Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-05-2019, 03:57 PM
Jim B. Jim B. is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 1,907
Building the Pyramids Today.

A lot of amazing structures are around even today. Stonehenge, the Easter island monoliths--and the Pyramids, just to name a few. The Pyramids are so amazing, they even have a place on the US great seal, as a symbol of human achievement.

But could we build them today?

Could we chisel the blocks, move them and position them just so, like they are in these amazing structures?

And actually I have a second question. And this admittedly is a little bit more abstract. Could we do it if we put our minds to it, like they did back then?



EDIT: Actually now that I think about it, this might be better suited for GD. But we'll see how it works out.
__________________
"Love takes no less than everything." (from "Love Is", a duet by Vanessa Williams and Brian McKnight)

Last edited by Jim B.; 01-05-2019 at 03:59 PM. Reason: Slight content revision.
  #2  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:18 PM
ZonexandScout's Avatar
ZonexandScout ZonexandScout is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 1,275
Of course, the answer to both questions is "yes." Given enough money, it would hardly be a technical challenge. Much easier if we're able to use modern technology, but doable either way.

But now I'm curious. Why would anyone think that they COULDN'T be replicated? Contrary to some people's belief, there's hardly anything mysterious about their actual, physical construction. As to the exact techniques that were used, there is some conjecture.
  #3  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:23 PM
snfaulkner's Avatar
snfaulkner snfaulkner is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: 123 Fake Street
Posts: 7,060
Could we use the geyser system this time, please?
  #4  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:34 PM
mbh mbh is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 4,294
With modern power tools, cutting the blocks would be easy.

The largest blocks were 80 000 kg. NASA's crawler-transporters are capable of moving 1 800 000 kg. So moving the blocks is doable.

The biggest obstacle is financial.
  #5  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:47 PM
Bear_Nenno's Avatar
Bear_Nenno Bear_Nenno is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Bavaria
Posts: 8,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim B. View Post
A lot of amazing structures are around even today. Stonehenge, the Easter island monoliths--and the Pyramids, just to name a few. The Pyramids are so amazing, they even have a place on the US great seal, as a symbol of human achievement.

But could we build them today?

Could we chisel the blocks, move them and position them just so, like they are in these amazing structures?

And actually I have a second question. And this admittedly is a little bit more abstract. Could we do it if we put our minds to it, like they did back then?



EDIT: Actually now that I think about it, this might be better suited for GD. But we'll see how it works out.
Not only could we do it, we could do it in a quarter of the time, using less than half the number of people they did.
  #6  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:51 PM
Bear_Nenno's Avatar
Bear_Nenno Bear_Nenno is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Bavaria
Posts: 8,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbh View Post
With modern power tools, cutting the blocks would be easy.

The largest blocks were 80 000 kg. NASA's crawler-transporters are capable of moving 1 800 000 kg. So moving the blocks is doable.
Hell, the Liebherr Mobile Crane could easily lift those blocks and its boom could almost reach 3/4 of the way to the top. Build a ramp, or a slightly bigger crane, and it's a breeze.
  #7  
Old 01-05-2019, 05:03 PM
MEBuckner's Avatar
MEBuckner MEBuckner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Posts: 11,825
According to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, "Hoover Dam was the first man-made structure to exceed the masonry mass of the Great Pyramid of Giza". And the Three Gorges Dam in China is "five times larger" than the Hoover Dam.
__________________
"In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves." -- Carl Sagan

Ceterum censeo imperium Trumpi esse delendam
  #8  
Old 01-05-2019, 05:09 PM
SamuelA SamuelA is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 2,775
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEBuckner View Post
According to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, "Hoover Dam was the first man-made structure to exceed the masonry mass of the Great Pyramid of Giza".
Since everyone knows the pyramids were alien-made, not man made of course.
  #9  
Old 01-05-2019, 05:17 PM
MEBuckner's Avatar
MEBuckner MEBuckner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Posts: 11,825
I think that just raises the question:

Who (or WHAT) built the Hoover Dam?!?!!1!
  #10  
Old 01-05-2019, 05:53 PM
Riemann's Avatar
Riemann Riemann is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 6,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbh View Post
The biggest obstacle is financial.
How about the Inca pyramids? Surely Mexico would pay for that?
  #11  
Old 01-05-2019, 06:03 PM
jasg jasg is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 5,707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riemann View Post
How about the Inca pyramids? Surely Mexico would pay for that?
Why would Mexico pay for pyramids in Peru?
  #12  
Old 01-05-2019, 06:04 PM
Quartz's Avatar
Quartz Quartz is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Home of the haggis
Posts: 30,127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim B. View Post
But could we build them today?
Easily. A friend of mine took part in a partial reconstruction of Stonehenge - IIRC they built one trilithon somewhere entirely using ancient methods.
  #13  
Old 01-05-2019, 06:29 PM
Riemann's Avatar
Riemann Riemann is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 6,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasg View Post
Why would Mexico pay for pyramids in Peru?
You're saying they would exploit my ignorance of the location of pre-Columbian cultures to get out of paying? Typical.
  #14  
Old 01-05-2019, 06:32 PM
rat avatar's Avatar
rat avatar rat avatar is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Seattle, Wa
Posts: 5,324
Or more correctly, what we think the ancient methods were.

But that is a problem even on much shorter time scales, as an example NASA had to reverse engineer the F-1 engine used on Saturn V and Apollo just a few years ago, because a lot of critical knowledge was lost in just a few decades.
  #15  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:04 PM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 80,824
There is a sense in which it's true that we don't know how the ancient Egyptians built the pyramid. But that's just because we know of multiple ways they could have done it, and we don't know which one they went with. It's not like there's no known way they could have.

If we wanted to today, we could also spend tens of thousands of man-years on building them using the ancient methods. But of course, we could do it a lot more easily using modern methods. Or we could build structures far more impressive and far more practical than the pyramids, which the ancients couldn't have done at all.
  #16  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:10 PM
galen ubal galen ubal is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Central VIC Australia
Posts: 2,376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
There is a sense in which it's true that we don't know how the ancient Egyptians built the pyramid. But that's just because we know of multiple ways they could have done it, and we don't know which one they went with. It's not like there's no known way they could have.

<<snip>>.
It occurs to me that they probably did use several different methods - probably in the course of building any one pyramid, certainly over the history of pyramid building.
  #17  
Old 01-06-2019, 12:19 AM
Whack-a-Mole's Avatar
Whack-a-Mole Whack-a-Mole is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Posts: 20,449
I recall seeing (somewhere...I forget where) a TV show where a group of people sought to build a mini pyramid. Basically they wanted to see if they could do it with only tech that existed back in ancient Egypt. The pyramid was pretty small compared to the real thing but they showed it was possible to do (after overcoming some problems). Therefore going bigger was merely a matter of the will and resources to do it.
__________________
"I did not mean that Conservatives are generally stupid; I meant, that stupid persons are generally Conservative. I believe that to be so obvious and undeniable a fact that I hardly think any hon. Gentleman will question it." ~John Stuart Mill
  #18  
Old 01-06-2019, 04:01 AM
chappachula chappachula is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 5,571
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quartz View Post
they built one trilithon
okay, folks, let's be honest here.
Now, please, all of you fellow Dopers---- raise your hand if you knew the word trilithon .
And tell me when you last used it.

(yeah, I love this place. .......But sometimes it makes me feel kinda stoopid. )

Last edited by chappachula; 01-06-2019 at 04:03 AM.
  #19  
Old 01-06-2019, 04:13 AM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 15,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbh View Post
The biggest obstacle is financial.
So, what would it cost to build the great pyramid?
  #20  
Old 01-06-2019, 06:06 AM
Saffer Saffer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuelA View Post
Since everyone knows the pyramids were alien-made, not man made of course.

Just want to point out that even if we recognise that the pyramid of Giza was man made, it still doesn’t count as the first man made structure to exceed the masonry mass of the pyramid of Giza.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  #21  
Old 01-06-2019, 10:17 AM
ZonexandScout's Avatar
ZonexandScout ZonexandScout is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 1,275
I dropped back in to point out that the Egyptians (or aliens...take your pick) did not just get up one morning and say, "Hey! Let's see if we can build a huge pyramid."

They had built pyramids before...and some of them weren't up to our usual expectations. They had a lot of practice. ("Ooops! Guess we should have chosen a different angle for the sides.") And they didn't just cut out huge blocks at the quarry only to discover that they couldn't move them. They gradually figured out how to do it in the same way that cathedral builders figured out how to construct arches and flying buttresses.

(I really just posted because because I like to use the word "buttresses." It reminds me of Diana Rigg.)
  #22  
Old 01-06-2019, 10:30 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is online now
Domo Arigato Mister Moderato
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: On the run with Kilroy
Posts: 22,071
God I love the Internet.

$5 billion with a B.

https://www.livescience.com/18589-co...mid-today.html

I have some doubts about the assertion that it would be very difficult to build today but at least there's an estimate.

Hmm. $5B for a pyramid...$5B for a wall...

You don't think?
  #23  
Old 01-06-2019, 10:34 AM
CookingWithGas's Avatar
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Tysons Corner, VA, USA
Posts: 12,766
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
So, what would it cost to build the great pyramid?
By one estimate, it took a workforce of 6700 men 20 years to build Khufu. Under modern work schedules (which would be conservative) that is roughly 280 million man-hours. These were not all unskilled labor. If you use an average rate of $20/hour for masons, stone cutters, engineers, etc., it comes out to $5.6 billion, if we use the ancient methods.

It's amazing what achievement of impressive but useless architecture you can achieve in an absolute monarchy with religious fanaticism.
  #24  
Old 01-06-2019, 11:58 AM
dorvann dorvann is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 475
Personally I think we should find a way to build them better like when we built a replica of Stonehenge out of Cars:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carhenge
  #25  
Old 01-06-2019, 12:20 PM
Channing Idaho Banks's Avatar
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: beautiful Idaho
Posts: 2,608
if we built a bunch of pyramids we could charge People admission and use that money to pay for the wall.
  #26  
Old 01-06-2019, 01:06 PM
ftg's Avatar
ftg ftg is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 18,388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Channing Idaho Banks View Post
if we built a bunch of pyramids we could charge People admission and use that money to pay for the wall.
And we can also use them as granaries! Win-win.

I also think like ZonexandScout on the evolution of pyramids. Mudbrick -> stone mastabas -> step pyramids -> pyramids (-> some later shoddy pyramids).

When did the aliens (or amazing tech we still don't have) show up and when did they go away? And these aliens were really crappy builders based on some of the mistakes they made. Even the lower stones in the Great Pyramid started to crack and sag while it was being built requiring "adjustments" as it went higher. Nice pyramid engineering there Xqllyztur.
  #27  
Old 01-06-2019, 02:21 PM
dropzone's Avatar
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 29,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEBuckner View Post
I think that just raises the question:

Who (or WHAT) built the Hoover Dam?!?!!1!
Easy! Hoover the Talking Seal. It's right there in the name.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chappachula View Post
okay, folks, let's be honest here.
Now, please, all of you fellow Dopers---- raise your hand if you knew the word trilithon .
And tell me when you last used it.

(yeah, I love this place. .......But sometimes it makes me feel kinda stoopid. )
Another show of hands of thems what figured it out from context and will use it as soon as the occasion presents itself, even if you need to force it? And you're not stoopid. The geyser guy was stoooopid, with extra Os for stupidity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonexandScout View Post
(I really just posted because because I like to use the word "buttresses." It reminds me of Diana Rigg.)
As in butt caresses? I hadn't wondered if I were gay before I saw The (Real) Avengers in 1964. There was no question I was straight afterward.

Last edited by dropzone; 01-06-2019 at 02:24 PM.
  #28  
Old 01-06-2019, 02:23 PM
markn+ markn+ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: unknown; Speed: exactly 0
Posts: 1,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg View Post
And these aliens were really crappy builders based on some of the mistakes they made. Even the lower stones in the Great Pyramid started to crack and sag while it was being built requiring "adjustments" as it went higher. Nice pyramid engineering there Xqllyztur.
Look, the pyramids were all standing just fine while the antigravity generators that the aliens put in the heart of each pyramid were working. These partially compensated for the weight of the stones (of course their primary purpose was to facilitate the landing of alien spacecraft). The aliens left clear instructions (in hieroglyphics) about how to maintain the antigravity generators, which the ancient Egyptians incorporated into their religious rituals. But the disruption of the required rituals by Akhenaten caused the machines to break down, and that's what caused the partial collapse of many of the pyramids we see today. Geez, do your research, people!
  #29  
Old 01-06-2019, 02:42 PM
dropzone's Avatar
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 29,045
That Akhenaten was a PITA. Hot wife, though. Worked at a company where a salesoid was a pain but we kept him on because we liked his wife
  #30  
Old 01-06-2019, 02:48 PM
ZonexandScout's Avatar
ZonexandScout ZonexandScout is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 1,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by dropzone View Post
Easy! Hoover the Talking Seal. It's right there in the name.

Another show of hands of thems what figured it out from context and will use it as soon as the occasion presents itself, even if you need to force it? And you're not stoopid. The geyser guy was stoooopid, with extra Os for stupidity.

As in butt caresses? I hadn't wondered if I were gay before I saw The (Real) Avengers in 1964. There was no question I was straight afterward.
Close. From an article on her in The Telegraph in 2014:

"... considering the words [John] Simon [New York Magazine] used in 'covering' her nude scene in Abelard and Héloise (1970). 'Diana Rigg,' he wrote, 'is built like a brick mausoleum with insufficient flying buttresses.' "
  #31  
Old 01-06-2019, 03:22 PM
dropzone's Avatar
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 29,045
Isaac Asimov immortalized his need to see that show in one of his essays about something completely else. While it took a village to make Ms Rigg seem busty, there is nothing wrong with absolute perfection in a B cup.

Back on topic-ish, Sunday afternoon is a fine time to read a long thread: https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=742823
  #32  
Old 01-06-2019, 03:39 PM
Arkcon Arkcon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whack-a-Mole View Post
I recall seeing (somewhere...I forget where) a TV show where a group of people sought to build a mini pyramid. Basically they wanted to see if they could do it with only tech that existed back in ancient Egypt. The pyramid was pretty small compared to the real thing but they showed it was possible to do (after overcoming some problems). Therefore going bigger was merely a matter of the will and resources to do it.

That was a Nova program on PBS, I remember these well. Nova went through this "build it" phase before Mythbusters and other Discovery channel shows took the ball and started running with it. I'm guessing PBS stopped funding similar shows about that time.

Anyway, Nova built a mini-Pryamid, Nova raised a stone trilithon with just people and an A-frame. Nova tried to build Leonardo's ginormous crossbow, and Leonardo's hang-glider. Then Nova decided to give it a rest with the ancient engineering recreations.

So here's two funny ones: Some people in France, back in the 1980's were tired of the "obviously, aliens did it" with regard to their local stone circle. Id they got together with ropes, and log rollers and moves a stone as a village. And the next day, another stone had been stolen during the night. They had to rope off and guard their stone circle after that.

For number two, I was gonna find the Youtube clip from the movie "The 10 Commandments" where Charlton Heston raises the gigantic stone monolith with slave labor and sand, but ... there's more important monument smashing for YouTube to chronicle it seems, and you can all look up the monument building scene. Yeah, they even knew then, that the Ancient Egyptians were perfectly capable of building massive stone structures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CookingWithGas View Post
It's amazing what achievement of impressive but useless architecture you can achieve in an absolute monarchy with religious fanaticism.
I think there are a number of scholarly references to describe the life of Ancient Egypt as not being describe this way. People donated their time, when the season was not suitable for farming, and were paid for their work, in bread and beer. It wasn't slavish devotion to their religion or Pharaoh, it was just a thing to do, instead of doing nothing.

Last edited by Arkcon; 01-06-2019 at 03:40 PM.
  #33  
Old 01-06-2019, 10:00 PM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 80,824
[Moderating]

If you can't tell the difference between pyramids and female breasts, you need to spend less time on this board and get out more. This thread is about one of those two things, and not the other.
  #34  
Old 01-07-2019, 10:51 AM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 15,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Channing Idaho Banks View Post
if we built a bunch of pyramids we could charge People admission and use that money to pay for the wall.
The pyramids are tombs: are you suggesting that people would pay us to kill them and put them inside?
  #35  
Old 01-07-2019, 10:57 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 14,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkcon View Post

It wasn't slavish devotion to their religion or Pharaoh,...
Nobody expects the Egyptian Inquisition...!

======

But seriously...

Consensus as I recall was that they used a mud brick spiral ramp built up around the pyramid. If they'd used a straight regular ramp it would require as much or more material in gravel and such than the pyramid. There is no evidence of such rubble. The unfinished pyramid was a nice neat set of steps (blocks about 4 feet across) so it was easy to build the ramp on those using mud bricks and would not take anywhere near as much material and could be easily removed as they worked their way back down...

Incidentally, as they worked their way back down from the top, the ramp before removal would give a working base from which they would be putting on the final layer of limestone sheathing cut to a perfect smooth pyramid. (Most of this finish has fallen off, but on the middle pyramid at the top you can still see this finish). A straight ramp would have made finishing the back side fairly awkward.

Yes, as hinted at - the evolutionary path of pyramids is quite obvious. Early Egyptians (the first dynasties) built rectangular tombs (mastabas). Imhotep (allegedly the earliest non-ruler whose name we know) started by building his Pharoah's mastaba of stone. Then expanded it and built successive squares on top producing the first stone "step pyramid". From there they went to smooth edge pyramids, bigger and bigger until they realized with the "bent pyramid" that they were building it too steep. As cracks appeared in the construction they changed their minds and about halfway up may it a less steep angle.

The original step pyramid at Saqqarra was made with smaller construction stones, about a foot to two feet on a side. By the time the Great Pyramid was being built, they had realized that 4x4x6 foot blocks made construction go faster and were feasible to move. (As the empire declined, they took to cheap measures. The "Black pyramid" was a block stone shell and tomb core that was filled with rubble as it rose, rather than solid blocks. Today, all that's left is the middle core an a pile of that rubble.)

So the question is - build with today's tech, or as it was built in 2400BC? With today's tech, piece of cake. The old way? What do you have to pay people to do drudge work for a decade in the Egyptian sun? No be cheap. One statistic I saw said that working 20 years, 7 days a week, 12 hours a day, to build the great pyramid meant they laid a stone every 90 seconds. The important task is coordination.

The blocks would have been quarried with stone and copper chisels, and using wood wedges that swelled when wet to split the rock. Remember, this was over 1000 years before the iron age. Today, we have carbide power saws.

Arkon has it right. When the fields flooded, as they did every year, there was an entire country of those who had nothing else to do but haul stones for food - but not slaves. Meanwhile, the stone stockpiled during those two months could be finished and installed at leisure by a much smaller full time group of stoneworkers, who would be skilled paid craftsmen, not slaves.

There's a giant "cave church" (Google it) from the cliffs across the river in Cairo where it is believed many of the stones were quarried. So another task was to float the blocks across the river when the fields were flooded and transport is easy since the entire route was navigable right up to the worksite.
  #36  
Old 01-07-2019, 07:10 PM
ThisSpaceForRent's Avatar
ThisSpaceForRent ThisSpaceForRent is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: University City, MO
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Chance View Post
God I love the Internet.

$5 billion with a B.

https://www.livescience.com/18589-co...mid-today.html

I have some doubts about the assertion that it would be very difficult to build today but at least there's an estimate.

Hmm. $5B for a pyramid...$5B for a wall...

You don't think?
i would rather have a pyramid ....with unnamed co conspirator #! entombed ..

thisspaceforrent
  #37  
Old 01-07-2019, 07:22 PM
Chronos's Avatar
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 80,824
[Moderating again]

Let's also cut all of the talk about present-day politics. This isn't the place.
  #38  
Old 01-07-2019, 07:23 PM
dropzone's Avatar
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 29,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
[Moderating]

If you can't tell the difference between pyramids and female breasts, you need to spend less time on this board and get out more. This thread is about one of those two things, and not the other.
I would think the French beaver trappers who named the Grand Tetons got out more than any of us.
  #39  
Old 01-07-2019, 07:35 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 79,627
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEBuckner View Post
I think that just raises the question:

Who (or WHAT) built the Hoover Dam?!?!!1!
What else is named Hoover? Vacuums.

And what do aliens have to cross to reach Earth? Vacuum.

And what else builds dams? Beavers.

It all ties together. Except for that part about the beavers.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 01-07-2019 at 07:36 PM.
  #40  
Old 01-07-2019, 08:12 PM
MEBuckner's Avatar
MEBuckner MEBuckner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Posts: 11,825
Space Beavers!
  #41  
Old 01-08-2019, 08:14 AM
ftg's Avatar
ftg ftg is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 18,388
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEBuckner View Post
Space Beavers!
You mean Disco Beaver from Outer Space!

nsfw old National Lampoon HBO special:

  #42  
Old 01-09-2019, 11:23 PM
Kedikat Kedikat is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 455
I like the idea of carving an existing mountain into a pyramid. Crush up the waste rock and spread around the base to make a nice flat expanse around it.
Are there some already 4 sided hard rock mountains that are good candidates? At a glance, it seems a lot of mountains are more roughly three sided?

Next store can be the giant mountain with the roller coaster bolted to it.
  #43  
Old 01-10-2019, 01:44 AM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 9,187
Any mountain could be carved into a pyramid shape, the only question is how much would have to be carved away. You'd want to be careful with what type of mountain you used, though. Don't want to cut through multiple stratigraphic layers of widely different weatherability.
  #44  
Old 01-10-2019, 02:41 AM
Banksiaman Banksiaman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 844
If we're getting into carving mountains, why don't we just pick a vaguely four-sided geographical feature, and simply wish strongly that it was made by humans until it becomes true.

Its worked really well here.
  #45  
Old 01-10-2019, 05:51 AM
MrDibble's Avatar
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 24,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by chappachula View Post
raise your hand if you knew the word trilithon
*Raises hand*
Quote:
And tell me when you last used it.
In...maybe November? While discussing Neil Oliver's A History Of Ancient Britain series with my wife.
  #46  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:19 AM
GottaBeMeh GottaBeMeh is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Florida
Posts: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
The blocks would have been quarried with stone and copper chisels, and using wood wedges that swelled when wet to split the rock. Remember, this was over 1000 years before the iron age. Today, we have carbide power saws.
The blocks weren't quarried. They were form-poured concrete.
  #47  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:54 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 14,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaBeMeh View Post
The blocks weren't quarried. They were form-poured concrete.
I don't think they'd mastered the art of pouring solid limestone at the time.


BTW, the "carve away the mountain" is essentially what they are doing with Crazy Horse monument in South Dakota.
  #48  
Old 01-10-2019, 02:14 PM
GottaBeMeh GottaBeMeh is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Florida
Posts: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
I don't think they'd mastered the art of pouring solid limestone at the time.

BTW, the "carve away the mountain" is essentially what they are doing with Crazy Horse monument in South Dakota.
Actually they had. Apparently it's not a trivial matter to discern concrete from naturally occurring limestone deposits.

One of many articles on this...
https://www.rediff.com/news/2006/dec/01look.htm

Quote:
There's no way around it. The chemistry is well and truly different," Professor Hug told Science et Vie magazine. Their study is being published this month in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society. The pair used X-rays, a plasma torch and electron microscopes to compare small fragments from pyramids with stone from the Toura and Maadi quarries. They found "traces of a rapid chemical reaction which did not allow natural crystalisation. The reaction would be inexplicable if the stones were quarried, but perfectly comprehensible if one accepts that they were cast like concrete.
Also this explains quite well why the faces are so flat and why each block fits so perfectly with adjacent blocks.
  #49  
Old 01-10-2019, 03:51 PM
Banksiaman Banksiaman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 844
Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaBeMeh View Post
Actually they had. Apparently it's not a trivial matter to discern concrete from naturally occurring limestone deposits.

One of many articles on this...
https://www.rediff.com/news/2006/dec/01look.htm

Also this explains quite well why the faces are so flat and why each block fits so perfectly with adjacent blocks.
No, Davidovits' claims have been debunked by researchers who are looking at a broader spectrum of evidence than just chemical attributes.

Dipayan Jana has looked at the evidence in a very thorough and well-written study, which is also not behind a paywall for once.

The 'many articles' are essentially continual copy-paste iterations of D's basic claim.
  #50  
Old 01-10-2019, 04:02 PM
MrDibble's Avatar
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 24,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaBeMeh View Post
The blocks weren't quarried. They were form-poured concrete.
Wow. Amazing how they managed to get all those nummulites in there ...
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:43 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017