#1  
Old 05-23-2018, 04:58 AM
AK84 AK84 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 14,634
Historical oddities

No idea if this is the right forum, but hell.

* A well travelled man could have met Socrates, Confucius and Buddha.
* Herodotus, the father of history/and or lies, exists almost at the half point of recorded human history, 500 BC.
* Cleopatra, Mark Antony, Ceaser, and also Hannibal, Scipio etc are closer in time to the Neil Armstrong and tbe moon landing then they are to the building of the Pyramids. I think Alexander is about equidistant.
* Oxford University is older then Maccu Pichu.
* The earliest Bublical figure whose existance is attested is King Ahab, about 850 BC. There are recoreded historcial Egytian and Mesopotamian figures from 2000 years prior.
  #2  
Old 05-23-2018, 05:02 AM
AK84 AK84 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 14,634
Sharks have existed longer than the Rings of Saturn. Also trees and grass.
Charles Darwin and Steve Irwin owned the same Tortoise, which outlived both of them.

Last edited by AK84; 05-23-2018 at 05:05 AM.
  #3  
Old 05-23-2018, 06:26 AM
GreenWyvern GreenWyvern is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 824
The oldest school in the world (probably) is King's School, Canterbury. It was founded in 597 AD.

At that time Saxon England was still pagan, but King Ethelbert of Kent converted to Christianity and allowed the foundation of a monastery and a kind of 'missionary school'. Tradition has it that a temple of Woden was re-purposed for the monks and their school. A large stone abbey was completed in 613, and the ruins still stand today next to the modern school.

When the Normans conquered England, it was already over 450 years old. It's 1000th anniversary was in the reign of Elizabeth I.
  #4  
Old 05-23-2018, 07:18 AM
Philster Philster is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Location: Location:
Posts: 10,540
The last of the dinosaurs is closer to us in time than they are to the first of the dinosaurs.

.
  #5  
Old 05-23-2018, 07:53 AM
The Stainless Steel Rat The Stainless Steel Rat is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Close to the Saturn V
Posts: 8,658
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
__________________
Waking a person unnecessarily should not be considered a capital crime. For a first offense, that is.
**"The Notebooks of Lazarus Long"
  #6  
Old 05-23-2018, 08:51 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Near the GT eeehhhh...
Posts: 27,548
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
Surely you mean 'heavier-than-air'? The Montgolfier brothers' balloon flights were in the late 1700s.
__________________
Rigardu, kaj vi ekvidos.
Look, and you will begin to see.
  #7  
Old 05-23-2018, 08:52 AM
Malthus Malthus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 18,184
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenWyvern View Post
The oldest school in the world (probably) is King's School, Canterbury. It was founded in 597 AD.

At that time Saxon England was still pagan, but King Ethelbert of Kent converted to Christianity and allowed the foundation of a monastery and a kind of 'missionary school'. Tradition has it that a temple of Woden was re-purposed for the monks and their school. A large stone abbey was completed in 613, and the ruins still stand today next to the modern school.

When the Normans conquered England, it was already over 450 years old. It's 1000th anniversary was in the reign of Elizabeth I.
Speaking of Woden - last time I was in England, I saw a gigantic genealogical chart of the royal family, published recently and for sale to tourists ... at the bottom was the current Queen Elizabeth II and her offspring; at the top, the first ancestor of the first Saxon monarchs of England - "Wotan". He's still there!

http://www.medievalists.net/2012/11/...yal-genealogy/
  #8  
Old 05-23-2018, 08:57 AM
Jasmine Jasmine is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
This has my vote as "most amazing". Never in human history has there been so much change in such a short period of time. The difference between 1918 and 2018 is the kind of stuff that science fiction is made of.
__________________
"The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance -- it is the illusion of knowledge."
--Daniel J Boorstin
  #9  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:01 AM
EmilyG EmilyG is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Montreal
Posts: 8,077
Charles Darwin and Abraham Lincoln were born on the same day.
  #10  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:05 AM
The Stainless Steel Rat The Stainless Steel Rat is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Close to the Saturn V
Posts: 8,658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Surely you mean 'heavier-than-air'? The Montgolfier brothers' balloon flights were in the late 1700s.
Yeah, I gave two of my three brain cells the morning off..heavier than air is correct.
__________________
Waking a person unnecessarily should not be considered a capital crime. For a first offense, that is.
**"The Notebooks of Lazarus Long"
  #11  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:12 AM
Bayard Bayard is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 6,025
Thanks for starting this thread. I love these perception-challenging facts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
* Cleopatra, Mark Antony, Ceaser, and also Hannibal, Scipio etc are closer in time to the Neil Armstrong and tbe moon landing then they are to the building of the Pyramids.
When the Great Pyramid was being built, there were still woolly mammoths living in the Arctic.
  #12  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:20 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
No idea if this is the right forum, but hell.

* A well travelled man could have met Socrates, Confucius and Buddha.
.
I don't know if you're aware of it, but this is basically the idea in Gore Vidal's novel Creation

Quote:
The story follows the adventures of a fictional "Cyrus Spitama", an Achaemenid Persian diplomat of the 6th-5th century BCE who travels the known world comparing the political and religious beliefs of various empires of the time. Over the course of his life, he meets many influential philosophical figures of his time, including Zoroaster, Socrates, the Buddha, Mahavira, Lao Tsu, and Confucius.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creation_(novel)
__________________
"Mr. Chambers! Don't get on the ship! We translated the book, and it's a TENNIS MANUAL!"
  #13  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:21 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
I've reflected frequently that this was the case with both my grandmothers. (My grandfathers both died before 1970)
__________________
"Mr. Chambers! Don't get on the ship! We translated the book, and it's a TENNIS MANUAL!"
  #14  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:23 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Near the GT eeehhhh...
Posts: 27,548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
Speaking of Woden - last time I was in England, I saw a gigantic genealogical chart of the royal family, published recently and for sale to tourists ... at the bottom was the current Queen Elizabeth II and her offspring; at the top, the first ancestor of the first Saxon monarchs of England - "Wotan". He's still there!

http://www.medievalists.net/2012/11/...yal-genealogy/
It took a bit of digging, but I found it in Wikipedia. The Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies trace back to Woden via Cerdic, the founder of Wessex (but this seems to be disputed). Cerdic's descendant is ̣̉Alfred the Great, who is an ancestor of the current royal family.

So, the Queen of Canada, whose visage adorns the $20 banknote, is descended from Wotan (and there is a day named after this remote ancestor). This means that she is also related to Thor.

Last edited by Sunspace; 05-23-2018 at 09:24 AM.
  #15  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:38 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 14,265
I always thought it was interesting that Columbus discovered America and Magellan sailed around the world before Galileo was persecuted for his theories.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-23-2018 at 09:39 AM.
  #16  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:52 AM
blindboyard blindboyard is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Newark
Posts: 2,063
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyG View Post
Charles Darwin and Abraham Lincoln were born on the same day.
JFK and Aldous Huxley died on the same day.

In the year of the birth of Mohammad there was supposedly an attempted invasion of Mecca by a Christian army from Ethiopia. There's a church in Ethiopia, also, which claims to have the Ark of the Covenant.

In the Eighteenth Century the first Duke of Marlborough, a Churchill and the brother of one of Winston Churchill's ancestors, was given a small country in the Holy Roman Empire. He later swapped it for another country. The Duke's right hand man at the decisive battle of Bleheim was a Prince Eugene of Savoy. The Nazis named a heavy cruiser after him. His mother was banished from the French court due to a scandal involving witchcraft and love potions, and the French king refused to allow him into French service, before he fought against the French with the English.

Technically, the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies only contained one Sicily.

The founder of the Church of Scientology was part of a bizarre religious group run by the inventor of moulded fuel rockets, and referred to in FBI documents as "The Cult of Thelma".
__________________
This island is made mainly of coal and surrounded by fish. Only an organizing genius could produce a shortage of coal and fish at the same time.
-- Nye Bevan, Daily Herald, 25 May 1945
  #17  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:56 AM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 38,304
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I always thought it was interesting that Columbus discovered America and Magellan sailed around the world before Galileo was persecuted for his theories.
Not for "his theories", but for calling the Pope an ass.
__________________
Life ain't peaches and cream, but sometimes it's laughing your ass off when you have no ass. - WhyNot
  #18  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:57 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 14,265
The populations of Turkey and Iran are each now greater than the popultion of the USA when my father was born. The US population then doubled by the time I graduated from high school. It has doubled again since then.
  #19  
Old 05-23-2018, 09:59 AM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 25,033
Quote:
Originally Posted by blindboyard View Post
JFK and Aldous Huxley died on the same day.
As did C. S. Lewis.

And I think most people who are interested in historical trivia know this, but just in case anyone doesn't: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on the same day: the 50th anniversary of July 4, 1776.
  #20  
Old 05-23-2018, 10:02 AM
Hermitian Hermitian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,973
Quote:
Originally Posted by blindboyard View Post
JFK and Aldous Huxley died on the same day.
And C. S. Lewis!
  #21  
Old 05-23-2018, 10:05 AM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is online now
Nope! I said stop!
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: North Shore of LI
Posts: 18,852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmine View Post
This has my vote as "most amazing". Never in human history has there been so much change in such a short period of time. The difference between 1918 and 2018 is the kind of stuff that science fiction is made of.
My favorite example is that Laura Ingalls Wilder traveled west in a conastoga wagon and flew in an airplane before she died.
  #22  
Old 05-23-2018, 10:06 AM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,219
Ho Chi Minh at one time worked as a cook and dishwasher in Harlem. In Boston, he worked at the same bakery that Malcolm X worked at about 30 years later.

General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, victor at the Alamo, lived in Staten Island in New York after the Civil War for a time after being exiled from Mexico .

Last edited by Colibri; 05-23-2018 at 10:07 AM.
  #23  
Old 05-23-2018, 10:51 AM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,353
Lorenzo Da Ponte, who wrote the libretti for Mozart's operas The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Cosi fan tutte, later moved to New York, where he ran a grocery store. One of his New York friends was Clement Moore, author of "A Visit from St. Nicholas," who helped him get a job as a professor of Italian literature at Columbia University.
  #24  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:21 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,455
Karl Marx was a regular correspondent and contributor to the New York Daily Tribune

Jean Paul Marat, the French Revolutionary (famously assassinated in his bath by Charlotte Corday) was also a scientist. He independently discovered the use of shadowgraph imagery to detect and make visible air currents and convection, anticipating later Schlieren imagery. He once demonstrated it by showing colleagues the hot air rising from the head of Benjamin Franklin.

Speaking of Franklin, his illegitimate son William was the Royal Governor of New Jersey during the American Revolution (something I first learned from the play 1776)
__________________
"Mr. Chambers! Don't get on the ship! We translated the book, and it's a TENNIS MANUAL!"
  #25  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:32 AM
Walken After Midnight Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 3,806
In 1913, Adolf Hitler, Leon Trotsky, Joseph Stalin, Sigmund Freud and Joseph Tito all lived in the same place - Vienna.
  #26  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:37 AM
Max Torque Max Torque is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Raiderville, TX
Posts: 10,631
As of May 26, 2017, the U.S. was still paying one veteran's pension to a child of a veteran of the Civil War. Irene Triplett gets $73.13 every month. Cite.
  #27  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:40 AM
John Mace John Mace is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 83,486
I just want to say that "Bublical figure" is a great typo. We need a term for grandmothers in the Bible.
  #28  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:44 AM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 25,033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
In 1913, Adolf Hitler, Leon Trotsky, Joseph Stalin, Sigmund Freud and Joseph Tito all lived in the same place - Vienna.
At first I thought you meant they all lived together in the same apartment. Hey, I'd watch that sitcom!
  #29  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:51 AM
Walken After Midnight Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 3,806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
At first I thought you meant they all lived together in the same apartment. Hey, I'd watch that sitcom!
It would probably be a bit like The Young Ones.
  #30  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:53 AM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
It would probably be a bit like The Young Ones.
"Darling Fascist Bully Boy..."
  #31  
Old 05-23-2018, 12:10 PM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 11,542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
At first I thought you meant they all lived together in the same apartment. Hey, I'd watch that sitcom!
from the script:

Quote:
Stalin: "Adolf, how many times do I have to tell you: your dirty clothes are all over the lebensraum, and some are on MY side again! You cannot come over here without permission!"

Hitler: "Oh, I'll come over soon enough, just you wait and see!"

Freud: "Und vy does it bother you so much, Josef? Didn't your...mother used to handle your dirty laundry?"

Trotsky: <chuckles>

Stalin: "Leon! don't make me go upside your head!"
__________________
Sailboat
  #32  
Old 05-23-2018, 12:40 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,219
Sir Richard Francis Burton, the African explorer and aficionado of exotica (especially sexual), once met Brigham Young. He decided to visit Utah in 1860 because of his interest in polygamy.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-23-2018 at 12:41 PM.
  #33  
Old 05-23-2018, 12:53 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 76,939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, victor at the Alamo, lived in Staten Island in New York after the Civil War for a time after being exiled from Mexico .
Santa Anna also introduced modern chewing gum to the United States.
  #34  
Old 05-23-2018, 01:01 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 76,939
If you brought Abraham Lincoln back from the past to the modern world, he wouldn't know how to open a door.

The modern door knob is a surprisingly recent invention. It was patented in 1878.
  #35  
Old 05-23-2018, 01:08 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 18,184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
If you brought Abraham Lincoln back from the past to the modern world, he wouldn't know how to open a door.

The modern door knob is a surprisingly recent invention. It was patented in 1878.
On the other hand, indoor flush toilets (admittedly not with the modern mechanism) are surprisingly ancient: they have been found in the Indus Valley civilization, 2600-1900 BC.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanita...y_Civilisation
  #36  
Old 05-23-2018, 01:19 PM
AK84 AK84 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 14,634
The United States and the Holy Roman Empire co-existed for nearly 30 years.
Otto Frank (father of Anne) and Hitler were at the Somme in 1916.

In 2016, China became the worlds largest economy. It has been that for most of history.

When the British first came to India, what did they think of the Taj Mahal? Nothing, it had not been built yet and would not be for 50 years.
  #37  
Old 05-23-2018, 01:45 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 9,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
My grandfather (b. 1900) often remarked about this before his death in 1971.
  #38  
Old 05-23-2018, 01:48 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Sir Richard Francis Burton, the African explorer and aficionado of exotica (especially sexual), once met Brigham Young. He decided to visit Utah in 1860 because of his interest in polygamy.
That doesn't quite capture it -- Mormon polygamy was understandably a "hot" topic of discussion in Europe. Burton, who had written about Near Eastern polygamy, wanted to see how it compared. Having proposed to his future wife Isabel, Burton made the trip to Utah while awaiting her reply (!). When he got back after the trip, he wrote it up as the City of the Saints. It's a good read.

Burton had previously made the Pilgrimage to Mecca in the disguise of an Egyptian Muslim doctor. He wrote that trip up, too, as the two-volume Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Mekka and al-Medinah, which is also worth reading (although, of course, things have changed enormously since Burton's time)

When Burton got to Salt Lake City, he had a private audience with Brigham Young (both were world-famous figures, after all), and Young was rumored to have greeted Burton with the words "I understand you've done something like this before." A great story, but probably not true. Burton reports nothing like it in his book, although he does say he was impressed with Young and his knowledge.

Burton wasn't that impressed with a lot else, though. He regarded Truman Angell's Salt Lake Temple as an architectural monstrosity. (I like it, myself). He found Mormon polygamy to be dry and straitlaced compared to the practice in the Near East (exactly how he decided this, I don't know). His overall impression of Mormonism seemed to be (although he certainly didn't put it this way) It's No More Ridiculous Than Any Other Religion.

Burton gives a synopsis of the Book of Mormon in the footnotes of his book, along with a listing of all the pro- and anti-Mormon literature he'd read before and during his journey. he read a LOT of stuff.
__________________
"Mr. Chambers! Don't get on the ship! We translated the book, and it's a TENNIS MANUAL!"
  #39  
Old 05-23-2018, 01:52 PM
Hermitian Hermitian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,973
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK84 View Post

In 2016, China became the worlds largest economy. .
Cite? The IMF doesn't agree.
  #40  
Old 05-23-2018, 02:39 PM
Moris Moris is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Mediterranean shores
Posts: 116
The first skyscraper, Home Insurance Building in Chicago was finished in 1885.

Neuschwanstein Castle was finished in 1886.
  #41  
Old 05-23-2018, 02:54 PM
cochrane cochrane is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 20,332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
And I think most people who are interested in historical trivia know this, but just in case anyone doesn't: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on the same day: the 50th anniversary of July 4, 1776.
Jefferson died a few hours prior to Adams, but since the news hadn't yet traveled from Virginia, where Jefferson had died, to Massachusetts, where Adams had died, Adams' final words were, "Thomas Jefferson survives."
  #42  
Old 05-23-2018, 02:58 PM
Moris Moris is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Mediterranean shores
Posts: 116
One more:

During his pontificate (1099-1118), Pope Paschal II issued "Piae Postulatio Voluntatis", in which he officially recognized the existence of the Crusaders as an operative and militant part of the Catholic Church.

He also appointed Eiríkr Gnúpsson as a bishop of Greenland and Vinland. First American bishop.
  #43  
Old 05-23-2018, 03:03 PM
cochrane cochrane is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 20,332
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
My grandfather was born in 1902 and died in 1981, so his life spanned both events. He was even alive for the first test flights of the Space Shuttle Enterprise.
  #44  
Old 05-23-2018, 03:11 PM
cmkeller cmkeller is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: New York, NY, USA
Posts: 12,922
AK84:

Quote:
The earliest Bublical figure whose existance is attested is King Ahab, about 850 BC.
Maybe. David is (likely) mentioned in the Tel Dan Stele, although there are those who say the mention of "his house" is not proof of his existence as an individual, and there are also some who question that the inscription refers to that at all.

The writings of Procopius, a sixth-century Byzantine historian, speak of his having seen a marble column in Libya on which was inscribed that the residents were Canaanites who had fled from the Biblical Joshua. I don't know if a secondary source like that counts as "attesting" to.
__________________
"Sherlock Holmes once said that once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the answer. I, however, do not like to eliminate the impossible. The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it that the merely improbable lacks."
-- Douglas Adams's Dirk Gently, Holistic Detective
  #45  
Old 05-23-2018, 03:29 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,455
The only king of Israel of whom we have a contemporary image is Jehu

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehu

It's on the Obelisk of Shalmaneser
__________________
"Mr. Chambers! Don't get on the ship! We translated the book, and it's a TENNIS MANUAL!"

Last edited by CalMeacham; 05-23-2018 at 03:29 PM.
  #46  
Old 05-23-2018, 05:09 PM
cmkeller cmkeller is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: New York, NY, USA
Posts: 12,922
Not very surprising that there are almost no contemporary images of Jewish kings (and the one we have is from a non-Jewish source), given the Biblical prohibition against graven images. Granted, there was rampant idol-worship in Israel during much of that era, but very possibly people felt it was justified for (supposed) deities but not for self-aggrandizement.
__________________
"Sherlock Holmes once said that once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the answer. I, however, do not like to eliminate the impossible. The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it that the merely improbable lacks."
-- Douglas Adams's Dirk Gently, Holistic Detective
  #47  
Old 05-23-2018, 05:46 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 39,219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
Santa Anna also introduced modern chewing gum to the United States.
Chewing it gave him something to do in Staten Island.
  #48  
Old 05-23-2018, 06:18 PM
steatopygia steatopygia is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: North Idaho mostly
Posts: 1,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAtoz View Post
"Darling Fascist Bully Boy..."
"Dear Darling Fascist Bully Boy..."
  #49  
Old 05-23-2018, 07:39 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 25,729
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmine View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Not sure if it's an oddity, but: A person born in 1902 who died in 1970 was born before the first lighter-than-aircraft flight and died after a man walked on the moon.
This has my vote as "most amazing". Never in human history has there been so much change in such a short period of time. The difference between 1918 and 2018 is the kind of stuff that science fiction is made of.
I think the more dramatic changes started about two hundred years ago. From the beginning of human history to that date, all machinery was dependent on muscle power (human or animal) or maybe water or wind power. And the only lighting was fire (and really the only source of heat as well).

Today many, many people have no experience with horses or know how to build a fire. Your ancestors would have found that unimaginable.
  #50  
Old 05-23-2018, 07:50 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 76,939
The famous painting of Washington Crossing the Delaware depicts two future Presidents. The officer holding the flag behind George Washington is James Monroe, who was one of Washington's aides during the war.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 05-23-2018 at 07:50 PM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:15 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017