Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-20-2018, 12:22 AM
golffan1963 golffan1963 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 130
What Is the Most Important Invention In Human History?

Wasn't sure where to put this thread....but since inventions are the product of human creativity, I decided here. If it needs to be moved so be it. I also hope it hasn't been asked before. In addition, I considered a poll, but was more interested in detailed answers.

Anyway the questions stands....is it the wheel? Mass Production? Gun Powder? The airplane or automobile? How about the telephone...or the computer? Or the microchip? Discoveries of things such as fire and electricity don't count.

Given my screen name, my first inclination is to say the golf club, but I don't think that would fly.

Have fun....
  #2  
Old 06-20-2018, 12:26 AM
Measure for Measure Measure for Measure is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Twitter: @MeasureMeasure
Posts: 13,433
Over the past 200 years, I'd say the electric generator.

Over human history, I'd propose the first weapon, the club followed by the 2nd weapon, the spear. Or maybe the axe.
  #3  
Old 06-20-2018, 12:32 AM
Velocity Velocity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 11,889
Do antibiotics and anesthesia count as discoveries?

If so, then I'd go with nuclear energy, and nuclear weapons in particular. Not "important" in the good sense, necessarily, but it doesn't have to be good to be important.
  #4  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:18 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: beautiful Idaho
Posts: 2,367
I propose the transistor.
__________________
It's too late.
  #5  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:21 AM
guizot guizot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 7,936
We should consider the printing press, too.
  #6  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:27 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Where the wild roses grow
Posts: 24,037
The telephone.
  #7  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:28 AM
snfaulkner snfaulkner is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: 123 Fake Street
Posts: 6,313
Without a hint of a doubt, by far the best thing to have ever been invented in the history of humankind, and in fact in time and space all throughout the entire universe and every species to have ever live is unquestionably hyperbole.
  #8  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:48 AM
kk fusion kk fusion is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 426
Positional number systems and logarithms, if that fits your criteria.
  #9  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:50 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 16,963
Alcohol. So important, it drove the foundation of civilization itself !
__________________
--- ---
I'm not sure how to respond to this, but that's never stopped me before.
  #10  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:52 AM
Temporary Name Temporary Name is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 232
I remember some genus or influential thinker saying the pencil about twenty years ago (which I dismissed at the time). Without doubt the ability to extend memory through literacy and the use of numbers—which freed the mind to consider more abstract thoughts (which were also subsequently recorded) is the most significant technology to affect human development.

Many inventions already mentioned in this thread are extensions of basic literacy: computers, printing press, maybe transistors depending on how they were used. Sound recordings, photographs and moving pictures are storage devices that make memories more available --- and actually make some memories possible without experiencing them first hand (a video of your daughter’s wedding or your grandson’s graduation make the experience a visual reality to bedridden relative). In addition written music and recorded music also extend the memory and shared experience of humankind. (Note: I am not sure if a case can be made that universal broadcasts of global events like the Olympics or war coverage can be counted as an extension of simple reading n writing- but at least to some degree they are the same concept on a grand scale and instantaneously realized. Everything else mentioned here IS an extension of using written symbols to extend memory.)

Full disclosure, this is not my original thought. This entire idea was taken from Daniel Levitin’s book THE ORGANIZED MIND, or extrapolated from same.

Last edited by Temporary Name; 06-20-2018 at 01:54 AM.
  #11  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:53 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: beautiful Idaho
Posts: 2,367
I suggested the transistor but maybe pornography is more important.
__________________
It's too late.
  #12  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:57 AM
snfaulkner snfaulkner is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: 123 Fake Street
Posts: 6,313
Quote:
Originally Posted by Channing Idaho Banks View Post
I suggested the transistor but maybe pornography is more important.
FREE porn over broadband, to be specific.
  #13  
Old 06-20-2018, 02:07 AM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: republic of california
Posts: 5,468
Books
__________________
Just another outlying data point on the bell curve of life
  #14  
Old 06-20-2018, 02:31 AM
Temporary Name Temporary Name is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 232
While I typed my response above that became post number 10, the number of posts doubled; a testament to the social networks and all electronic communication, computation, and immediacy. But I have two further answers which I believe trump all high tech answers to this question.

The first is pretty high tech itself. Living in the American southwest, I am well aware that air conditioning is the BEST if not most important development mankind has ever conceived.

But in reality, the technologies we take for granted are easily the greatest and best advances of history. Irrigation, dams, food production through money crops, vaccines, and so many other basic things that many a hundred and a hundred and fifty years ago had a grasp of are so far removed from everyday life they are dismissed. If the entire Straightdope community lived on a seaport coast, and all manufacturing, and electronic information services were destroyed by a comet strike or nuclear winter. . . . . could any of us build a boat to sail to another continent? If we could, would any of us know how to use only the power of wind to pilot us to safety across a sea? Could we feed ourselves while we grew crops for next year? Could we build buildings substantial enough to keep ourselves safe through a winter? I mean without a lumberyard or home improvement store. Would we be able to defend ourselves from other groups determined to take what we have and kill us all? Could we possibly build a simple mill powered by a waterwheel (assuming running water)?

My point is that before any advanced technology is of any use these very basic needs MUST be met. Would we even be capable of removing our own waste products so they do not contaminate the supply of food and water? With only what we find, can we provide any level of medical care for ourselves? Make clothing from scratch? Anyone know how to run a spinning loom assuming one of us could build it? In an agrarian society sans electricity, what use is a transistor, computer, or printing press?
  #15  
Old 06-20-2018, 02:35 AM
Temporary Name Temporary Name is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by outlierrn View Post
Books
A very good answer, and much more concise than my own.
  #16  
Old 06-20-2018, 02:57 AM
Sage Rat Sage Rat is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Howdy
Posts: 19,598
Paper (but I'll go along with books and the printing press).

The ability for tinkerers and scientists to swap ideas and run peer reviews on each other gave us the scientific method and all of the other inventions. And minus those inventions, you may have never had the population density to allow a large number of tinkerers and scientists to all inhabit the same city at the same time and do so even more efficiently than through swapping manuscripts.

It also brought us humanism, democracy, meritocracy, etc.

Last edited by Sage Rat; 06-20-2018 at 02:58 AM.
  #17  
Old 06-20-2018, 03:02 AM
Temporary Name Temporary Name is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 232
It occurs to me possibly a code of justice, and the formal statement of human rights might be the best “invention of all time”. Perhaps the documentation of a civil government based on fairness and justice for all people. Granted that is easier when your society is small and perhaps all related to each other, but when applied to all humankind quite a noble significant achievement.
  #18  
Old 06-20-2018, 03:53 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 38,885
The TV remote.
  #19  
Old 06-20-2018, 04:38 AM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Ohio
Posts: 10,801
There are some "invisible" things we take for granted - every day - that make our lives so much better.

At the top of the list I would have to put vaccines. Your life would be very, very different without vaccines.

Another is our modern sewage system. You don't see it, because it is mostly underground. Visit a country that doesn't have a sewage system, however, and you will no longer take it for granted.
  #20  
Old 06-20-2018, 04:53 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 9,803
Clearly the answer is Venetian blinds.







Without them, it would be curtains for all of us.


mmm
  #21  
Old 06-20-2018, 05:10 AM
wintertime wintertime is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 940
Math.

[Unless you follow some variant of Platonic theory which defines it as a discoverable system.]

Added:
I wanted to say "fiction" at first, but inventing stuff in our heads is so much us that it's part of our nature.

Last edited by wintertime; 06-20-2018 at 05:12 AM.
  #22  
Old 06-20-2018, 05:14 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 16,963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Clearly the answer is Venetian blinds.

Without them, it would be curtains for all of us.
mmm

I don't know who you are. I don't know what you want. If you are looking for chuckles, I can tell you I don't have any. But what I do have are a very particular set of skills, skills I have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make me a nightmare for people like you. If you quit punning right now, that'll be the end of it. I will not look for you, I will not pursue you. But if you don't, I will look for you, I will find you, and I will hurt you.


__________________
--- ---
I'm not sure how to respond to this, but that's never stopped me before.
  #23  
Old 06-20-2018, 05:30 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 22,897
Writing. The answer is writing.
  #24  
Old 06-20-2018, 05:33 AM
kayT kayT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Austin
Posts: 4,810
Chocolate.
  #25  
Old 06-20-2018, 05:33 AM
wintertime wintertime is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 940
Well, I'll stand by my first answer, math, looking into the future; but for the past, I might go with religion, if "most important" equals most influential.
  #26  
Old 06-20-2018, 06:23 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
Friend of Cecil
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Flavortown
Posts: 35,099
Sewers.
  #27  
Old 06-20-2018, 06:27 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Where the wild roses grow
Posts: 24,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Clearly the answer is Venetian blinds
Bloody hell. Ignoring the lame Dad joke, there is nothing lower on the list of important inventions than bloody venetian effing blinds.
  #28  
Old 06-20-2018, 06:36 AM
septimus septimus is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Land of Smiles
Posts: 16,449
The printing press and resultant mass-produced books propelled the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, but written language and paper were also prerequisites for books. So, if threesomes are not frowned on, I'll go with {written language, paper, movable-type printing press}.

Last edited by septimus; 06-20-2018 at 06:37 AM.
  #29  
Old 06-20-2018, 06:42 AM
elbows elbows is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: London, Ontario
Posts: 13,540
Poop management, for both humans and the animals they keep.

We didn’t have to keep moving along once we began to manage our poop better, we could set down roots!

Discovering we ought not live among the dung of our animals would be of equal importance, I should think.

I feel these two things might be instrumental in all the developments that followed.
  #30  
Old 06-20-2018, 06:54 AM
iiandyiiii iiandyiiii is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 29,482
If spoken language qualifies, it was surely the most important invention, IMO.
  #31  
Old 06-20-2018, 07:32 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 77,479
[Moderating]

Invention might be creativity, but it's not art. IMHO would be a better fit. Moving.

[Not moderating]

Language is by far the most important, followed by writing. Language transformed the capacity for human thought from a single brain to a whole tribe's worth of brains. Writing transformed it from a tribe's worth of brains to the collective brains of all humans, past and present. Further, both enabled other inventions, not only to be developed, but to last: Without language and writing, an invention could be developed, but then lost, with the death of the inventor or es tribe. With them, inventions persist indefinitely.
  #32  
Old 06-20-2018, 07:46 AM
Jasmine Jasmine is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 894
I think the Gutenberg Printing Press deserves strong consideration. However, human history is (hopefully) ongoing, so the most important invention/discovery may yet await us. Ultimately, it may be a Quantum Theory of Gravity that will allow us to manipulate and direct gravity so as to produce a form of propulsion that will allow us to truly expand into space on a major scale.
__________________
"The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance -- it is the illusion of knowledge."
--Daniel J Boorstin
  #33  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:07 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 28,354
I'd say agriculture. Up until some time in either the late 19th or early 20th century, the winners of conflicts were usually the ones with the most population under a cohesive society, and even up until the present it still works that way a lot of the time. You need food to feed your population. The exceptions are horse archer armies who could only operate well in places where they had a lot of naturally growing grass so they could feed their horses while on the go.

The Native Americans didn't get pushed off their land due to inferior technology, they got pushed off due to sheer numbers. The guns and cannons of Europe didn't mean anything since the northern native americans were much better warriors per capita even with just their arrows and whatever firearms they could buy. (The central and southern native empires were taken over because they were not united.)
  #34  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:13 AM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 9,965
You know I just am not going to be able to avoid a Heinlein quote, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert A. Heinlein, Tunnel in the Sky
The greatest creation of mankind is government. It is also the hardest of all. More individualistic than cats, nevertheless we have learned to cooperate more efficiently than ants or bees or termites. Wilder, bloodier, and more deadly than sharks, we have learned to live together as peacefully as lambs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert A. Heinlein, Podkayne of Mars
Politics is not evil; politics is the human race's most magnificent achievement. When politics is good, it's wonderful and when politics is bad -- well, it's still pretty good. Politics is just a name for the way we get things done ... without fighting. We dicker and compromise and everybody thinks he has received a raw deal, but somehow after a tedious amount of talk we come up with some jury-rigged way to do it without getting anybody's head bashed in. That's politics. The only other way to settle a dispute is by bashing a few heads in ... and that is what happens when one or both sides is no longer willing to dicker. That's why I say politics is good even when it is bad because the only alternative is force- and somebody gets hurt.

He makes a good case.

Last edited by BrotherCadfael; 06-20-2018 at 08:15 AM.
  #35  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:14 AM
roys roys is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: US
Posts: 11
From pioneering inventions to bold scientific and medical advancements, find out more about 11 innovations that changed the course of human history.
The Printing Press. Library of Congress. ...
The Compass. DNY59/iStockphoto.com. ...
Paper Currency. ...
Steel. ...
The Electric Light. ...
Domestication of the Horse. ...
Transistors. ...
The Telegraph.
  #36  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:18 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 47,806
One that hasn't been mentioned yet is the clock. Suddenly, we had a mechanical way to gauge time, and lives are run by it.

But nothing took lives over faster and more completely than our modern computers.
  #37  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:27 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 77,479
Yup, politics is important, all right, but it's impossible without language.
  #38  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:33 AM
WotNot WotNot is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Northumbria
Posts: 2,724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Measure for Measure View Post
Over human history, I'd propose the first weapon, the club followed by the 2nd weapon, the spear. Or maybe the axe.
Those all pre-date modern humans, though, don’t they? I’m inclined to disqualify them on that basis.

I’m going to vote for string, which doesn’t get nearly enough credit, in my opinion.
  #39  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:47 AM
Turble Turble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 2,139
The horse collar – the increase in agricultural output freed many people from subsistence farming which brought about the beginnings of modern society.

Last edited by Turble; 06-20-2018 at 08:47 AM.
  #40  
Old 06-20-2018, 08:48 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,571
The Fish Weir



You can talk about your modern inventions and how world-changing they were, but the Fish Weir is an extremely simple bit of invention* that works flawlessly and fed uncountable numbers of people for thousands of years with minimal effort. In Back Bay Boston a fish weir dates back up to 5,700 years ago, and was still used in colonial days.

Nowadays, rivers are too polluted, and there are too many people. But for a huge chunk of human history these passive fish-catching devices fed huge numbers of people. And with no moving parts.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_weir
__________________
"Mr. Chambers! Don't get on the ship! We translated the book, and it's a TENNIS MANUAL!"
  #41  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:03 AM
Icarus Icarus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: In front of my PC, y tu?
Posts: 4,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
I'd say agriculture. Up until some time in either the late 19th or early 20th century, the winners of conflicts were usually the ones with the most population under a cohesive society, and even up until the present it still works that way a lot of the time. You need food to feed your population.
I'm going with this - with agriculture, nomadic cultures stayed put, food production created surpluses, which allowed for individuals to diversify their labor (from hunting and gathering), populations expanded which precipitated the formation of organized leadership, etc. etc..........which all eventually led to Porn on your iPhone!

Regarding writing - even nomadic cultures had some form of memory recording through marks on a stone or beads on a string, supplemented with oral references. So that to me is a form of "writing". But we would all still be nomadic hunter gatherers without agriculture.
__________________
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.
- C. Darwin
  #42  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:04 AM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 12,524
All good ideas. I was going to suggest the printing press, but got beaten to it.

I'll throw out another important, but I don't thing the most important invention. - Accurate, transportable clocks. The makes exploration/travel much easier. It allows travelers to calculated their longitude.
__________________
I don't live in the middle of nowhere, but I can see it from here.
  #43  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:12 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 38,885
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
The Fish Weir



You can talk about your modern inventions and how world-changing they were, but the Fish Weir is an extremely simple bit of invention* that works flawlessly and fed uncountable numbers of people for thousands of years with minimal effort. In Back Bay Boston a fish weir dates back up to 5,700 years ago, and was still used in colonial days.
Along these lines I'll add textiles. They may have first have appeared in making nets for hunting and fishing. Certainly the earliest textiles were not tightly woven cloth, possibly to make small cargo nets to carry items, but I think the scale may have increased with knotting before the development of weaving.

IMHO these kind of hunting devices were the precursors of agriculture, instead of hunting animals individually, instead of seeking the largest animals as a means of hunting efficiency, the mass gathering of smaller fare would have been a step toward domesticating animals and farming. Hunting by beating the ground using all members of a community would improve greatly by driving the game into nets instead of relying on individual captures via hands, pointy stick, rock, or blunt stick.
  #44  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:13 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Great White North
Posts: 4,131
Another vote for the printing press.

Almost every doc I've seen has had in in the top 3, if not #1.
It ushered us into the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions and the Information Age we live in today.
  #45  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:15 AM
Terminus Est Terminus Est is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: The tropics
Posts: 7,046
Agriculture made civilization possible, and all the other inventions necessary.
  #46  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:18 AM
WotNot WotNot is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Northumbria
Posts: 2,724
Quote:
Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
Along these lines I'll add textiles. They may have first have appeared in making nets for hunting and fishing. Certainly the earliest textiles were not tightly woven cloth, possibly to make small cargo nets to carry items, but I think the scale may have increased with knotting before the development of weaving.

IMHO these kind of hunting devices were the precursors of agriculture, instead of hunting animals individually, instead of seeking the largest animals as a means of hunting efficiency, the mass gathering of smaller fare would have been a step toward domesticating animals and farming. Hunting by beating the ground using all members of a community would improve greatly by driving the game into nets instead of relying on individual captures via hands, pointy stick, rock, or blunt stick.
You don’t have any of that unless you invent string first, though, do you?
  #47  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:39 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 38,885
Quote:
Originally Posted by WotNot View Post
You don’t have any of that unless you invent string first, though, do you?
You could use vines and strips of leather, but yes, the development of long fiber production is a basic part of textiles. I was pointing out more about how weirs and nets may have helped pave the path toward agriculture, and agriculture is pretty important considering how humans may never have survived in large populations without it, and technology would be largely limited by what you could carry with you. And as I mentioned, textiles increased the carrying capacity of people.

Last edited by TriPolar; 06-20-2018 at 09:40 AM.
  #48  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:40 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 14,329
Plastic.
  #49  
Old 06-20-2018, 10:02 AM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 8,026
Language.

Anything else mentioned on this list is 100% rendered moot if we couldn't communicate with each other to make it happen. Yes, even math.
__________________
Want to see more of my adventures in Orlando? Follow Mrs. Cups and me @theorlandoduo on Instagram
  #50  
Old 06-20-2018, 10:51 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: beautiful Idaho
Posts: 2,367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
One that hasn't been mentioned yet is the clock. Suddenly, we had a mechanical way to gauge time, and lives are run by it.

But nothing took lives over faster and more completely than our modern computers.
clocks had already been invented but the most important part of clock inventions was to make one that kept accurate time on the Seas. This was necessary for accurate navigation, not for getting to work.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:27 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017