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Old 09-03-2018, 07:08 AM
Blalron Blalron is offline
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How difficult would it be to disappear today in the USA?

Let's say you want to intentionally leave all your friends and family behind, and start a new life under a new name without anyone being able to track you down. How difficult would that be to accomplish?
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Old 09-03-2018, 07:24 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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Changing your name is the hardest part. We had a local guy who left his family/friends with no notice. He moved about 1000 miles away and someone spotted him. He came back and got divorced and then left again to go back where he was staying. He went from NC to the gulf coast where he worked as a fishing guide.
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Old 09-03-2018, 08:11 AM
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It's the electronics that get you. You would need to go off-grid completely: No bank, no credit card, work in the 'black' economy for cash etc.

If your friends and family aren't going to put too much effort (money) into looking for you, it wouldn't be hard at all - just move to a big city somewhere and change your appearance a little.
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Old 09-03-2018, 08:12 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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We have illegal aliens that seem to find new social security numbers but those are often flagged down later on. It kind of depends upon what kind of checks your employer makes.

Certain jobs like in banking or working for the government, they check out your background pretty well. Other jobs you could probably get away with it.

Then their are also the people who work under the table, cash only.
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Old 09-03-2018, 08:39 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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for a new name, it used to be that people would take on the identity of a person who died as a baby. That way the person had no records beyond just birth and death. That might still be possible now but probably not as easy as it was in the past. I don't know if a background check looks into death records, I assume they don't but maybe some do check that via Social security death index.
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:05 AM
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There's a difference between officially changing your name, and just calling yourself something different. You can go by any name you like, as long as it's not done with the intent to defraud.
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:09 AM
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Books have been written about it.

It's difficult, but not impossible. And it's a lot of work.
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Old 09-03-2018, 11:15 AM
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I am pretty invisible. I don't exactly live off-grid. Though we are out there. I think I could disappear for a lengthy spell and no one would notice. But I like my comfort, amenities and life preserving insulin too much.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 09-03-2018 at 11:15 AM.
  #9  
Old 09-03-2018, 11:36 AM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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for a new name, it used to be that people would take on the identity of a person who died as a baby. That way the person had no records beyond just birth and death. That might still be possible now but probably not as easy as it was in the past. I don't know if a background check looks into death records, I assume they don't but maybe some do check that via Social security death index.
I remember reading some years ago that the Social Security Administration started asking for evidence of existence beyond infancy, school records and such, before issuing a number.
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Old 09-03-2018, 11:47 AM
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I'm not sure how that would work then, because if a family is getting any sort of assistance (Medicaid, food stamps, TANF, housing assistance, etc.) and a new baby comes into the family they have to get an SSN right off the bat.
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Old 09-03-2018, 12:55 PM
JRDelirious JRDelirious is offline
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There is disappearing/going off grid/cutting off with the past, and there's changing identity. The first part is highly dependent on how motivated are the other people to find you and drag you back (and why) but does not require you to do anything subrepticious. It just becomes a test of who's more hassle-tolerant.

RE: Social Security Numbers, it has been only since the late 80s/c. 1990, that SSNs really became de-facto required from birth, due to revisions to the tax code and other laws mandating a SSN to make claims for a dependent child. Many Boomers and even some older GenXers only got theirs in their teens, when they were about to encounter on-the-books employment and/or college applications; I could be enrolled in school without one. So for a long time there were coexisting in the same cohort people who got their SSN from childhood and others who did not until they were ready for the workforce. Now after 30 years, though, the SSA will want to know what took you so long.

Last edited by JRDelirious; 09-03-2018 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 09-03-2018, 01:28 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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I got my SSN around age 14 in the 70s. Now kids get them at birth at least since the early 90s.

Last edited by Bijou Drains; 09-03-2018 at 01:28 PM.
  #13  
Old 09-03-2018, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Bijou Drains View Post
for a new name, it used to be that people would take on the identity of a person who died as a baby. That way the person had no records beyond just birth and death. That might still be possible now but probably not as easy as it was in the past. I don't know if a background check looks into death records, I assume they don't but maybe some do check that via Social security death index.
Well, background checks of deaths wouldn't be the problem--at least that wasn't the case when that technique was used. The technique (called "paper tripping") was possible up until the 1990s or so. It started by first finding the death certificate of the infant (who, at that time, usually wouldn't have an SSN at such a young age), and then using the information from the death certificate to get the birth certificate. From there, you apply for a Social Security card, state ID card, etc. When I was in high school (the 80s), I was actually able to do this. It wasn't just used by people who wanted to "disappear." Foreign agents were using it, so the feds eventually started to work with local agencies to make it too difficult or risky to try.

Now, as mentioned above, most hospitals strongly encourage people to give newborns an SSN, and if the baby dies, that number appears as "deceased" in many databases, so it can't be used to get other ID. Before, the paper tripper could assume that an infant didn't have an SNN, and apply for one. Today, even if you could find a baby that died without an SNN, it's pretty suspicious for an adult to be applying for an SNN today, and could lead to discovery. Additionally, many counties instituted the practice of cross referencing births and deaths. If a baby dies in the same county, they go back and mark the birth certificate as "deceased," so it's no good. Also, now, many county registrars won't give out a birth or death certificate copy to just anyone, the way they used to. You have to be the person in question (for a birth certificate), or have some relationship to the person to get those documents.
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I remember reading some years ago that the Social Security Administration started asking for evidence of existence beyond infancy, school records and such, before issuing a number.
That could be. It would make sense. And, as mentioned above, anyone 18 or older applying for a new SSN might be asked to have some explanation for why they hadn't gotten one earlier. At the very least it would call attention.

Last edited by guizot; 09-03-2018 at 04:01 PM.
  #14  
Old 09-03-2018, 04:20 PM
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This thread needs a "Need answer fast"
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Old 09-03-2018, 04:54 PM
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Making a passable birth certificate shouldn't be too difficult to counterfeit. Using a computer scanner to change the name, DOB and such on your real birth certificate, then print out the final copy on official looking safety paper that certified copies come on. An embossed state seal can be purchased online.

Make 2 copies. One could have a recent date of birth so you could apply for a social security card for your "newly born infant". That would eliminate the suspicion of an adult applying for one. SS cards have no DOB so once you have the card nobody else would know it was issued for an infant. Then using that card and the birth certificate get a drivers license. Then a local store charge card in the new name. Then a library card. Voila. You've created a new person out of thin air. Now vanish.
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Old 09-03-2018, 04:54 PM
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Given the increasing electronic coverage of your existence, including easy database checking of social security numbers, school records etc, would it be easier to adopt someone else's identity and rely on their online presence, rather than trying to create one of your own from scratch?

And a supplementary, would it be hard to be their doppelganger, provided you made sure your paths never crossed?
  #17  
Old 09-03-2018, 05:09 PM
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The tax reform that made it mandatory to report SSNs of dependents was done in 1986. I was born in 1981, but already had a SSN because my father bought some savings bonds in my name. At least, that's what my mother said when I questioned her as to why my original SSN was found in an envelope addressed to the place I lived between birth and 1984 (and not the place I lived in 1986) when I found out just when SSNs were required for dependents on tax returns.
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Old 09-03-2018, 05:38 PM
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Given the increasing electronic coverage of your existence, including easy database checking of social security numbers, school records etc, would it be easier to adopt someone else's identity and rely on their online presence, rather than trying to create one of your own from scratch?
I think that would trip someone up real quick. It would be extremely difficult to get documents in their name, and if you did get them to stay undetected about it.

It would be easier to fall off the radar by making up your own person and continuing life as that.

If people are looking for "you" they aren't going to find "you" if "you" aren't "you" anymore. If I'm looking for Joe Blow but he's now living a completely different life somewhere else as Clint Taurus, I'm not going to find him. Taking over someone elses identity, living or dead, isn't a viable plan in the 21st century.
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  #19  
Old 09-03-2018, 05:52 PM
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Making a passable birth certificate shouldn't be too difficult to counterfeit. Using a computer scanner to change the name, DOB and such on your real birth certificate, then print out the final copy on official looking safety paper that certified copies come on. An embossed state seal can be purchased online.

Make 2 copies. One could have a recent date of birth so you could apply for a social security card for your "newly born infant". That would eliminate the suspicion of an adult applying for one. SS cards have no DOB so once you have the card nobody else would know it was issued for an infant. Then using that card and the birth certificate get a drivers license. Then a local store charge card in the new name. Then a library card. Voila. You've created a new person out of thin air. Now vanish.
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Let's not provide detailed advice on how to break the law or forge documents.

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Old 09-03-2018, 06:14 PM
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If someone was really dedicated to disappearing, would the best course of action to go overseas, renounce their United States citizenship, and then proceed to a country that would be more lax in providing ID documents?
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Old 09-03-2018, 06:53 PM
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Moderating

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I meant to add "don't try this at home"
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  #22  
Old 09-03-2018, 07:29 PM
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I like my comfort, amenities and life preserving insulin too much.
[hijack]Don't get too attached to your insulin.

High cost of insulin is lethal for some

I worry most about the type I patients. No amount of diet/exercise can ever eliminate their absolute need for insulin. [/hijack]
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Old 09-03-2018, 07:47 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is offline
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[hijack]Don't get too attached to your insulin.

High cost of insulin is lethal for some

I worry most about the type I patients. No amount of diet/exercise can ever eliminate their absolute need for insulin. [/hijack]
Is insulin the kind of drug you can buy from overseas and it still be good or is the shipping requirement too onerous?

I heard about this story, I thought I heard someone on NPR claim that in El Salvador you could buy a vial of the same insulin for $10.

I know walmart has cheap insulin, but I've heard that is nowhere near as good as the newer brands. But I honestly don't know much about how it works.
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Old 09-03-2018, 11:55 PM
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Just witness a mob hit and agree to testify in exchange for being put in the witness protection program.

Alternately, become an accountant for the mob and then turn state's evidence for the same deal.
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Old 09-04-2018, 12:10 AM
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Isn't this why some people move to Thailand?

I've heard that Ecuador is another newer place for people who wish to "disappear".
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Old 09-04-2018, 02:25 AM
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It really depends on who wants to find you and if it’s the government or not, or if the people looking for you can obtain government records, legally or otherwise.

In the US, my current contact contact information is probably only recorded by Customs and the IRS, as well as a few financial institutions. None of these should give that information out, but I suppose there are illegal methods of finding out. However, ordinary people would not likely know even how to obtain that illegally.
  #27  
Old 09-04-2018, 08:35 AM
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Then using that card and the birth certificate get a drivers license. . .
I'm pretty sure the DMV (well, at least in CA, and probably everywhere now) has access to the SSN database--they use it to check name spelling--and would see the age (DOB) discrepancy.

Also, many (most?) DMVs would take your your fingerprint, and conceivably find a match if you already have gotten an ID with your true identity.
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Old 09-04-2018, 09:54 AM
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Also, many (most?) DMVs would take your your fingerprint, and conceivably find a match if you already have gotten an ID with your true identity.
Not in Illinois -- at least, not on renewals. I first got an Illinois DL when I moved here from Wisconsin in 1989, and they didn't take fingerprints then, and I've never been asked for them on a renewal since.

I have no idea if they now take fingerprints for a first-time license applicant in Illinois, but I think I'd be surprised if they did.
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Old 09-04-2018, 10:00 AM
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I think it would be easier for an illegal alien to "disappear" than a citizen because he was never here in the first place. He'd be entering the country under the radar and would have to just remain there. A citizen, on the other hand, would have to drop off the radar, which would be much more difficult because he would already be established in a gazillion different data bases.
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  #30  
Old 09-04-2018, 06:03 PM
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I'm pretty sure the DMV (well, at least in CA, and probably everywhere now) has access to the SSN database--they use it to check name spelling--and would see the age (DOB) discrepancy.

Also, many (most?) DMVs would take your your fingerprint, and conceivably find a match if you already have gotten an ID with your true identity.

You think with the zillions of DL applicants every year DMV's are cross referencing that much? Unless there is a red flag, I doubt it. A person with a SS card, birth certificate, and maybe a local college ID card with a picture on it probably wouldn't raise much suspicion.

Getting their first driver license at 50 seems suspicious to me, though. But there are people who have never drove during ther adult life I suppose.

And a lot of state driver license agencies are not using finger prints. My state of Wisconsin doesn't.

What they do use, however, is facial recognition software. So if one tries to get a license and they already have one in another name it's going to come up. or if one tries to get a license in the name of someone else it's going to come up.

If it were me I'd get a license in one of the 3-4 states that isn't a member of the national drivers compact. That might lower the risk of getting tripped up.

Of course, all this is illegal and I hope mentioning it doesn't violate my Mod warning. But it's kind of hard to not mention illegal things when talking about such a subject.
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Last edited by pkbites; 09-04-2018 at 06:05 PM.
  #31  
Old 09-04-2018, 06:11 PM
HurricaneDitka HurricaneDitka is offline
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Let's say you want to intentionally leave all your friends and family behind, and start a new life under a new name without anyone being able to track you down. How difficult would that be to accomplish?
If you didn't mind your new life being that of a vagrant, it would be extremely easy:

1) Catch a bus to some other city
2) Start begging
3) ???
4) Profit

If you get arrested or asked by anyone, tell them that you are (insert fictional name here) and you don't have ID. There's probably some federally-funded agency or NGO that'll even help you obtain an ID for the fictional new you.

If you want to live a nice, comfortable life where you have a stable job, bank accounts, can travel overseas, etc, it gets a lot more complicated.

ETA: have you ever submitted fingerprints for a background check or anything?

Last edited by HurricaneDitka; 09-04-2018 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:10 PM
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I wouldn't fancy my chances of not running into people I know. 3 instances: I drove east and we were going to see some people. On the way to their house, we saw them walking up the street. This was in the middle of Sydney, not podunk junction, nowheresville. I flew to London. First person I noticed was somebody from "back home". Went to a youth hostel in Scotland, met some people. Later went back to London and went to a concert at the Royal Albert Hall. Sitting next to me were the people I'd met in Scotland. Another instance from a friend at the youth hostel I was staying at in London. She went to Berlin, and ran into the guys who ran the London hostel.
I think you'd need to stay indoors if you didn't want to run into somebody from your former place of residence.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:29 PM
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Is insulin the kind of drug you can buy from overseas and it still be good or is the shipping requirement too onerous?
MIght be as good, might be stored improperly, too old, etc.

Quote:
I heard about this story, I thought I heard someone on NPR claim that in El Salvador you could buy a vial of the same insulin for $10.
Pretty much true. The same drugs are sold for much less in other countries than they are in the US.

Quote:
I know walmart has cheap insulin, but I've heard that is nowhere near as good as the newer brands. But I honestly don't know much about how it works.
Walmart insulin is perfectly fine and effective. I don't know why anyone would claim it's nowhere near as good. It's the same version of Regular and NPH that's been used for decades to treat insulin and help diabetics.

Now the Walmart NPH won't be the fancy long-acting insulins like Lantus, purported to last for 24 hours or more (but not found to be particularly more effective than NPH, tho it was until recently priced to be 10 x more expensive).

Nor will the Walmart Regular be the ultra-fast acting insulins like the novologs and humalogs. Which can be more convenient for some diabetics in some cases. Again, at 10+ x the cost of good old Regular.

But it's getting harder and harder for diabetics to get access to the low priced versions anymore. For one thing, the prices are getting jacked up by a LOT of manufacturers of these versions. For another, some health care systems (like those in prisons) are no longer allowed by Walmart and similar discount retailers to buy tons of cheap insulin there. They must use the institutional suppliers, whose prices are much higher.

It's not a good situation.

But don't diss NPH and Regular.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:36 PM
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I think you'd need to stay indoors if you didn't want to run into somebody from your former place of residence.
This is why it is recommended to have plastic surgery to change one's appearance as well as the ID changes.
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Old 09-04-2018, 08:10 PM
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I know the OP said "USA", but if one really wanted to disappear, India would be the place.

Having spent 6 months there traveling all over the country, I can tell you that little effort is made keeping track of foreigners. I meet two Americans in Goa that had been in the country for over 3 years without any sort of official government documents. Their visas had expired years before. They said one only has to stay out of trouble, no fighting, no drunk driving and most importantly, don't try to leave the country. They were both working at foreign traveler restaurants, making enough money to get by and staying with local families.
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Old 09-04-2018, 10:05 PM
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MIght be as good, might be stored improperly, too old, etc.


Pretty much true. The same drugs are sold for much less in other countries than they are in the US.


Walmart insulin is perfectly fine and effective. I don't know why anyone would claim it's nowhere near as good. It's the same version of Regular and NPH that's been used for decades to treat insulin and help diabetics.

Now the Walmart NPH won't be the fancy long-acting insulins like Lantus, purported to last for 24 hours or more (but not found to be particularly more effective than NPH, tho it was until recently priced to be 10 x more expensive).

Nor will the Walmart Regular be the ultra-fast acting insulins like the novologs and humalogs. Which can be more convenient for some diabetics in some cases. Again, at 10+ x the cost of good old Regular.

But it's getting harder and harder for diabetics to get access to the low priced versions anymore. For one thing, the prices are getting jacked up by a LOT of manufacturers of these versions. For another, some health care systems (like those in prisons) are no longer allowed by Walmart and similar discount retailers to buy tons of cheap insulin there. They must use the institutional suppliers, whose prices are much higher.

It's not a good situation.

But don't diss NPH and Regular.
I don't use insulin, so I don't know how they compare. I was basing my statement on this article.

https://insulinnation.com/treatment/...nsulin-prices/

The author claims that blood sugar control with walmart insulin is far harder, but again I have no idea.
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Last edited by Wesley Clark; 09-04-2018 at 10:05 PM.
  #37  
Old 09-04-2018, 10:18 PM
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I know the OP said "USA", but if one really wanted to disappear, India would be the place.
I've been to India. Tall white guy with red hair. Real hard for me to blend in. And Indians stare at foreigners the way it is. Even in a country of over 1 billion I just don't think I'd be comfortable hiding out there. Plus don't get me started on how much I hated the place, and I was all over that country.

But YMMV.
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:26 PM
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I think it's hard to predict the difficulty.

I read a story on CNN a few years back. College girl goes missing from college, parents call authorities, searches turn up nothing , case goes cold.

She was found a few years later, a few states away.
Working under her own name and social security number.

She got tired of Mommy and Daddy's shit and actually took off and made her own way.


Note: I tried to find the news story, but every search I do is pretty much about girls who weren't found I don't wanna wade through all that.
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:58 PM
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I think it's hard to predict the difficulty
I agree. And I think who is trying to hunt you down matters as well. Authorities wanting you on a serious criminal investiation are going to be harder to stay hidden from than mom and dad.


My brother ran off a few weeks prior to his 18th birthday. We didn’t find him for over 4 months.

Of course, none of had us bothered to look for him either.


Turned out he was just shacking up with an older girl until she got sick of him. Cleared up his acne though. There wasn’ t a zit on him. Kripes even the little bump thing on his watch was gone.
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I got tired of coming up with last-minute desperate solutions to impossible problems created by other fucking people!

William Stranix
  #40  
Old 09-05-2018, 12:36 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
I've been to India. Tall white guy with red hair. Real hard for me to blend in. And Indians stare at foreigners the way it is. Even in a country of over 1 billion I just don't think I'd be comfortable hiding out there. Plus don't get me started on how much I hated the place, and I was all over that country.

But YMMV.
They do that in Thailand too. However, Bangkok, Pattaya and even Chiang Mai are places routinely used by people doing just this. There are just so many Westerners there now that it is easy to disappear. The local government is starting to crack down on that sort of thing though and trying to weed out the riffraff.
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  #41  
Old 09-05-2018, 12:38 AM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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Originally Posted by guizot View Post
Also, many (most?) DMVs would take your your fingerprint, and conceivably find a match if you already have gotten an ID with your true identity.
As I understand it, unless you live inside a CBS-TV cop show, it's functionally impossible that your biometrics alone can be used to identify you. They're not going to have any clue from the fingerprints themselves that you have changed your name, and even if you give them some other clue that that has happened, comparing your biometrics to every other person you could possibly be is cost-prohibitive.
  #42  
Old 09-06-2018, 10:14 AM
Brayne Ded Brayne Ded is offline
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Maybe not in the USA, but elsewhere?

First off; if you want to disappear from the police, that will be really tough. Sooner or later you will have contact with the law, a routine identity check will be made, and the red light flashes. Living any sort of normal life means that you in various databases and your face is on the surveillance videos. The Chinese have started checking public surveillance footage with face recognition software to find known people who are wanted. The software does not always work, but it's creepy, and you risk getting caught sooner or later. How far behind is the USA?

Getting ID of any kind, such as a driving license or a passport, is very risky. I read that some long-escaped prisoners were rounded up when face recognition software was used on the application photos. Without those, you cannot drive or leave the country. You have committed an offense if you try to get ID under a false name, and you ill be picked up if it is under your real name if the police are looking for you.

Stealing an identity would work for a while, but with the amount of electronic cross-checking that goes on you will be picked up sooner or later, and then you have to try to explain why you committed an offense.

Live somewhere remote? OK, if you like the lifestyle, but if the place is small, then everybody knows everybody. Life as a vagrant? Is that an improvement over your current situation?

Not on the lam? The suggestions already given above sound best; move away and use another name - maybe a different first name would do. That would work best in a big city.

I get the PT information about paying less/no taxes and living abroad. It sounds great, but it is not that easy. What you really need for that is a network of contacts so that you can switch countries at least twice a year and avoid any tax liability, but have cheap places to live. Unless the police are looking for you, nobody knows where you are. Probably this is the best solution if your reason for moving off is to avoid an unwanted spouse who won't give a divorce. After the divorce will be too late if you are legally required to pay alimony. Again, take care to avoid breaking any regulations or falling foul of court orders before you head off. Nobody will bother looking for you if you have a clean record.

You can of course go to a Third World country such as India, maybe some of the Latin American countries as well, and just stay there illegally and under the radar. That is OK up to a point. Where the point lies is a matter of personal taste. You have more money? Maybe head off to Monaco - but it is a very expensive place to live.
  #43  
Old 09-06-2018, 11:27 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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If the movies have taught us nothing else, it's that every town has some seedy bar where the local document forger hangs out.
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  #44  
Old 09-06-2018, 11:44 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
MIght be as good, might be stored improperly, too old, etc.


Pretty much true. The same drugs are sold for much less in other countries than they are in the US.


Walmart insulin is perfectly fine and effective. I don't know why anyone would claim it's nowhere near as good. It's the same version of Regular and NPH that's been used for decades to treat insulin and help diabetics.

Now the Walmart NPH won't be the fancy long-acting insulins like Lantus, purported to last for 24 hours or more (but not found to be particularly more effective than NPH, tho it was until recently priced to be 10 x more expensive).

Nor will the Walmart Regular be the ultra-fast acting insulins like the novologs and humalogs. Which can be more convenient for some diabetics in some cases. Again, at 10+ x the cost of good old Regular.

But it's getting harder and harder for diabetics to get access to the low priced versions anymore. For one thing, the prices are getting jacked up by a LOT of manufacturers of these versions. For another, some health care systems (like those in prisons) are no longer allowed by Walmart and similar discount retailers to buy tons of cheap insulin there. They must use the institutional suppliers, whose prices are much higher.

It's not a good situation.

But don't diss NPH and Regular.
I was in school when the old animal insulins were being phased out. I'll never forget the elderly man who came in to pick some up while I was doing rotations, and he said, "I've been using this for 42 years. I don't know what I'll do if it's gone." Change his regimen, I guess, which isn't always a good thing.

The first time I ever rung up insulin, I was a teenage Target cashier in 1980, and even though I was years away from deciding I wanted to be a pharmacist, I knew what it was, and I called the pharmacy to ask if there was a mistake because it was $6.28. Nope, that was the correct price. I kinda figured that something that important would be, like, $300 or something. And now it is.

I read about some people who were stranded in China during WW II (IIRC, missionaries and their families) and while this area was relatively unaffected by the war, they couldn't get commercially produced insulin for a while, and asked the local butchers to save the pancreases and found someone who had enough knowledge of chemistry to extract the insulin. It wasn't pure or standardized, but it did keep them alive, and when pharmaceutical-grade insulin became available again, they held onto each other and cried tears of joy.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programming..........

I suppose disappearing would be possible IF someone was willing to live a cash-only existence, and figured out a way to pull it off.
  #45  
Old 09-07-2018, 12:29 AM
AK84 AK84 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
I've been to India. Tall white guy with red hair. Real hard for me to blend in. And Indians stare at foreigners the way it is. Even in a country of over 1 billion I just don't think I'd be comfortable hiding out there. Plus don't get me started on how much I hated the place, and I was all over that country.

But YMMV.

More a case of you weren’t trying to hide.
  #46  
Old 09-07-2018, 12:53 AM
PastTense PastTense is offline
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Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
If the movies have taught us nothing else, it's that every town has some seedy bar where the local document forger hangs out.
Unfortunately the local scammers also hang out there and they are more than willing to take your money giving you nothing of value or simply disappearing.
  #47  
Old 09-07-2018, 06:24 AM
Brayne Ded Brayne Ded is offline
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It's not that hard?

My guess is that if you are not visible in the electronic world it would be very hard to find you. Avoid the social media and the forums. I would like to locate some friends from my past, in the nicest possible way, and I can't find them. They haven't changed their names or anything, and I know where they used to live, but I still can't find them.

I read that this is a requirement for the FBI; avoid anything that you are known for, including your pastimes. Things like scuba diving or flying, or something very unusual, would be relatively easy to scrutinize. Also, you have a big problem if you are known to need some sort of medication. That's how the head of the Luminoso Senderoso (Shining Path) got nabbed in Peru.

Actually, even with the police after you, people still disappear. One or two of the German Baader-Meinhof gang turned up in France only a few years, where they had lived quietly for over 20 years. The irony is that they adopted the bourgeois lifestyle that they had so despised. What did they do? Practically nothing. They just kept off the radar, did nothing to attract notice. They were found by chance. And there are other members of the gang still at large, probably in Germany, but who knows.

It just comes down to one thing; if they are no court orders or arrest warrants out for you, the police will at most file a missing persons report, if anyone cares. If you want to disappear for financial reasons, then you need to look at the PT literature and see whether it is worth the bother. The point that the PT crowd emphasize is that you need to do something before you get into trouble. Afterwards you will have the law on your heels. If you have money and can get it out of the USA, followed by your good self, then the world is your oyster - if you have enough money. You still have the problem that the IRS taxes US citizens worldwide and it is really difficult to give up US citizenship and acquire another passport and citizenship legally.

It all boils down as to why you want to hide. Bear in mind that it probably means abandoning your friends and relatives. Well, mostly. The gangster "Whitey" Bulger joined his relatives for Christmas for many years, even though there were search warrants out for him.
  #48  
Old 09-07-2018, 12:52 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Moderating

Let's not provide detailed advice on how to break the law or forge documents.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
I meant to add "don't try this at home"
Plus, doesn't the SSN sequence tell you roughly how old the number is? I would imagine assorted people who come across your number who might have even a passing familiarity with the system would say "Huh? This looks like a recently issued number!"

Then there's the line in Parker where Penelope Cruz says to Jason Latham, "I did a credit check on you and until 6 months ago you didn't exist." I suspect any attempt to do anything credit-wise, like renting an apartment from a large company or getting a credit card - going to arouse suspicion. I read that even some employers do credit checks on prospective employees. (Don't hire someone who's always got money problems...)

So are you just trying to avoid old friends and family, or any serious attention?

The "use a dead baby's ID" is very old, it was a plot point in the "Day of the Jackal" novel and original movie. I had read that after 9/11 the authorities had made additional efforts to ensure that they could catch such attempts at fake IDs.

As for India, etc. - on a short visit to India I found it a very nice place, but my impression is you don't want to be there without a decent income. (YMMV) Plus, we are spoiled in North America where it seems there is not (yet) exit controls at the borders. I have to fill out a comprehensive Visa and pay a fee to simply visit India as a tourist, and it was checked coming and going. Most third world countries (actually, most other countries) seem to have all sorts of departure checks; I do wonder what happens to foreigners who grossly overstay their welcome.

Even Tanzania was doing photos and 10-fingerprints for arriving tourists.

(I did hear story from someone who worked for a company in Indonesia on a 6-month term. They warned - "leave before the last day on your visa." In the pre-revolution days, apparently one fellow had planned to depart the last day. They pulled him aside for questioning at the airport, until after midnight at which point they arrested him for overstaying his visa, and he sat in jail until the head office realized there was a problem - and paid the appropriate, now much larger bribe to get him out of jail.)
  #49  
Old 09-07-2018, 01:04 PM
Gatopescado's Avatar
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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Originally Posted by Projammer View Post
... become an accountant...
I'd rather just kill myself.
  #50  
Old 09-07-2018, 01:09 PM
PastTense PastTense is offline
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Remember the U.S. has 12 million or so illegal aliens. How could this possibly be if it is so difficult to disappear in the U.S. as some posters here seem to think? And remember most of them look different from mainstream white Americans.
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