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Old 09-16-2018, 11:30 AM
not what you'd expect not what you'd expect is offline
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I'm thinking about driving from California to Florida ALL ALONE!

My car is new and I have GPS. I would only drive for 7 or 8 hours a day so it would take a little more than a week.

I'm a 62 year old female and of course my family is not thrilled with the idea. I'm nervous too, but that's part of the appeal for me. I think.

What do you guys think?
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:04 PM
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Will you be staying in reasonably safe motels? Will you be staying on the Interstates?

What are you afraid might happen?

Personally, I wouldn't see a problem if you are a competent driver and don't think you would get too fatigued by driving 8 hours a day for a week. (I regularly do 8-hour drives alone but not for a week at a time. I'm glad to relax after a day like that.)
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:13 PM
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My sister drove by herself from Virginia to California and back a few years ago and had a great time. She just turned 70 and is thinking about doing it again soon.
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:16 PM
2nd Law 2nd Law is offline
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I don't know your starting and endpoints, but San Francisco to Tampa is about 2900 miles for an estimated 41 hour driving time per google maps.

I'd suggest some audio books for areas where radio would not be a good option. Most of the path is on interstates, which can be boring.

Take your time, rest if you get tired, see some sites on the way. Sounds like fun to me.
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:22 PM
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Fun! I've driven across (but not round trip) and most of the way across (round trip) on my own. Priceline is great for "I'm 2 hours from Kansas City. Let me see if I can get a decent hotel cheap." I also camped at some stops, but I probably wouldn't do that now (from an aches and pains perspective). Second the suggestion to load up a few audiobooks.
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:34 PM
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If you want some company to help you stay awake, there are a few websites to hook you up with people going your way.

https://www.rdvouz.com/

https://www.ridesharing.com/
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:46 PM
chappachula chappachula is offline
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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
What are you afraid might happen?
This is the main question. Please think about it for a while, write down your answers, and then a day or two later look at what you wrote.

For myself, I can't conceive of any reason NOT to do this drive ,while enjoying every hour of it.

But you are obviously different, and have your own worries.
If your concerns are logical,then look for logical solutions.
If your concerns are less logical, and more like some sort of gut-level instinctive fear of the unknown: then think carefully, and logically, again.
If you can overcome your fears, do the trip. And Enjoy!!!
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Old 09-16-2018, 12:48 PM
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If you are comfortable in driving and travelling, it can be a great way to see parts of the country you would, otherwise travel to. Give yourself a few extra days, pick some iconic or interesting spots to stop and explore, load up on tunes and audiobooks, and sample the local flavor.

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Old 09-16-2018, 12:55 PM
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What are the constraints on the trip? If you don't have constraints just treat it as a vacation and find various sites along the way to visit.

I suggest you have your mechanic give the car a thorough examination before you leave to find any mechanical problems. You need to be sure your tires (including spare) are in good shape and property inflated. You might buy AAA or similar coverage for peace of mind.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:01 PM
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I regularly drive coast to coast to see family. I’m about the same age, but male, and never had a problem. I’m departing next week for just that.

If you or your family has a specific concern, I’m willing to address it, but I don’t think you will have any problems.

A few pointers -

You say the car is in good shape, and I believe you, but depending on your last oil change, you may come due along, say, New Mexico. I’d recommend a fresh one, along with a complete fluid check. Check tire pressure, wiper blades, and lights, too.

For multi-day drives, if your goal is to get there, plan on about 600 miles per day. You can do a bit more in the west where speed limits are higher, but 600 miles is a good days drive. You can do more, but you can get real tired, real fast.

But because it sounds like this might be a one and done sort of thing, I’d suggest stoping at an attraction or two. It’s a big, beautiful country, and there are things to see.

Have good audio entertainment. Satellite radio, iPod on shuffle, or books on tape is best, something you don’t have to fiddle with too much.

Don’t eat at chains, look for a local place. McD’s in CA is the same as in TX. Sometimes it may disappoint, but sometimes you find a place where the food is darn good.

Gas up at truck stops. They have lots of turnover, both in the fuel and the coffee - so they’re fresh. Quick off/on the interstate. They almost all have a small store for munchies and travel related items. Not supermarket prices, but well below 7-11 type stores. Gas prices may not be the cheapest for 20 miles, but they will be below average. Restrooms are clean, because truckers demand it. The chains have phone apps to help you find the closest. I like Pilot/Flying J, but Love’s is OK. T/A is OK, but there aren’t as many.

Join a hotel loyalty program. You will probably earn a free night, maybe two or three I f it’s a round trip. I don’t like chain restraints when traveling, but hotel chains don’t bother me.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:06 PM
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Road trips are an American tradition.

They are more fun if you get off the interstate and use the highways. See the small towns. Nearly every town bigger than 20 thousand will have motels. A McNally atlas will tell you where they are located.

Half the fun is spreading out the map in the motel room and planning the next days drive.

The GPS is a nice backup in case you get lost. But I'd use a map for a relaxed road trip.

The GPS will have an annoying habit of leading you back to the Interstate. It wants you to take the most efficient route. That's not what a road trip uses.

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-16-2018 at 01:09 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:10 PM
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I've driven long distances across the country a number of times and highly recommend it. You're not on anyone's schedule but your own so no constraints on where you wander, when you stop to see something v. when you don't, when you eat, etc.

My best advice: Be open to new experiences, but bring a healthy dose of awareness to strangers who attempt to engage you at public rest stops. Be mindful to not put yourself in vulnerable positions.

Also, drive on the top half of the tank and take bathroom breaks sooner rather than later. You never know what you may encounter just around the next curve that may delay your access to fuel and/or a loo. An example: I was driving to Southern California once. I passed by a town when I was in need of both, planning to drive on to and stop in the next small town about 15 miles away. Unfortunately, an electric power line fell across the entirety of I-5, fully blocking the road in both directions. We were turned back and I had to take a long detour on surface streets on fumes, with a full bladder. Fun times.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:13 PM
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I wouldn't even try to do 600 miles a day unless you're in a hurry. It's tiring and interstates are boring.

You can set GPS to avoid highways, but you potentially run the risk of winding up on some pretty crappy roads in the middle of nowhere. Do you belong to AAA? They may be able to help you plan a more scenic route.

America is a big place with a lot to see. My suggestion would be to look at all the states you might cross and figure out one, maybe two things in each state you'd like to see--keeping in mind you might need to detour. Pick your top four or five and plan around that.

Have fun!
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:24 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Oh, you can reassure your family by using a tracker web site. They can see your trip as it unfolds.

It will pin point your trip. Many of them let you blog. You can describe what you're seeing, attach photos, short videos, and express your feelings.

Then you have a wonderful record of your trip. Something you can read and bring back memories. Maybe inspire another road trip too.

Google trip blog tracker for web sites.

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-16-2018 at 01:25 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:33 PM
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I'm a man not a woman. But I'm of comparable age (56) and have driven several trips of comparable length (New York to Texas and back). And I've enjoyed the trips.

My advice is to make sure you have a reliable car and GPS. Get a AAA membership so you have somebody to call if you have a flat tire or some other mechanical problem (plus they'll give you free maps and guidebooks). Have somebody back home that you can call if you experience a more serious problem.

When you cross a state line, look for the government-run information centers. They'll hand out maps and guidebooks. But more importantly, they had out those books of hotel coupons. Grab those so you can find cheap places to stay at night. A laptop or smart phone are also handy so you can look up the discount hotel websites.

I find I have no problem driving ten or more hours a day as long as I make stops along the way to break up the driving time.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:34 PM
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Go for it. Florida is a lousy destination, but whatever. The roads are good all the way, there are plenty of places to stay and eat along the way, and if your car is in good shape it ought to be a fun trip. If you don't have a strict time schedule you can meander to your heart's content.

The next question will be "Which route?" The southern straight route is the one I'm most familiar with. Just get on the I-10 East and boogie. When you run out of road turn right. There's Florida.

I haven't done coast-to-coast but I have done border-to-border many times. Once in a single 18 hour speed run. But I was much younger and more foolish then.

Last edited by silenus; 09-16-2018 at 01:35 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:55 PM
not what you'd expect not what you'd expect is offline
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[QUOTE=Colibri;21211046]

What are you afraid might happen?



Nothing specific, just nervous about doing pretty much anything alone because I'm not used to it, I guess.

I'm a little concerned about weather. It might take me a month or so to get everything ready. Is there a time of year that would be too late to drive?

Thanks for all the replies. It sounds like it's not a terrible idea!
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:00 PM
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I wouldn't drive the Midwest after October or early Nov.

Snow is no fun. You'll see a lot of beautiful fall colors in October.

Course you can avoid the Midwest and take a Southern route. We don't get snow until late Nov. or December.

It's rare to see snow before Thanksgiving in the South. Any major winter storms are always Forecast at least a week in advance.

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-16-2018 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:04 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by not what you'd expect View Post
My car is new and I have GPS. I would only drive for 7 or 8 hours a day so it would take a little more than a week.

I'm a 62 year old female and of course my family is not thrilled with the idea. I'm nervous too, but that's part of the appeal for me. I think.

What do you guys think?
I think there's absolutely no reason why you shouldn't.

But I'm curious as to why you're considering driving instead of flying. It doesn't seem to be about stopping to see stuff along the way*, and by the time you factor in gas, motels, and restaurant meals on the road, it's probably not going to be much cheaper, if at all. So is the driving itself the main attraction? Nothing wrong with that; if that's what you want to do, then by all means do it. But I'd give different advice depending on the reason.


*Admittedly, that's reading something in to the OP, but if it was mostly to see landmarks or visit friends along the way, I'd have expected to see a list of places you planned to stop, rather than the number of hours you planned to drive each day.
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:14 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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I'm a little concerned about weather. It might take me a month or so to get everything ready. Is there a time of year that would be too late to drive?
I've never driven as far west as California. So I don't know what it's like crossing the Rockies. But most of the rest of the route should be no problem. I've driven across the south in the middle of winter and the weather's never been a problem.

I have had some problems further up like Tennessee and Virginia (and even northern Texas). They don't get serious amounts of snow but these states have virtually no capacity for dealing with snow and local drivers aren't experienced in winter driving. But snow is rare in these states and it shouldn't be any issue if you're driving from California to Florida.

However, you should pay attention to the weather and watch for heavy rain reports. You can get unbelievable amounts of rain in the south and it can affect driving conditions.
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:41 PM
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It could be a fun trip if you look at it like an adventure. Plan your route so you go through interesting areas. 600 miles day-after-day can get monotonous. Going through interesting areas will make it more enjoyable.

Have some kind of entertainment plan. Most areas of the country will have little or no radio stations. Load up on podcasts and use streaming or satellite radio.

Get the AAA road side service that comes with 100 mile towing. The basic plan only has limited towing (5 miles?). Plan your route to though through major areas and you'll likely never be more than 100 miles from a big city with good auto services.

Make sure you know how to change your tire. Even if you have AAA, it can take a long time to get help. If you change it yourself, you can be back on the road pretty quickly.

Have an emergency supply of food, water, and blankets just in case.

Post photos on your social media to share your adventure and so that people know you're okay. But the downside is that sometimes they say not to do that, since sometimes bad people could use that info to rob your vacant house.
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Old 09-16-2018, 03:06 PM
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600 miles a day would be a chore. That's 10 hours averaging 60mph.

I've certainly done that on trips, but only because I needed to get somewhere on a schedule.

I'd recommend no more than 500 miles a day or less.

Take the time to enjoy the trip. Plan to stop at interesting road side attractions or local museums. Use Yelp to locate nice restaurants instead of eating at the motel restaurant.

You can still cover 500 miles. The short breaks will make the drive less tedious.

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-16-2018 at 03:10 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 03:07 PM
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It IS a good idea to know how to change your own tire. You can practice at home if you've never done it before.

Pro tip: The wrenches on newer cars have very short handles and it can be difficult to get the bolts off. Go to a hardware store and buy a 2' length of iron pipe to slip over the handle for extra leverage.
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Old 09-16-2018, 04:04 PM
not what you'd expect not what you'd expect is offline
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I am a fairly petite older woman, I can't imagine being capable of changing a tire. I can't even open most jars by myself!

The main reason I want to drive is because I may stay several months, so I'd rather have my car. I will probably visit family in North Carolina and do some sightseeing along the east coast after I've gotten to Florida.

Thanks again everyone for all the replies.
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Old 09-16-2018, 04:19 PM
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When I drive from Florida out west I don't stop until West Texas because there's nothing to see in between, but if you've never driven that far in a stretch it's hard to know if that's your personal level of endurance. But there isn't really much to see near the central roadways from Dallas until, well, Orlando.
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Old 09-16-2018, 05:31 PM
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600 miles a day would be a chore. That's 10 hours averaging 60mph.
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!! Oh, ace, you slay me.

Oh, wait. You were serious? 600 miles is an 8 hour day at freeway speeds, dude. If you are driving 60 you are holding up traffic and even the trucks are riding your ass.

Family in NC? Then that's I-40 straight across. Depending on where you are starting from in California, that means stopping at Flagstaff (from the Bay Area) or Albuquerque (from LA) for the night. Then shoot for Oklahoma City the next night (Amarillo really isn't somewhere you want to be.) Then it's on to Memphis (if you want to sight-see/eat) or Nashville. Nashville to Charlotte is a very pretty drive, and will fill the day. That's 4 days of driving time, not more than 8 hours or so a day. Figure 10 hours of travel a day allowing for food and rest stops. Charlotte to Jacksonville is another day and Robert's your mother's brother.
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Old 09-16-2018, 05:38 PM
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I was assuming an average speed factoring in gas fill ups, bathroom breaks and a quick meal during the day. Averaging 60 to 65 on a 10 hour trip is doing pretty good.

The interstates near me are 65mph near cities and 70 out on the open road.

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-16-2018 at 05:43 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:42 PM
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I find about 500 miles per day is comfortable. I usually figure 10 hours for 8 hours actual driving.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:48 PM
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If you have the time, and the money for lodging and meals, I strongly urge you to select a few key sites to visit along the way, and break up the drive with several stops of two to three days each. Your tastes will dictate the kinds of sites you're interested in seeing (museums, monuments, theme parks, historical sites, etc.), but please don't drive 3,000 miles without stopping to see some of the great things this country has to offer. The National Parks are probably the most obvious options. If you pick three or four that aren't too far off your main route and spend a couple days in each, I guarantee you will not be sorry.

Five years ago my wife and I drove from Maryland to Las Vegas, and this summer we drove from Vegas to Atlanta. (She's 57 and I'm 62.) Each time we took 10-12 days and did what I'm urging you to do: we went white-water rafting in West Virginia, went up the Arch in St. Louis, visited my brother-in-law in Kansas City, saw the Painted Desert, Meteor Crater, and Grand Canyon (two days) before arriving in Vegas.

This summer, going east, we spent a couple of days in Zion National Park, a couple more in Rocky Mountain National Park, visited Denver, Kansas City again, and had a few days in Nashville before arriving at our new home in Atlanta.

Both were great trips, and although there were a couple of days with 12 hours of driving (which I would try to avoid in the future) the stops between helped refresh us. It would have been a terrible waste to just drive without seeing anything but the highway.
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Old 09-16-2018, 07:47 PM
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I am a fairly petite older woman, I can't imagine being capable of changing a tire. I can't even open most jars by myself!

The main reason I want to drive is because I may stay several months, so I'd rather have my car. I will probably visit family in North Carolina and do some sightseeing along the east coast after I've gotten to Florida.

Thanks again everyone for all the replies.
Understood, I'm a 50 YO man and changing a tire just about kills me. Definitely get the car full checked out and spend money on it with your trusted mechanic. Brake pads iffy? Replace them. Tires a couple years old? Replace them. And so on.

If you plan to sightsee after you reach the East Coast, sightsee on the way too! Man I think you're lucky.
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Old 09-16-2018, 08:12 PM
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Family in NC? Then that's I-40 straight across. Depending on where you are starting from in California, that means stopping at Flagstaff (from the Bay Area) or Albuquerque (from LA) for the night. Then shoot for Oklahoma City the next night (Amarillo really isn't somewhere you want to be.) Then it's on to Memphis (if you want to sight-see/eat) or Nashville. Nashville to Charlotte is a very pretty drive, and will fill the day. That's 4 days of driving time, not more than 8 hours or so a day. Figure 10 hours of travel a day allowing for food and rest stops. Charlotte to Jacksonville is another day and Robert's your mother's brother.
This is mostly a great idea. not what you'd expect lives closer to me (if she hasn't moved recently!) in Northern California. I would suggest driving only as far as Barstow or maybe to Laughlin if taking I-40 the first day, or Palm Springs if taking I-10.
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:04 PM
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I have driven and hitch hiked (in my younger years) from San Diego to Houston even before Hwy 10 was four lanes.

El Paso is only half way and I use to make it in one day ... take lots of munchies stop at rest stops, lock your car don't talk to anyone, take an ice chest, drink lots of fluids ... get a portable CB radio for emergeries, sing to yourself, stay awake and follow all of the other advice in here.
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:20 PM
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Assuming you're physically up for it and you car is in good shape, if you're doing it via interstates, I can't see much to worry about - it's quite safe (if incredibly boring - get on I-10 and your GPS might tell you "Exit in 2500 miles...")
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:27 PM
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I've driven cross-country by myself several times. There's nothing that can happen to you on the road that can't happen to you in your hometown.

DO IT!
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Old 09-16-2018, 10:01 PM
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My sixty and sixty-three year old great-aunts did it (only one could drive) - in 1939!

You can do it.
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Old 09-17-2018, 06:10 AM
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It's already been said, but my first thought was to make sure your vehicle is given a good once-over by a mechanic you trust. And since you're not on a hard schedule, pace yourself and enjoy!
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Old 09-17-2018, 07:06 AM
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I don't know your starting and endpoints, but San Francisco to Tampa is about 2900 miles for an estimated 41 hour driving time per google maps.

I'd suggest some audio books for areas where radio would not be a good option. Most of the path is on interstates, which can be boring.
About twice my Spain-Sweden drive. I don't want to be listening to stuff I may actually need to pay attention to, but a thumb drive loaded with music and/or a music program work for me (Spotify, Tidal - just make sure you check how they affect your data plan; mine includes Tidal).

I took it in three days each way. It's doable and hey, you're not in a hurry. You can always stop for a couple of nights somewhere interesting.
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Old 09-17-2018, 07:25 AM
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I do long drives through Canada and the US often. I usually try to get between 12-13 hours @ 65-70 mph but traffic and weather can affect how far I get tremendously on long drives.

Some good advice here, I'd add a couple things.

Familiarize yourself with the route by using Google Maps, etc.. before you go so you have a mental image of where you're going.

Learn the fuel range for your vehicle.

Plan your milestones for breaks, gas, food, and overnight stops accordingly . On the interstate, there will be a Welcome Centre at every state border.

Learn to use your cruise control. This will help with maintaining an average speed, gas mileage, and driver fatigue.

I also recommend satellite radio, podcasts, audiobooks, etc.. You'd be surprised how fast the time goes by when you have something to entertain you.

Have your car inspected and oil checked/changed. You may need new windshield wipers.
Fill you window washer fluid and bring an extra jug.
Check your that your spare tire is inflated and easy to get out. You'd be surprised how many people discover their spare is rusted in place and cannot be removed from it's mount.
Get some long jumper cables.

Load the car with water, towels, glass cleaner, toilet paper, flashlight.

Last edited by Sparky812; 09-17-2018 at 07:26 AM.
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:18 AM
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IF you are taking the direct southern I-10 route that silenus mentions, it is long straight and boring. I've done this a few times. It goes through the longest point-to-point parts of Texas, and there are many times you don't see any civilization for long LONG periods. Stop for gas when you find it, even if you only need a half tank. Again, IF you are planning this route, plan on diverting from the route at a few points for a break and staying a night.
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:31 AM
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Definitely do the audio books. Should be able to get them at your local library (or even online). My wife and I do this and it helps immensely. We leave on a 4000 mile road trip in 6 days.
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:41 AM
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Bring a cell phone, just call AAA or whatever if you have any problems, don't overdo the driving in any particular day, and there's like a 99.9% that the driving part of the trip goes off without a hitch.

The odds are very, very high that the only problems you will encounter would be related to weather, hotel rooms being sub-par, or a couple meals were not as good as you hoped.
  #42  
Old 09-17-2018, 09:11 AM
Turble Turble is offline
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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
I've driven cross-country by myself several times. There's nothing that can happen to you on the road that can't happen to you in your hometown.

DO IT!
My thoughts exactly.
  #43  
Old 09-17-2018, 09:57 AM
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ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is offline
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Yeah you can totally do it!
  #44  
Old 09-17-2018, 10:12 AM
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beowulff beowulff is offline
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Pro tip: plan your trip using the Road Food Guide!
  #45  
Old 09-17-2018, 10:17 AM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is online now
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Originally Posted by not what you'd expect View Post
The main reason I want to drive is because I may stay several months, so I'd rather have my car. I will probably visit family in North Carolina and do some sightseeing along the east coast after I've gotten to Florida.
OK, that makes sense. Yeah, go for it!

As others have said, have a membership in AAA or some other roadside-assistance plan just so you don't have to change your own tire if it should happen. (It probably won't, but better safe than sorry.) But there's absolutely no reason you shouldn't do this. Enjoy!
  #46  
Old 09-17-2018, 12:52 PM
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silenus silenus is offline
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Originally Posted by Rhiannon8404 View Post
This is mostly a great idea. not what you'd expect lives closer to me (if she hasn't moved recently!) in Northern California. I would suggest driving only as far as Barstow or maybe to Laughlin if taking I-40 the first day, or Palm Springs if taking I-10.
Laughlin. I wouldn't wish Barstow on my worst enemy, and the river is only another hour away. I-40 is definitely the prettier drive.
  #47  
Old 09-17-2018, 01:04 PM
senoy senoy is offline
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I would say your biggest issue is just that you'll be bored out of your skull. It's not a particularly dangerous thing to do--we live in a pretty connected world all things considered. My issue is that it'll be mostly interstate and your only company will be your radio. That leaves long days. Breaking it up with little stops can help, but it still won't be a joy.

My only advice is to rent a car. Renting a car for roadtrips can be very wise. You end up putting the miles on their vehicle and if there's a breakdown, you call Enterprise, tell them their vehicle is on the side of the road and they need to bring you another one. I rent on almost any roadtrip over 1000 miles.
  #48  
Old 09-17-2018, 01:13 PM
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Nothing to add - except remember this rule: never pass-up the opportunity to use a bathroom/get fuel/grab food. If any of those things are pinging your radar, stop at the next opportunity to take care of it. Especially out west, where it could be an hour or two between towns. Don't think "Oh, I can last/get that in a little while..."

Enjoy your road trip!
  #49  
Old 09-17-2018, 01:45 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Desert highways (regardless of the amount of light) out West is where my Prius really shines (although if it is indeed a dark desert highway it wouldn't literally shine.)

The cars I've had before got around 300 miles before they needed gas in the East and the Prius gets at least 400. Out West you need to get fuel early rather than expect a gas station, and the Prius looks even better because the ratio of 250 to 350 is even larger.

(Now, going up and down huge mountains is another story. Mountains are so large in the west that the regenerative braking system maxes out and wastes the extra potential energy, and to add insult to injury, once I hit the level, the engine hasn't been running for several minutes and so the computer will refuse to let me burn off that battery juice and will run on ICE mode for another minute or so to keep itself warmed up.)
  #50  
Old 09-18-2018, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Oh, wait. You were serious? 600 miles is an 8 hour day at freeway speeds, dude. If you are driving 60 you are holding up traffic and even the trucks are riding your ass.
I used to drive San Jose to Los Angeles in 4 hours(*), but now I'm several years older than OP wouldn't plan on 600 miles per day. (Of course freeways in the U.S. are much less nerve-wracking, I'm sure, than the highways where I live. Here my brain would be numbed by the need for constant vigilance before 600 miles.)

* - CHP strategy was to swoop down the freeway at 85 or 90 mph, pulling over anyone they had trouble overtaking. The trick was to drive faster than the CHP. Keep a close watch at distant cars in front: You do not want to overtake the CHP. Disclaimer: my experience was in the 20th century. By now CHP probably has radars or airplanes to thwart guys like me.
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