them. They said an original birth certificate would do. So that is what I used. Next time in 2011 I needed a passport.
The U S State department has two different passports. A book costs $110 adults ($80 children under 16), is good for 10 years (5 for children) and is good anywhere by any means of travel (many countries require it is good for 6 months after you enter so check first). A passport card cost $30 ($15 child) and is only good for travelling by boat or card to Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean. You can not fly with it so you are SOL if you drive to Canada and need an emergency air flight. There is also a separate $25 fee for the place that processes it (town hall, post office,etc). It takes 4-6 weeks (can be quicker and usually is). There is an expedited service that runs about $85 more and takes. You need it quicker-call State Department and make sure you have proof you need it in less than two weeks...such as airline tickets. State Dept wants $110/$80 by check or money
To get a passport book or card, you need proof of citizenship: original, raised seal birth certificate, naturalization papers, or birth overseas consular certificate. This proof of citizenship gets submitted to the State Department and they mail it back. They do not want a photocopy. You need valid government issue id: driver's license, military id, resident id, police id.
If you are doing for a child, both parents (if both are on the childs birth certificate) must be present, along with child (believe it or not, some people think they can get a child's passport without the child being there. No no no no.). If one isn't, adequate proof must be submitted: death certificate if one is dead, signed notarized state dept consent with photo copy of id shown to notary (If drivers license, photocopy BOTH sides. Many notaries don't realize but the state dept will not accept without sides, and do not put it on two sides of the sheet. Either on same side or two separate, make the legible. If divorced, submit original papers showing sole (not full) custody. If both parents are there, both need valid government photo id. If don't have, try to get or check with State Dept or acceptance office first as to what you can use.
It is a good idea to have form (DS-11) filled out first- black ink, don't use whiteout (invented by the mother of Mike Nesmith of the Monkees), if make mistake, cross out with one line. For "parents name at birth", the State Dept wants your mother's maiden name. Do sign it, that comes at the end when you do what the State Dept says is the most important: swearing your statement is true, as best you know. If there are some things you just don't know, like place or date of parents birth, don't fill it out. State Dept wants accuracy.
Photos: you need a State Dept approved photo. Certain size for head , white/off white background, eye pupil color visible. Religious headgear is fine, medical headgear needs doctor's note, anything else is not. No exaggerated goofy expressions, full face. Proper lighting. The vast majority of times these various drug stores do a good job but there are a few mistakes. Most acceptance offices (check travel.state.gov for sites and info) can take photos for a fee.
Keep in mind an acceptance office only accepts the form. The State Dept makes the final decision. I did have them reject one because the applicant, an African-American had very black skin and they felt the photo wasn't clear enough. He was polite about it and I put enough light on for the second one to pass.
If our highly dedicated, hard working, benevolent members of Congress ever have another government shut down, fear not. The State Dept makes money on passports ($110 apiece they should) so that branch isn't shut

Retired (I LOVE that 7 letter word) Passport Acceptance Agent. I believe everything is still true but check first with State or local office.
  #13  
Old 10-20-2014, 07:32 PM
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The only reason Canada requires Americans to have a passport is so that the Americans can get back into the USA.

There is no visa requirement for Americans entering Canada.

People with a conviction that in Canada could be indictable conviction are not allowed in unless they do the Group W bench thing (prove that they have redeemed themselves, which takes a bit of time and money on both the USA end and the Canadian end, so don't leave it until the last minute).

In Canada we have three different ways of proceeding with a charge: summary, hybrid or indictable. Summary offences are usually what would be prosecuted in the USA as a misdemeanor, and indictable offences are usually what would be prosecuted in the USA as a felony. Where it gets muddled is with hybrid offences, in which the Crown can proceed either summarily or via indictment. If someone in the USA is convicted of a charge which in Canada could have proceeded by indictment (meaning it is either a hybrid offence or an indictable offence), then admission into the Great White is barred.

For example, let's take having a couple of beers too many and going joyriding in an old scrapper that isn't worth towing to the junk yard. In Canada, these would be hybrid offences that could proceed summarily or by indictment, so since it is possible that they could proceed by indictment, the American would not be allowed in. It wouldn't matter if the American had been convicted for misdemeanor theft and misdemeanor drunk driving rather that felony theft and felony drunk driving. The only thing that Canadian Customs would consider is whether or not it could have proceeded via indictment in Canada.

The moral of the story is to check with a Canadian criminal lawyer well in advance of trying to enter into Canada if you have any conviction of any type on your record. The lawyer can tell you if it would or would not have been possible to proceed via indictment.

Last edited by Muffin; 10-20-2014 at 07:36 PM.
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Old 10-20-2014, 09:04 PM
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This year is the first I've heard of the DWI bar for entry into Canada. Regrettably, I was convicted of misdemeanor DUI over 16 years ago and have traveled to Canada probably 15 times since then, both by air and land and have never been questioned.

But just last month a family friend was barred entry for an 8 year old DUI conviction. Is this something that is hit or miss or will I be barred entry as technology improves? Is there a way around the ban?
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Old 10-20-2014, 09:41 PM
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Canada couldn't very well let US travelers enter without those documents since we couldn't go back home.
If we ended up with a surplus of Americans, there would be great imbalance in the Force. That ain't good for anyone.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:18 PM
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This year is the first I've heard of the DWI bar for entry into Canada. Regrettably, I was convicted of misdemeanor DUI over 16 years ago and have traveled to Canada probably 15 times since then, both by air and land and have never been questioned.

But just last month a family friend was barred entry for an 8 year old DUI conviction. Is this something that is hit or miss or will I be barred entry as technology improves? Is there a way around the ban?
It's hit and miss, and will get tighter as more historical data is entered. A sixteen year old misdemeanor might not have been high on the data entry priority list.

"Son, ha-ve you re-ha-bil-i-ta-ted your-self?"

If you run into difficulty, ask the officer to deem you to be rehabilitated. This is a bit risky, for if you are denied, your vacation is shot to hell. Note that you cannot be deemed to be rehabilitated if you could have received ten years or more for the penalty in Canada. For example, when someone drives drunk, usually the penalty is up to five years, but if someone injures a person while driving drunk, the penalty is up to ten years. If your only run in with the law is a misdemeanor DUI 16 years ago, odds are that you will be deemed to be rehabilitated, by why risk it?

A safer course is to apply for rehabilitation. Fill out a form, attach your record search, a copy of the law under which you were convicted, something proving that you completed your sentence, and a couple of hundred bucks. Then sit there on the Group W bench until your application is processed -- perhaps a year or more.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:22 PM
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Yes, it's more of a hassle than it used to be, but you can imagine the outcry if we did nothing to secure the single longest international border the US has.
There are large areas in the West where the border between Canada and the US remains completely open, unguarded, unfenced and easy to cross.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by DinoR View Post
Canada couldn't very well let US travelers enter without those documents since we couldn't go back home.
If we ended up with a surplus of Americans, there would be great imbalance in the Force. That ain't good for anyone.
At the Highway 61 crossing the US Border Patrol usually lets Americans back in with a very stern warning after they call about for references, but it isn't something someone should depend upon, for sometimes people really are rejected, and have to hang out in Canada until their paperwork is in place, and occasionally (very rarely) that gets screwed up even further if the Canada Border Services Agency does not want to let you back into Canada loose on your own, so they might lock you away for the interregnum.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:48 PM
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The question should have been "When did Canada start requiring visiting Americans to have any form at all of ID?" Before 9/11, and for some time after, all you needed to do at the border was tell the immigration officer where you were born, and if your answer was not USA or Canada, of if they had some reason to not believe you, like a strong foreign accent, , then you could be asked for some form of identification, and a drivers license was usually sufficient. In maybe about 100 crossings, I don''t think I was ever asked for any papers at all. Even when I lived in Canada and had a car with Canadian plates and said I was American, I was just waved through, in both directions.

Last edited by jtur88; 10-20-2014 at 10:49 PM.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:58 PM
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It's hit and miss, and will get tighter as more historical data is entered. A sixteen year old misdemeanor might not have been high on the data entry priority list.

"Son, ha-ve you re-ha-bil-i-ta-ted your-self?"

If you run into difficulty, ask the officer to deem you to be rehabilitated. This is a bit risky, for if you are denied, your vacation is shot to hell. Note that you cannot be deemed to be rehabilitated if you could have received ten years or more for the penalty in Canada. For example, when someone drives drunk, usually the penalty is up to five years, but if someone injures a person while driving drunk, the penalty is up to ten years. If your only run in with the law is a misdemeanor DUI 16 years ago, odds are that you will be deemed to be rehabilitated, by why risk it?

A safer course is to apply for rehabilitation. Fill out a form, attach your record search, a copy of the law under which you were convicted, something proving that you completed your sentence, and a couple of hundred bucks. Then sit there on the Group W bench until your application is processed -- perhaps a year or more.
Interesting. The individual officer has the power to deem me "rehabilitated" on the spot and waive me through? What if he says "no"? Can I back up 20 feet and then attempt to go through a different traffic lane where a different officer might be more sympathetic?

Also, what is the "Group W" bench?
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Old 10-20-2014, 11:06 PM
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The library that I mentioned in the OP is the Haskell Free Library and Opera House. It straddles the Canada / US border. A black line inside the building indicates the border.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haskell...nd_Opera_House

The towns are Derby Line Vermont and Stanstead, Quebec.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derby_Line,_Vermont

Last edited by aceplace57; 10-20-2014 at 11:11 PM.
  #22  
Old 10-20-2014, 11:35 PM
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....Also, what is the "Group W" bench?
The group W bench is from Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant." You can Google the lyrics.
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:24 AM
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Also, what is the "Group W" bench?
It's where they have you sit with all the mother stabbers and father rapers.
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:11 AM
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From what I know about thru-hiking the PCT (West coast US trail from Mexico to Canada borders), You can enter Canada w/o a passport or enhanced DL - and this crossing is unmanned, but you can not reenter the US without it.

This produces a 'one way gate' on the PCT. Most hikers travel from Mexico to Canada, after completion they hike the short distance to a Canadian town, instead of the nearest US town which is days away. But if you wish to start at the CA boarder and hike it south you have a logistical nightmare, you either have to start at the nearest US trailhead and hike days north to get to the point where you start heading south, or start in CA, hike the short distance to the start of the trail, illegally cross to start your hike - and this latter method makes it very hard to get permits that are needed as the PCT permit for the entire trail will not be issues to these hikers.
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:55 AM
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Interesting. The individual officer has the power to deem me "rehabilitated" on the spot and waive me through? What if he says "no"? Can I back up 20 feet and then attempt to go through a different traffic lane where a different officer might be more sympathetic?

Also, what is the "Group W" bench?
Nope, lining up again will only make matters worse. These days they keep track of how often you cross the border and if there have been any problems.

Group W bench: http://youtu.be/b0a6iWHSWbA
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Old 10-21-2014, 09:58 AM
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There are large areas in the West where the border between Canada and the US remains completely open, unguarded, unfenced and easy to cross.
Yes, of course, but that wouldn't stop people from complaining about how easy it is to cross at checkpoints.

Also, "easy" is kind of relative. There's a lot of wilderness out there.
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Old 10-21-2014, 10:10 AM
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Also, "easy" is kind of relative. There's a lot of wilderness out there.
It would be impossible to cross "in the wilderness" between Winnipeg and Montreal, without a pretty good boat. A few places, from the east end of Michigan's UP, where it can be done in winter on a snowmobile. But it would be easy from Vermont or a few places in eastern Maine, even in a car, which I have done..

Last edited by jtur88; 10-21-2014 at 10:13 AM.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:03 AM
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One item I read said the DUI entry denial was retaliation for a US policy that seemed to basically find any excuse possible to deny entry to Canadians.

One fellow I knew was a middle manager going down to a business conference in Washington, in his mid-50's. He was somewhat inebriated, and the customs agent in Toronto denied him entry to the USA based on a juvenile conviction when he was 17. Another guy, his mother called the police on him when he was 15 to "teach him a a lesson" over some pot she found in his room. He was 35, heading to the USA with his family to visit Disneyland, and denied entry due to a drug charge.

Apparently *any* drug conviction can get you denied entry. I recall one discussion where someone mentioned going to Burning Man; the US border agent asked if he had *ever* smoked dope, and when he said "yes", that was reason to deny him entry. Never admit to have committed a violation, even outside the country, even if not charged or convicted.

The customs agent can deny entry for almost any reason; once denied entry, trying to get in without going through the proper paperwork will guarantee no entry for 10 years or some such penalty. Since everything is computerized, don't expect a different lane or different crossing will work. As for that DUI, Canada and the USA share their police databases to some extent. Not sure if an Australian or French conviction will be seen, but almost everything in North America does.

Another case in the news, a woman who had attempted suicide while depressed was denied entry to the USA a year later as mentally unstable and a risk. The customs knew about the incident because they had access to her name and the 911 ambulance call details from the police database, even though there were no charges.

A customs agent was charged with a road rage assault on a Canadian tourist in Washington State. When he was appealing to not be fired, his proof how good an agent he was - he had denied the most number of Canadian entry to the USA in the Washington border crossing where he worked.

But to get back to the OP - this passport requirement is a result of the discovery(?) after 9/11 of just how flimsy the USA (and Canada) identification system was. Until then, it was very easy to get false identity drivers licenses, birth certificates, and many other documents. The passport was a document that ensured a certain level of due diligence had been applied in verifying identity and was the standard for other international travel anyway. As mentioned, there are now "enhanced drivers licenses" and similar documents where (a) a certain amount of identity verification had happened and (b) the document was hi-tech and tamper-proof to prevent alterations.
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:21 PM
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Nope, lining up again will only make matters worse. These days they keep track of how often you cross the border and if there have been any problems.

Group W bench: http://youtu.be/b0a6iWHSWbA
Thank you....it has been about 27 years straight that this is my Thanksgiving movie and ode...
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:21 PM
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Another thing that's led to tighter controls on the border (in addition to 9/11 and all that) is that there were some gun control laws that came into force in Canada in the late 90's and early 2000's including mandatory registration and bans on certain types of handguns. Prior to that, there wasn't anything Canadian customs were too worried about coming in from the US, hence the wave-throughs in many places, but afterwards the flow of illegal and/or unregistered guns from the states became a major concern.

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The question should have been "When did Canada start requiring visiting Americans to have any form at all of ID?" Before 9/11, and for some time after, all you needed to do at the border was tell the immigration officer where you were born, and if your answer was not USA or Canada, of if they had some reason to not believe you, like a strong foreign accent, , then you could be asked for some form of identification, and a drivers license was usually sufficient.
Sometime around 2006 (I think) I crossed over at a rural crossing in Montana and on the Canadian side they basically waved me through but on the way back the US people wanted a driver's license and a birth certificate or passport. Which I didn't have. Whoops! They gave me a stern talking to, but eventually let me back in... just this once.
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:05 PM
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. There's a lot of wilderness out there.
What about Glacier National Park, for example?
It straddles the border, and has plenty of hiking trails. If you're a wilderness backpacker, do you have to carry your passport?
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:42 PM
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What about Glacier National Park, for example?
It straddles the border, and has plenty of hiking trails. If you're a wilderness backpacker, do you have to carry your passport?
Glacier-Waterton is a bit of a special situation. There's a customs station at the south end of Waterton Lake that at least all the marked trails that cross the border go through. You can hike north of the customs station (or take the little boat trip down) from Canada without clearing US Customs. Undoubtedly you could do some bushwacking and get across without passing customs, but that's true of most of the US-BC border.

FWIW, even though there's not a whole lot of monitoring of the border itself, supposedly there is a fair amount of patrolling and electronic surveillance of places where the road networks on either side of the border are close. So it's not just a matter of walking across the small swath of cleared timber that marks the border-- if you're going to get caught it's likely going to be at the road on either end.
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Old 10-25-2014, 12:04 PM
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If an officer deems you rehabilitated, does that go into the system and make you permanently rehabilitated, or do you have to do the song and dance each time?

I might start that paperwork. Is it discretionary or is it pretty much "shall issue" if it is only a misdemeanor and the sentence is complete?
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Old 10-25-2014, 12:24 PM
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Song and dance each time if you are deemed rehabilitate by an officer at the crossing.

The permanent rehabilitation is discretionary decision, but if the only issue is a misdemeanor DUI form 16 years ago, the odds are very high that the rehabilitation would be granted.

The risk is that that if you are turned down either at the border for the one-visit-only process or through the visits-for-the-rest-of-your-life mail-in process, then the rejection will be on file and pop up on the screen the next time you try to enter Canada. I don't know what the procedure is for re-applying once already denied.
  #35  
Old 05-14-2018, 06:11 AM
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There are some locations where free entry into Canada is allowed. One is the PCT hiking trail, running from Mexico/US border to the US Canadian boarder. When getting to the northern end it is more common (and legal) to continue to the nearest town in Canada at this unmanned crossing. It is required to contact them once you reach civilization. It is however illegal to enter the US this way. There are also towns that are both US and CA, with the international line down the middle of the road. Usually another call saying that you will be in town and crossing for whatever reason (someones to drive out of town it is required to drive on the other side of the road, thus another country. Also there is a small exclave of the US somewhere near Wisconsin IIRC, where one must drive into CA to get to it (I think one can do it by boat also), there is a pull over and a telephone to call to get permission. There is no school, or no high school, in this exclave, the bus to the states has to stop 2x to make this call announcing each child upon crossing for permission.
  #36  
Old 05-14-2018, 08:34 AM
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there is a small exclave of the US somewhere near Wisconsin IIRC, where one must drive into CA to get to it (I think one can do it by boat also), there is a pull over and a telephone to call to get permission. There is no school, or no high school, in this exclave, the bus to the states has to stop 2x to make this call announcing each child upon crossing for permission.
Angle Inlet, MN.

And there is a school there, just not a high school.

And yes, I know this is a zombie thread. But I couldn't let the assertion that a bit of WI land touches Canada go uncorrected.
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Old 05-14-2018, 08:35 AM
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Note that if you live in some border states like Washington you can apply for an "Enhanced Driver's License" or ID which is acceptable for land/sea but not air.

As others have mentioned the issue is re-entry the U.S more than Canada's entry needs.

Last edited by rat avatar; 05-14-2018 at 08:35 AM.
  #38  
Old 05-14-2018, 09:51 AM
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Angle Inlet, MN.

And there is a school there, just not a high school.

And yes, I know this is a zombie thread. But I couldn't let the assertion that a bit of WI land touches Canada go uncorrected.
There's also Point Roberts, just south of Vancouver in British Columbia.
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Old 05-14-2018, 09:56 AM
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Hyder Alaska is another example of a place that only has road access through Canada.

They even use Canadian phone numbers and the Mounties are the only police force in the area. But they do have customs to come back into Canada. I drove over to see the town in December but nothing was open and had to be re-admitted to continue my drive South back to the US.

Some areas like Haines AK, are serviced by the Alaska State Ferry which is considered a part of the Alaska Marine Highway System.

Last edited by rat avatar; 05-14-2018 at 10:01 AM.
  #40  
Old 05-14-2018, 12:11 PM
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Hyder Alaska is another example of a place that only has road access through Canada.

They even use Canadian phone numbers and the Mounties are the only police force in the area.
And then there's their fire department: "During an Independence Day fireworks display, the organizers accidentally burned down their fire hall with the fire engine inside." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyder,_Alaska
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  #41  
Old 05-14-2018, 12:52 PM
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US major league baseball player not going to Canada to play because of legal issues. He plead guilty but has no sentence yet

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/ba...icle-1.3988958
  #42  
Old 05-14-2018, 01:32 PM
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US major league baseball player not going to Canada to play because of legal issues. He plead guilty but has no sentence yet

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/ba...icle-1.3988958
That seems fair -- he was indicted on charges of "disorderly conduct and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon." Gun offenses are taken particularly seriously in Canada.

Here are some examples of admittance denials going the other way that seem, to put it mildly, somewhat less justified:
Last year, media reported on the case of a Chilean woman who innocently told U.S. immigration officials in Los Angeles that she had smoked pot in Colorado: "It's legal there," she said. She found herself in a holding cell, then deported back to Chile with a lifetime ban on entering the United States, derailing a relationship with a U.S. citizen and her plans to attend grad school in Colorado.
https://globalnews.ca/news/3743970/m...ing-us-border/

-------

Matthew Harvey wants to take his three-year-old daughter Lika to Disneyland in California, but after being banned from the United States for the rest of his life, that task isn't going to be easy … "They said that I was inadmissible because I admitted to smoking marijuana after the age of 18 and before I'd received my medical marijuana licence," he said.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pot-...iver-1.3752278

-------

Ellen Richardson went to Pearson airport on Monday full of joy about flying to New York City and from there going on a 10-day Caribbean cruise for which she’d paid about $6,000. But a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent with the Department of Homeland Security killed that dream when he denied her entry.

"I was turned away, I was told, because I had a hospitalization in the summer of 2012 for clinical depression," said Richardson, who is a paraplegic and set up her cruise in collaboration with a March of Dimes group of about 12 others.
https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/201...l_details.html

-------

Amanda Box ... [is a] 38-year-old Toronto woman who is bipolar and takes medication ... in mid-September ... she went to Pearson Airport with her American boyfriend to go to his home in Colorado for a weekend ... While she was standing in front of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent, Box says he looked at his computer screen "and he said something about 'mental health issues.' Then he said, 'Yeah, you're really crazy'."

Box said he told her that she wasn't being allowed to enter the U.S. and that she needed more documentation because she was considered a "flight risk" ...
https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/201...ight_risk.html
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Old 05-14-2018, 02:39 PM
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If a person is convicted of a crime that could be prosecuted as an indictable offence in Canada, or convicted of a couple of non-indictable crimes, they are not eligible to be admitted into Canada. An indictable offence is a more serious offence, and a summary offence is a less serious offence. This does not directly correlate with American felony and misdemeanor offences, but is somewhat similar. The one that stops many Americans at the border when they try to enter Canada is having been convicted while impaired/blowing over etc. An offence of this type committed in Canada could be prosecuted as either a summary offence or an indictable offence, so an American with a misdemeanor conviction of this sort will not be admissible to Canada. In order to get into Canada, such a person would have to satisfy the Canadian Border Services Agency that they have been rehabilitated. "SON HAVE YOU REHABILITATED YOURSELF?" It might be as simple as explaining the circumstances, or as complicated as producing an exhaustive records search.
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  #44  
Old 05-14-2018, 03:30 PM
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There's also Point Roberts, just south of Vancouver in British Columbia.
Yep, been there, lovely place. Standard border crossing staffing however. One needs a passport or Nexus card.

I love my Nexus card.
  #45  
Old 05-14-2018, 03:43 PM
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Canada has access to a database that shows everyone in the US who is convicted of a crime?
  #46  
Old 05-14-2018, 04:25 PM
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Not everyone convicted of a crime, but ostensibly everyone convicted of a serious misdemeanor or a felony. If it is in your FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC), then we have access to it.
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Old 05-14-2018, 07:59 PM
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I noticed this wasn't documented above,

If you are in the US and are near the Canadian border and think you may qualify as being "deemed rehabilitated" you can ask for an assessment at a Port of Entry.

Being assessed at a Canadian Port of Entry

Here is the self checklist from that site:

You are eligible to apply for deemed rehabilitation at a port of entry if:
  • you only had one conviction in total or committed only one crime
  • at least ten years have passed since you completed all sentences (payment of all fees, jail time completed, restitution paid, etc.)
  • the crime you committed is not considered a serious crime in Canada AND
  • the crime did not involve any serious property damage, physical harm to any person, or any type of weapon.
If that fails you can go through the individual rehabilitation process at a visa application centre. In the US that means sending it via mail to LA or NYC, which takes a long time to process.

What ever you do, don't wait until your fellow travelers are approaching the border to let them know. As Muffin mentioned they do try to be reasonable. It is a wonderful country and well worth the effort if you have to go through these steps to visit.

While I have a clean record the only time I ever had any issues, which were much less impactful than US customs on the return trip.

1) I was a passenger in a car on the Washington State Ferry to Sidney BC, and I used a duffel bag with a very old and out of state airline name tag on a duffle bag. We won the random car search lottery and they asked me about it, but had no problems after explaining I just hadn't flown with that bag for a very long time.

2) I arrived at the Pleasant Camp Border Crossing north of Haines Alaska in December stating that I was driving up to Inuvik. Not many tourists drive the Dempster in Winter and this is about 4000 miles round trip, so I had to explain that I understood the distances involved and what my travel time expectations were that the trip would take two weeks and explain that I had planned for up to a month absence from work if there were weather issues.

I live in Seattle and have had to dash several people's travel dreams when they said they were going to "pop up to Alaska" for a few days so I understand that caution. Having someone show up and say that they are going to drive to the arctic circle on the shortest days of the year is reason to be concerned. But it felt like genuine concern and not like interrogation like the other direction.

Last edited by rat avatar; 05-14-2018 at 08:01 PM.
  #48  
Old 05-14-2018, 09:01 PM
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There are some locations where free entry into Canada is allowed.
The portages along the border between Lake of the Woods and Lake Superior, courtesy of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, but no dawdling allowed.
https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...rchid=15019429
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Last edited by Muffin; 05-14-2018 at 09:02 PM.
  #49  
Old 05-15-2018, 07:39 PM
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Note that if you live in some border states like Washington you can apply for an "Enhanced Driver's License" or ID which is acceptable for land/sea but not air.

As others have mentioned the issue is re-entry the U.S more than Canada's entry needs.
Interesting. I wonder if that's because it's RealID compliant?

There's also a passport card (issued by the same follks that issue regular passports) that is good for entry to Canada and the Caribbean but only via road or boat, not by air.

More and more states' driver's licenses are becoming RealID compliant. We live in Virginia, which is one of the last to do so. I don't know if that would suffice to return to the US and I wouldn't risk it without checking beforehand.

A non-RealID compliant license is in theory not acceptable for domestic air travel. A passport would suffice - but moronic TSA agents (I know that's redundant) have been known to fail to recognize this as valid ID.
  #50  
Old 05-15-2018, 09:11 PM
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Interesting. I wonder if that's because it's RealID compliant?

There's also a passport card (issued by the same follks that issue regular passports) that is good for entry to Canada and the Caribbean but only via road or boat, not by air.

More and more states' driver's licenses are becoming RealID compliant. We live in Virginia, which is one of the last to do so. I don't know if that would suffice to return to the US and I wouldn't risk it without checking beforehand.

A non-RealID compliant license is in theory not acceptable for domestic air travel. A passport would suffice - but moronic TSA agents (I know that's redundant) have been known to fail to recognize this as valid ID.
While Enhanced DLs are RealID compliant it is because they are Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative complaint.

Enhanced Licenses are proof of U.S. citizenship and RealID compliant DLs are not.
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