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Old 12-28-2018, 08:07 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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Can a King/Queen be removed by the government?

I don't mean by an armed method , by a legal method.

Can the UK, Sweden, Spain, etc. parliament decide one day to say "we prefer John Smith to be King and approve that law?" And the current King/Queen no longer has the title.
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Old 12-28-2018, 08:31 AM
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Australia also has its own Queen, who also happens to moonlight as Queen Elizabeth II. At the moment she is the pinnacle of the Australian constitutional food-chain as our head of state, represented by an appointed Governor-General.

There is an intermittent movement to make Australia a republic, which would require a constitutional amendment to provide for an elected head of state. Australia would not otherwise change anything else and could remain a member of the Commonwealth.

That's the legal mechanism to remove our Queen. The last referendum to make that change failed, but there is some [a bit maybe, ish] of a feeling that once the Old Girl dies there will be less appetite for her son to take over and a referendum backed by the government would pass. In theory we could have a referendum question to replace her with the descendants of Ex-King Zog of Albania or another worthy regal lineage, but somehow I don't think so.
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Old 12-28-2018, 08:33 AM
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The Norwegian rules of succession are part of the constitution, and the constitution can only be changed by a 2/3 vote of at least 2/3s of parliament in two consecutive parliamentary periods.

But given a strong majority over several years for such a major change the parliament can do almost anything.
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:12 AM
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Australia also has its own Queen, who also happens to moonlight as Queen Elizabeth II. At the moment she is the pinnacle of the Australian constitutional food-chain as our head of state, represented by an appointed Governor-General.
It is more accurate to say that QEII is the Australian Commonwealth's Monarch whose single role is to appoint the Head of State, being the Governor General, on the advice of the Prime Minister.
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:22 AM
Great Antibob Great Antibob is offline
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The examples given seem to be methods by which a nation can either choose to no longer to have a monarchy or to decide successors to existing monarchs.

Following up on the OP, are there any nations with legal, non-violent methods to remove a sitting monarch from that position and what are those nations/methods? Or, again legal and non-violent, to replace a sitting monarch with another person?
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:42 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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In 2008 Nepal got rid of their King and declared they are a republic . That was after a Marxist takeover of the government. It was not violent removal but there had been a war going on for a while before that takeover.
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Old 12-28-2018, 10:12 AM
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Following up on the OP, are there any nations with legal, non-violent methods to remove a sitting monarch from that position and what are those nations/methods? Or, again legal and non-violent, to replace a sitting monarch with another person?
Japan does not. In fact, when the current Emperor wanted to abdicate, a special law was required in order to allow this, and the law was customized for only him.

There are only four in line for the throne: the heir, the Crown Prince who will ascend to the throne in spring next year; the spare, the Crown Prince’s younger brother; the younger brother’s son; and then the current Emperor’s younger brother.

There is a law which codifies all of this, and it is possible to change this, although not likely unless there were extraordinary circumstances.

Laws allowing monarchs to be changed on the whims of politicians would not be really popular. The people who really care about having the monarchs are the same ones who care that the bloodlines and traditions are carefully followed.
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Old 12-28-2018, 10:16 AM
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It is more accurate to say that QEII is the Australian Commonwealth's Monarch whose single role is to appoint the Head of State, being the Governor General, on the advice of the Prime Minister.
That may be true of Australia. In Canada, the Queen is the official head of state and the governor general her representative and carries out her "wishes", as decreed by the Canadian parliament. That can be changed only by a constitutional amendment and that is virtually impossible.

I don't know how true this is, but I read once that the constitution specifies male primogeniture, while Britain now specifies simple primogeniture. Thus it could happen sometime in the future that a queen regnant could be the head of state of Britain while her younger brother be the formal head of state of Canada.
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Old 12-28-2018, 11:45 AM
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Varies by location and time, of course.

Sancho I of León was removed from office by Parliament because his obesity and obsession with food made him incapable; his grandmother Toda, queen of Navarre, took him to visit her son-in-law Abderramán III in Córdoba, where Sancho went on a crash diet. Eventually and with the help of Abderramán's troops he recovered his kingdom.

Article 59 of the current Spanish Consitution states:
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1. Cuando el Rey fuere menor de edad, el padre o la madre del Rey y, en su defecto, el pariente mayor de edad más próximo a suceder en la Corona, según el orden establecido en la Constitución, entrará a ejercer inmediatamente la Regencia y la ejercerá durante el tiempo de la minoría de edad del Rey.

2. Si el Rey se inhabilitare para el ejercicio de su autoridad y la imposibilidad fuere reconocida por las Cortes Generales, entrará a ejercer inmediatamente la Regencia el Príncipe heredero de la Corona, si fuere mayor de edad. Si no lo fuere, se procederá de la manera prevista en el apartado anterior, hasta que el Príncipe heredero alcance la mayoría de edad.

3. Si no hubiere ninguna persona a quien corresponda la Regencia, ésta será nombrada por las Cortes Generales, y se compondrá de una, tres o cinco personas.

4. Para ejercer la Regencia es preciso ser español y mayor de edad.

5. La Regencia se ejercerá por mandato constitucional y siempre en nombre del Rey.
1. Being the Monarch a minor, their father or mother, or if these are not available the adult relative closest to the succession line, will become Regent during the Monarch's minority.

2. If the Monarch is demonstrated to be incapable, and having this incapacity being recognized by Parliament [N: both chambers], the Crown Prince shall become Regent if an adult; otherwise, Regency shall be set as per 1.

3. If nobody fulfills the previous requisites, a Regent or Regents in number of 1, 3 or 5 shall be appointed by Parliament.

4. The Regent(s) must hold Spanish nationality and be a legal adult.

5. The Regent(s) shall always act according to the Constitution and in the Monarch's name.


So, in case of dementia, coma, etc. Parliament can remove the Monarch, but they can't do it because they've decided they don't like the current one.
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Last edited by Nava; 12-28-2018 at 11:48 AM.
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Old 12-28-2018, 11:52 AM
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Australia also has its own Queen, who also happens to moonlight as Queen Elizabeth II. ...
Out of curiosity:

I suppose you refer to her as "the Queen" or "our Queen" but when a typical Australian feels inclined to provide a place-name when referring to her casually, is she "Queen of Australia"? "Queen of England"? "Queen of the Commonwealth"? Other? [and same question for Canadians]
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:09 PM
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As far as the UK is concerned, the answer is "Yes of course". There's no written constitution to say what parliament can or can't, must or mustn't, do, so if a parliamentary majority took it into its head to pass a law abolishing the monarchy, of course it could.

As a matter of practical reality, though, public opinion would need to be clearly onside after long public debate, general election and/or a referendum; but there is no prescribed rule or procedure.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:13 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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isn't there talk some want Charles to not be king and go right to William? I assume Charles is not in favor of that plan. I guess the idea is to go with a younger person.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:20 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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Indeed, the UK's current monarch was established by acts of Parliament, establishing a line of succession long ago and amended to account for events like the abdication of Edward VIII. So as PatrickLondon indicated, the only constraints on Parliament's ability to designate a new monarch by law are political.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:23 PM
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Can the UK, Sweden, Spain, etc. parliament decide one day to say "we prefer John Smith to be King and approve that law?" And the current King/Queen no longer has the title.
The UK precedent is set by the Glorious Revolution. While it wasn't entirely without military effort, it was at the behest of Parliament.

However the modern way, as in the case of Edward VIII, is to force them to abdicate. This avoids any mess and provides the ex-monarch with a cushy retirement to ensure their compliance.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:24 PM
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isn't there talk some want Charles to not be king and go right to William? I assume Charles is not in favor of that plan. I guess the idea is to go with a younger person.
I expect Charles to become King; I hope his first and only act is to abdicate in favour of William.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:28 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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what's the record for oldest person to become king/queen? In UK or any country? Charles is 70 now.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:41 PM
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what's the record for oldest person to become king/queen? In UK or any country? Charles is 70 now.
UK answer - assuming he survives his mother, Charles will be the oldest person ever to become monarch.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:54 PM
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what's the record for oldest person to become king/queen? In UK or any country? Charles is 70 now.
In the UK it was William IV at 64 - Charles will easily beat him. The last Mughal Bahadur Shah was ~62.

I'm not aware of anyone older, but there might be a few. However in general ascending to the throne so late in life is quite rare. Particularly in the pre-modern era when adult mortality rates( quite aside from the notorious skewing by high child mortality rates )were not nearly so favorable and enfeebled monarchs and competitors were a little more apt to be pushed aside or out-competed by ambitious youngsters. If a monarch did live to an unusually ripe old age they were very liable to outlive their children.

Louis XIV for example is still the record-holder as longest reigning European monarch at a little over 72 years( QEII is gaining on him ). But he was succeeded by a five-year old great-grandson.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 12-28-2018 at 12:54 PM.
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Old 12-28-2018, 12:56 PM
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The UK precedent is set by the Glorious Revolution. While it wasn't entirely without military effort, it was at the behest of Parliament.

However the modern way, as in the case of Edward VIII, is to force them to abdicate. This avoids any mess and provides the ex-monarch with a cushy retirement to ensure their compliance.
Parliament claimed that James II also abdicated. They said that by leaving England the way he did, he was also making a de facto abdication and choosing to give up his throne. James denied this but Parliament was writing the rules.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 12-28-2018 at 12:57 PM.
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Old 12-28-2018, 01:07 PM
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what's the record for oldest person to become king/queen? In UK or any country? Charles is 70 now.
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Originally Posted by PaulParkhead View Post
UK answer - assuming he survives his mother, Charles will be the oldest person ever to become monarch.
Sophia of Hanover was the Heir Presumptive when she died in 1714. She died in June and Queen Anne (her cousin) died in August; if that had been reversed, Sophia would have become Queen at the age of 83.
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Old 12-28-2018, 01:08 PM
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Japan does not. In fact, when the current Emperor wanted to abdicate, a special law was required in order to allow this, and the law was customized for only him.
You say "Japan does not", but the example you gave of a law being passed to allow for a change of emperor seems to fit the OP's criteria quite well.

The abolition of the office of emperor would require a change to the constitution, which can be by means of a referendum or a parliamentary super-majority. Neither is likely but it does represent a non-violent route to abolition, should the political/public will favour that option.
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Old 12-28-2018, 01:10 PM
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Article 59 of the current Spanish Consitution states:

1. Being the Monarch a minor, their father or mother, or if these are not available the adult relative closest to the succession line, will become Regent during the Monarch's minority.

2. If the Monarch is demonstrated to be incapable, and having this incapacity being recognized by Parliament [N: both chambers], the Crown Prince shall become Regent if an adult; otherwise, Regency shall be set as per 1.

3. If nobody fulfills the previous requisites, a Regent or Regents in number of 1, 3 or 5 shall be appointed by Parliament.

4. The Regent(s) must hold Spanish nationality and be a legal adult.

5. The Regent(s) shall always act according to the Constitution and in the Monarch's name.


So, in case of dementia, coma, etc. Parliament can remove the Monarch, but they can't do it because they've decided they don't like the current one.
The appointment of a regent doesn't imply the removal of the monarch, though. In a regency the monarch retains the title while someone else discharges his/her duties.
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Old 12-28-2018, 01:22 PM
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In Britain the rightful King is whoever the Parliament says it is .
However, under the Statute of Westminster, all changes in the succession are void unless the remaining Commonwealth Realms pass exactly similar legislation.
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Old 12-28-2018, 01:39 PM
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In Britain the rightful King is whoever the Parliament says it is .
However, under the Statute of Westminster, all changes in the succession are void unless the remaining Commonwealth Realms pass exactly similar legislation.
And as an example, they recently amended the succession to make male and female heirs equal. At this point, given Charles, William, George already in line before Charlotte, no terribly relevant. But it's an example of how the British system works. they simply pass a law.... then the Queen signs it. then it takes effect.

Last edited by md2000; 12-28-2018 at 01:40 PM.
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Old 12-28-2018, 02:18 PM
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isn't there talk some want Charles to not be king and go right to William? I assume Charles is not in favor of that plan. I guess the idea is to go with a younger person.
They are already achieving the effect without changing the formalities, just by careful management of PR and the choice of events and activities each gets involved in.
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Old 12-28-2018, 03:57 PM
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The appointment of a regent doesn't imply the removal of the monarch, though. In a regency the monarch retains the title while someone else discharges his/her duties.
That's a crucial distinction. Pretty much every constitutional monarchy has some provision for the appointment of a regency, with no need for the formal removal of the existing monarch.

An odd exception was Bavaria during the final years of its monarchy. The experience of two mad kings in succession (including Ludwig II) and the long regency of Prince Luitpold finally brought about a constitutional amendment in 1913 by which a regent was allowed to declare themselves king if a regency had already lasted ten years. This meant that Luitpold's son was then immediately able to become Ludwig III.
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Old 12-28-2018, 06:12 PM
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Out of curiosity:

I suppose you refer to her as "the Queen" or "our Queen" but when a typical Australian feels inclined to provide a place-name when referring to her casually, is she "Queen of Australia"? "Queen of England"? "Queen of the Commonwealth"? Other? [and same question for Canadians]
Out of those options, it would almost certainly be "Queen of England". The average Australian has neither a great sense of ownership in Queen Liz, nor a very comprehensive education in the distinctions between various parts of the UK
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Old 12-28-2018, 06:36 PM
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Out of curiosity:

I suppose you refer to her as "the Queen" or "our Queen" but when a typical Australian feels inclined to provide a place-name when referring to her casually, is she "Queen of Australia"? "Queen of England"? "Queen of the Commonwealth"? Other? [and same question for Canadians]
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Out of those options, it would almost certainly be "Queen of England". The average Australian has neither a great sense of ownership in Queen Liz, nor a very comprehensive education in the distinctions between various parts of the UK
In Canada, it's simply "The Queen.". Well, in English Canada anyway. Charles will certainly be the next king, unless he dies before Elizabeth. It may be short-lived, but he's been groomed for this his whole life.
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Old 12-28-2018, 06:42 PM
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As far as the UK is concerned, the answer is "Yes of course". There's no written constitution to say what parliament can or can't, must or mustn't, do, so if a parliamentary majority took it into its head to pass a law abolishing the monarchy, of course it could.
Wouldn't the Monarch have to give Royal Assent for it to take effect? Edward VII had to do so
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First, there was no provision in British law for a sovereign to abdicate. Parliament had to pass a bill to remove the king from the throne. Finally the king had to give royal assent to the legislation, which only then became a law. (This process had to be repeated in the parliaments of the Dominions which had enacted the Statute of Westminster 1931: Canada and South Africa.)
The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?
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Old 12-28-2018, 07:21 PM
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Wouldn't the Monarch have to give Royal Assent for it to take effect? Edward VII had to do so



The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?

Then things get Interesting.

Didn't Belgium's king refuse to sign an abortion law sometime in the Nineties, and Parliament declared him incapacitated until the law was passed anyway?



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Old 12-28-2018, 09:32 PM
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The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?
I struggle to fathom your preoccupation with the divine right of kings.

The Runneymede Convention was established 800 years ago.
The definitive nail was hammered in by "cruel necessity" in front of the Banqueting House in 1649.

Time to move on, maybe?
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:48 PM
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isn't there talk some want Charles to not be king and go right to William?.
Not from anybody informed.

Elizabeth R will reign until her death. That's the gig.
She will be succeeded by her heir who is currently Charles, who in turn will reign til his demise. For the Windsors, there's already been one abdication too many in the family.

It's a monarchy, not a meritocracy, hagiocracy or a reality TV show.
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:51 PM
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The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?
Charles I and James II didn't want to be removed either and refused all cooperation with Parliamentary attempts to depose them. But Parliament won.
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Old 12-28-2018, 10:22 PM
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The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?
In that case, Parliament would exercise a block vote.
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Old 12-29-2018, 12:04 AM
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Wouldn't the Monarch have to give Royal Assent for it to take effect? Edward VII had to do so


The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?
Even if you only look within the strict parameters of written law, they could get Miss Zenouska Mowatt to agree to give royal assent and then declare everyone else before her to be unfit to do so. Imagine the 25th Amendment but with thousands of successors.

Last edited by Lord Feldon; 12-29-2018 at 12:07 AM.
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Old 12-29-2018, 12:37 AM
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Wouldn't the Monarch have to give Royal Assent for it to take effect? Edward VII had to do so
That Act was about the legal consequences of the Instrument of Abdication Edward VIII had already signed (having, perhaps, been slightly surprised to find his bluff called - the possibility of abdication was his idea in the first place) ; his successor was already in place.

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The question then would be what would happen if the Monarch doesn't want to be removed?
Everyone would be scrabbling through the records for 1688 to establish precedents for parliament to declare a vacancy and rule on what happens next. Whether it would get to the point of needing to send someone in to physically remove the monarch and their personal effects from Buckingham Palace and Windsor, or to switch off the electricity until they go of their own accord, who knows?

Last edited by PatrickLondon; 12-29-2018 at 12:38 AM.
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Old 12-29-2018, 01:49 AM
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You say "Japan does not", but the example you gave of a law being passed to allow for a change of emperor seems to fit the OP's criteria quite well.



The abolition of the office of emperor would require a change to the constitution, which can be by means of a referendum or a parliamentary super-majority. Neither is likely but it does represent a non-violent route to abolition, should the political/public will favour that option.
I was not responding to the OP, but to the question which I quoted.
Quote:
Following up on the OP, are there any nations with legal, non-violent methods to remove a sitting monarch from that position and what are those nations/methods? Or, again legal and non-violent, to replace a sitting monarch with another person?
My interpretation of that question was that they are asking if there are currently established procedures for that purpose. No, in Japan’s case it would require a change in law, which I clearly stated in my third paragraph.

In contrast, there are established laws concerning the change in governments, for example.

If the question were phrased such as “Is it possible for this to happen?” Then the obvious answer is that in all modern democracies then anything the voters decide could eventually occur, although depending on the subject, it would be difficult and perhaps impossible from a practical standpoint.

If a question were posed as “can States succeed from the Union in a legal, nonviolent method?” Then I would assume the person is asking about the current rules as any democracy with a constitution can modify the constitution without resorting to bloodshed if sufficient people agree.
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Old 12-29-2018, 04:51 AM
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Out of those options, it would almost certainly be "Queen of England". The average Australian has neither a great sense of ownership in Queen Liz, nor a very comprehensive education in the distinctions between various parts of the UK
Thanks for the answer! I wonder if the 'of England' rather than the 'of the U.K.' has less to do with ignorance and more to do with
(a) "King of England" was the traditional designation for the chief of the English-speaking people for almost a thousand years after their first political union.
(b) For an Australian to refer to his Monarch as "of U.K.", would call attention to the fact that Australia and U.K. are different countries. "England", OTOH, can be viewed as almost a metaphor, like Gilead or Zion.

My Australian expat friend agreed with "of England" when pressed. And so did my English expat friend! (Remember: my question isn't what her technical title is — it's what do ordinary folk call her when chatting in a pub, assuming they choose to append an "of Placename" at all.)
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Old 12-29-2018, 05:24 AM
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Thanks for the answer! I wonder if the 'of England' rather than the 'of the U.K.' has less to do with ignorance and more to do with
(a) "King of England" was the traditional designation for the chief of the English-speaking people for almost a thousand years after their first political union.
(b) For an Australian to refer to his Monarch as "of U.K.", would call attention to the fact that Australia and U.K. are different countries. "England", OTOH, can be viewed as almost a metaphor, like Gilead or Zion.

My Australian expat friend agreed with "of England" when pressed. And so did my English expat friend! (Remember: my question isn't what her technical title is — it's what do ordinary folk call her when chatting in a pub, assuming they choose to append an "of Placename" at all.)
But wait! She is, according to Wikipedia Queen of Australia:

Australian constitutional law provides that the monarch of the United Kingdom is also the monarch in Australia.
This is understood today to constitute a separate Australian monarchy, the monarch acting with regard to Australian affairs exclusively upon the advice of Australian ministers. ..
.

I don't think that makes a practical difference to giving her or one of the family the boot.
  #40  
Old 12-29-2018, 08:10 AM
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The Act of Settlement and such limited who could be the monarch of the UK.

What if Parliament passes a new law limiting succession (or even regarding the current ruler) so that person doesn't qualify? E.g., no one named Charles may become King?

Complication: making changes to the Act can get a bunch of Commonwealth states involved.

What if they play games regarding the CoE's role and redefines the religion in an odd way so that the current monarch suddenly doesn't qualify?
  #41  
Old 12-29-2018, 03:34 PM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is offline
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What if, indeed? That's what parliamentary and public debate is all about - thrashing out all the implications of each new proposal.
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Old 12-29-2018, 04:43 PM
hibernicus hibernicus is offline
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Originally Posted by TokyoBayer View Post
I was not responding to the OP, but to the question which I quoted. My interpretation of that question was that they are asking if there are currently established procedures for that purpose. No, in Japan’s case it would require a change in law, which I clearly stated in my third paragraph.

In contrast, there are established laws concerning the change in governments, for example.

If the question were phrased such as “Is it possible for this to happen?” Then the obvious answer is that in all modern democracies then anything the voters decide could eventually occur, although depending on the subject, it would be difficult and perhaps impossible from a practical standpoint.
Fair enough. These are indeed two different questions, either or both of which may be of interest to the OP.
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Old 12-29-2018, 06:21 PM
Ignotus Ignotus is offline
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I don't mean by an armed method , by a legal method.

Can the UK, Sweden, Spain, etc. parliament decide one day to say "we prefer John Smith to be King and approve that law?" And the current King/Queen no longer has the title.
It would take at least three years in Sweden, if we should stick to constitutional law (it would have to be approved by two succinct governments, with a general election in between) but yes, it could happen (though I find chances today pretty much like zero). It could and did happen much more readily in the old days...
  #44  
Old 12-29-2018, 09:48 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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Japan does not. In fact, when the current Emperor wanted to abdicate, a special law was required in order to allow this, and the law was customized for only him...
Neither does the UK; when Edward VIII abdicated back in 1936 his "Instrument of Abdication" was just him declaring his wish to abdicate in writing. Then Parliament* passed a law declaring that he was no longer king and that his descendants wouldn't have any inheritances rights to the crown (nor would he or them require royal permission to marry). Only once Royal Assent was granted in his name to the act did Edward VIII cease to be king. Just like in Japan it was a special law that applied only in that specific case.


*Canada, South Africa, and the Irish Free State passed their own laws with the same effect to demonstrate their recent independence under the Statute of Westminster.
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Last edited by alphaboi867; 12-29-2018 at 09:50 PM.
  #45  
Old 12-30-2018, 01:50 AM
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In Canada, it's simply "The Queen.". Well, in English Canada anyway. Charles will certainly be the next king, unless he dies before Elizabeth. It may be short-lived, but he's been groomed for this his whole life.
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(Remember: my question isn't what her technical title is — it's what do ordinary folk call her when chatting in a pub, assuming they choose to append an "of Placename" at all.)
I have to agree with Leaffan, at least as far as Canada goes. Constitutionally and legally, Elizabeth is styled Queen of Canada, though in everyday conversation between ordinary people, she is simply referred to as the Queen.

There are a few people in Canada who will refer to her as Queen of England, but they tend to be those who cannot wrap their heads around the fact that the two offices (Queen of Canada and Queen of the UK) are embodied in the same person.

So, simply "the Queen" works well.
  #46  
Old 12-30-2018, 03:05 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is offline
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It's like our postage stamps. They don't mention that they're from the UK, either. Other countries' stamps do, and their heads of state usually need to be identified by their country too.
  #47  
Old 12-30-2018, 11:31 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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as far as changes go it only took 1000 years or so to change that a woman can be queen rather than her younger brother . The changes come at the speed of glaciers.
  #48  
Old 12-30-2018, 12:20 PM
Throatwarbler Mangrove Throatwarbler Mangrove is offline
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Sophia of Hanover was the Heir Presumptive when she died in 1714. She died in June and Queen Anne (her cousin) died in August; if that had been reversed, Sophia would have become Queen at the age of 83.
The current king of Saudi Arabia, Salman, succeeded his brother Abdullah at age 79.
  #49  
Old 12-30-2018, 03:23 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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Charles I and James II didn't want to be removed either and refused all cooperation with Parliamentary attempts to depose them. But Parliament won.
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
In that case, Parliament would exercise a block vote.
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Even if you only look within the strict parameters of written law, they could get Miss Zenouska Mowatt to agree to give royal assent and then declare everyone else before her to be unfit to do so. Imagine the 25th Amendment but with thousands of successors.
So effectively if Parliament wants the Monarch removed via legal means and the Monarch refuses to cooperate and withholds Royal Assent, then the House of Commons will lead a coup and install whomever they want?
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  #50  
Old 12-30-2018, 04:09 PM
Malden Capell Malden Capell is offline
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So effectively if Parliament wants the Monarch removed via legal means and the Monarch refuses to cooperate and withholds Royal Assent, then the House of Commons will lead a coup and install whomever they want?
Broadly so, yes. It would depend on the precise issue at hand. If the Commons was acting against the wishes of the majority of the public, that would be a potential break on the Commons. But if the monarch were in trouble for breaching the many conventions surrounding the operation of the monarchy and running the reputation of the Crown and/or country through the mud, then there's little kidding which institution would win a battle of wills.
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