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Old 06-12-2019, 02:28 AM
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My Kids Hates Vegetables - What Should I Do?


Hello everyone!

I would just like to ask for some suggestions on how to help my kids eat vegetables. I've been trying to feed them variety of menus with veggies but they also leave them out and just eat the meat.

Any ideas?

Thank you so much in advanced!
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:37 AM
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How old are they and how long has this been going on?
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:48 AM
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I put vegetables like carrot and broccoli etc into the food processor to liquify them and then put it in with pancake mix and cook pancakes. Our little girl wont eat them otherwise.
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Old 06-12-2019, 04:11 AM
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It's so easy to hide vegies. Make some pastry rolls (a bit of minced meat and lots of grated carrots and zuucchinis) Or maybe cornish pasties. Seriously, if you haven't figured out a way to sneak vegies into your kid's food, you aren't trying very hard.

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Old 06-12-2019, 04:57 AM
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Bribery, begging, forcing, crying, daring, luck. Anyway that works.
The lil'wrekkers veggie appreciation was zip. I did all those things with very few happy results. She grew up anyway. She's 20yo and is still a picky eater.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:20 AM
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Quit buying unhealthy options or leave them where the kids can't find them. When they say they are hungry hand them a carrot or apple at them and say eat this. If they don't eat it then they really are not hungry and probably just bored. Explain that to them, that eating food isn't something you do just to have something to do. Try adding melted cheese to vegetables.

Last edited by Si Amigo; 06-12-2019 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:27 AM
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[Moderating]

Welcome to the SDMB, Squid_Baby. We have different forums for different sorts of threads. This question isn't really one with factual answers, so it doesn't really fit in General Questions. Ordinarily, requests for advice go in the IMHO forum, but since this is about food, and a lot of the answers are likely to involve recipes, I'll move it to Cafe Society, instead.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:33 AM
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I'd serve the kiddies meat only. Let them watch while the adults are enthusiastically eating vegetables along with the rest of the meal. Only give the children veggies as a reward.

My son was once afraid to swim.
The water made him wince.
Until I said he mustn't swim:
S'been swimmin' ever since!


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Old 06-12-2019, 07:44 AM
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Once this thread figures out the answer, let me know. Apparently I am just a big kid.

The majority of them taste terrible.


Why don't we have a puking emoji?
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by kambuckta View Post
It's so easy to hide vegies. Make some pastry rolls (a bit of minced meat and lots of grated carrots and zuucchinis) Or maybe cornish pasties. Seriously, if you haven't figured out a way to sneak vegies into your kid's food, you aren't trying very hard.

That's how I started out. Then, having them help with meal prep came next. Then, once my kids were old enough to reason with I asked them to really think about their food preferences. Eventually we had an agreement that any new food had to at least be tried. Once they tried a new food, if they could verbalize why they disliked the food, they never had to try it again. I think maybe they ended up just deciding it was easier to eat what was served.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:14 AM
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The podcast Gastropod did an episode on the concept of Tiny Tastes, where you give the kid a ridiculously tiny piece of food, like the size of a grain of rice every day for 14 days. If they eat it, they get a sticker. Apparently, the size is so small, it's actually very hard to assess taste or texture so often by the end of the 14 days, the kid wants a larger piece so that they can actually taste it and by that point they've become somewhat acclimated to eating the food. I don't have kids, but I think the idea's pretty cool.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:46 AM
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As a kid who hated vegetables I say you just leave him alone and let him eat what he wants. Turning dinner into torture was one of my worst experiences as a child.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:08 AM
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1) Do the adults in the house like vegetables?

If they see other people eating them as a treat, not as a chore, that's likely to be helpful.

2) Are the vegetables in question good ones?

Much of what's in the grocery stores is tasteless, or sometimes actively bad tasting; it was bred for tonnage per acre and shipping quality, and harvested at whatever stage allowed it to ship with the least losses, and with minimal regard to the weather (see below). The cooking technique may also be an issue -- some people like their vegetables, or some particular vegetables, well cooked; others like them almost raw.

3) Kids really do have different tastebuds than adults, and different people taste different things. There's a substance in cabbage family crops that some people taste hardly at all and others very strongly. Most of these crops will taste better if harvested in cold weather; but to a person with strong sensitivity to that particular flavor they may still taste bitter. And there are a lot of odd food sensitivities that people may grow out of, if they're not permanently repelled from the food by attempts to force them to eat it. Tomato sauces literally made me nauseated when I was a child; I love them now. My parents had a really good sense of the difference between a kid who really couldn't stand something and one who just wanted to get to dessert; I never had to have more than a taste of something new, and not even that of something I knew I couldn't stand -- though after watching the grownups eat it with enthusiasm, I would often ask for an occasional taste to find out if I still didn't like it. Usually, eventually, the answer was that the distaste had worn off -- though 'eventually' sometimes took a number of years.

4) If possible, try having them grow some things themselves. Not only will this give them greater investment in thw whole idea, but you can get better flavor. Select varieties for flavor as well as for ease of growth. There is simply no comparison between peas of a good-flavored variety fresh out of the garden and minimally cooked (if cooked at all, many kids and adults will just graze on them) and what you can get in the store.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:20 AM
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Much of what's in the grocery stores is tasteless,
See, this is why I like canned green beans better than home grown green beans.

The canned ones are more tasteless an can be covered by enough salt.

Home grown green beans taste even MORE like GREEN BEANS.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:20 AM
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It's so easy to hide vegies. Make some pastry rolls (a bit of minced meat and lots of grated carrots and zuucchinis) Or maybe cornish pasties. Seriously, if you haven't figured out a way to sneak vegies into your kid's food, you aren't trying very hard.

That absolutely wound't have worked for me. For starters, I was one of those people that could tell if you changed the brand of one of the ingredients. For example, if you used a different ketchup for meatloaf or spanish rice, I would have asked why it tasted different. No one was hiding anything in my food. If I bit into a pastie and noticed the bright orange or green (assuming it was something unwanted), I might try to pick around it, but I likely wouldn't have eaten it.

Second, and I understand this isn't the case for the vast majority of people...when I was younger their were a handful of vegetables and fruits I absolutely despised. Peas, green beans, apples and a few others. My mom insisted I was just being picky and I'd try and try to eat them and couldn't get them down. Found out about 30 years later I was allergic to them. Nothing serious, just oral allergy syndrome. I wasn't going to choke or die, they just made my throat itch.

IME, the best way to get a kid to try vegetables is to find a way to make it more palatable. If hiding it in food works, that's great, at least nutritionally. But I'd think you'd have a hard time getting them to eat it on their own. For me, it was about covering broccoli or cauliflower in cheese sauce. I still love broccoli and cauliflower, but don't have any interest in drowning it in cheese. Similar things for other vegetables, asparagus with butter and parmesan cheese, mashed potatoes with gravy, carrots with butter, salt and sugar. Again, for me, after eating the vegetables like that, it was no big deal to eat them without all the extras of mixed into a dish without picking around them.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:24 AM
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My way of dealing with it was to ignore it. Give them vitamins if you are worried, but the prevailing rule was "there's dinner, take it or leave it" and don't replace it with anything.

Both my kids are now healthy, vegetable-eating adults, and dinner time was a lot more pleasant. YMMV, which it always does with kids.

Regards,
Shodan
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:25 AM
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And there are a lot of odd food sensitivities that people may grow out of, if they're not permanently repelled from the food by attempts to force them to eat it.
I mentioned in my previous post that I had/have a bunch of [mild] food allergies to certain fruits and vegetables. It's had ramifications throughout my life. I've been doing allergy shots for unrelated reasons for a few years now. A while back I tried a bite of an apples and I was surprised my throat didn't itch. However, I still can't bring myself to eat one. In fact, I don't eat any [raw] fruit at all. Fruit flavored is fine, cooked (as in jelly) is fine. At this point I think it's mostly a texture thing.

OTOH, while I still actively dislike the taste of green beans and peas, I like vegetables. But again, they have to be cooked. For example, I could eat cooked carrots all day, but can't stand the taste of raw carrots.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:30 AM
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That absolutely wound't have worked for me. For starters, I was one of those people that could tell if you changed the brand of one of the ingredients.
Li'lbro?


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when I was younger their were a handful of vegetables and fruits I absolutely despised.---- Found out about 30 years later I was allergic to them.
Wait… me? No allergies to fruits that I know of, but it turns out my list of food sensitivities matches almost exactly the list of stuff I hated when I was little. I'm not sure whether the lack of swiss chard and cauliflower in the list of sensitivities is due to not having one, or of those two not being part of the test. Note that there were other veggies I'd eat happily, and that while there are many fruits I don't like or even dislike I was perfectly happy to chomp my way through a Granny Smith or Golden apple, or to eat half a kilo of pears in one sitting. Doctor Imaz is and will always be one of my personal heroes because he told my mother to stop trying to feed me the few items I hated and instead pile up the alternatives I had no problem with.

In my case, also add the "how can you call that cooking" option. I've always considered that boiling carrots was an abomination unto the carrot (ok, that solves it: Joey P and I are not each other's socks): turns out I prefer vegetables parboiled or sautéed, where my mother was in the "boil them till they're grey mush" field.
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Last edited by Nava; 06-12-2019 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:01 AM
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You can try serving them veggies first, the meat comes after they finish the veggies, but I would do a smaller veggie portion. Transition to them eating the veggies first on the same plate of their meat, letting them know it's better to get the stuff they don't like that much down first so they can enjoy the parts they like. But I would also keep the portions adjusted to their likely.

However they might just learn to cook for themselves and cook what they want, Which if they are so driven I'd let them eat as they wish, there is probably a reason if they are so driven to do so.

Last edited by kanicbird; 06-12-2019 at 10:03 AM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:18 AM
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My way of dealing with it was to ignore it. Give them vitamins if you are worried, but the prevailing rule was "there's dinner, take it or leave it" and don't replace it with anything.

Both my kids are now healthy, vegetable-eating adults, and dinner time was a lot more pleasant. YMMV, which it always does with kids.

Regards,
Shodan
This is my view, as well. I grew up eating anything and everything on my plate. I don't remember being forced to eat veggies, but I never got a choice with what I could eat. It was "take it or leave it."

That said, with my kids (5 and 3), they've gotten to be picky eaters (which is somewhat disappointing, as the older one started out a complete omnivore and surprising me with the extent of her palate, and the younger one now has taken her cues from the older one). So I don't force vegetables, and I can't really hid them. Anything with a speck of green in it: it could be vegetable, it could be a little bit of parsley or dill, etc., and they will complain and not eat it. (The younger one might with a little coaxing if older one is not around.) I'm just happy if they get some protein in their diet, and I figure the rest will take care of itself. And they like their fruit, so there is that (and I can get each of them to sometimes ingest a vegetable; the younger one likes squash, and the older one sometimes will eat cauliflower or carrots.) But I don't see anything to be gained by forcing it. As long as they get their nutrition otherwise, I'm fine with it.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:20 AM
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Have you considered trying to cook them better? There is a vast difference in range and quality of how tasty veggies can be based on how you cook them.

For example people boil brussel sprouts and then wonder why they taste like crap. Those things needs some char on them and need some good roasting to bring out the flavor. Carrots have a ton of opportunity but also need some real heat to get a char going (try with some white miso on top).
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:55 AM
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I'd serve the kiddies meat only. Let them watch while the adults are enthusiastically eating vegetables along with the rest of the meal....
Ah, yesssss...the ol’ Bread and Jam for Frances trick. Diabolical.

Any lightly steamed green veg can be rendered palatable by drizzling good olive oil over, a few dashes of Kosher salt, and a couple squeezes of fresh lemon juice. Doin’ it Greek-style.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:03 AM
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Have you considered trying to cook them better? There is a vast difference in range and quality of how tasty veggies can be based on how you cook them.
As mentioned before, kids really do have a different sense of taste than adults. More sensitive. But it's aroma and appearance too, especially as it relates to how it's prepared.

When I was very young, I disliked most vegetables. I thought it was just the way it was. Turns out that my mother was just a horrible cook ( back then ), as I was to find out as my world expanded and exposure to other's food preparation increased.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:04 AM
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There are whole books and websites on sneaking vegetables into kids diets, but most pediatricians say don't make a BFD out of it. *My friend had a '3-bites' rule for her kids, before they could get desert, three bites of green beans, broccoli, carrots.) Most kids like fruit, you could give them slices of apple or canned peaches, for the sake of their bowels. Make a smoothie with some bland tasting vegetables, pulverized and disguised with the taste of banana or chocolate frozen yogurt,
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:10 AM
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Never force food on a child. You are setting them up for more problems with that approach.

They like meat? Put a small portion of veggies on the plate and cover it with meat. M SIL did tis with her picky kid, and the kid loves veggies covered with meat juice.

Try scrambled eggs with veggies and cheese.

Last edited by Annie-Xmas; 06-12-2019 at 11:11 AM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:16 AM
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As a kid who hated vegetables I say you just leave him alone and let him eat what he wants. Turning dinner into torture was one of my worst experiences as a child.
Ditto this. Except for the mealtime torture part--there wasn't any.

Whether I ate or didn't eat something was NEVER an issue. My mother would make BLTs and I'd take out the lettuce. She'd make stuff cabbage, and I'd just eat the filling. Same with stuffed green peppers-- I'd just eat the filling. She never said anything, and it was NEVER an issue. Now I love all veggies and will eat any of them (except cilantro). This is not a battle worth fighting. IMHO.

Carry on.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:20 AM
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Don't make a big deal about it. Keep trying different vegetables and ways of preparing them.

Do they like potatoes? It's hard for me to believe anyone doesn't like potatoes but they get short shrift as vegetables when they are quite nutritious. How about tofu? It's a sponge that you can make taste like anything.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:24 AM
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Puree them up into yummy soups and sauces that cover the meat...think about beef stew or chicken stew with vegetable stock, blended carrots, onions, squash, etc. Pot pies. Make meatballs and meatloaf with veggie filler (oats, carrots, etc).

My kid refuses to eat any meat. I do the reverse to get her some meat protein, like pureed meat or fish to spread on her fresh strawberries. Gross to an adult, but heaven to a 1-year old.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:47 AM
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I was a picky eater kid. My mom didn't force me to eat food I didn't want, but she didn't make alternative food for me. If I didn't want the veggies I didn't have to eat them, but I didn't have a second choice. I'm still alive and healthy at age 62. There are only a few vegetables that I really like, and I'd be happy to never eat another vegetable.
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:02 PM
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Your children might prefer them raw. Offer a plate of carrot sticks, celery sticks, broccoli florets, grape tomatoes, summer squash, grape tomatoes, sugar snap peas, etc. as snacks or with a meal. You can serve yogurt dip or hummus with them.
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:09 PM
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Try making "sludge." Ad 1/2 of a can of water to a can of soup. Heat to boiling. Take off heat and add a four serving package of instant mashed potatoes. Serve and eat. Any flavor soup and potatoes work fine together.

My mother used to make it, and we all loved it. And my sister's kids and grandkids and my borther's kid love it.
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:24 PM
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1) They can't do or say anything that would be insulting to the cook
2) They have to try everything (and see step 1, no spitting it out, or dramatics)
3) The fruit doesn't go on the table until they've eaten a good meal ("You didn't like the beans, that's too bad, have a few more bites of meat and few more bites of potatoes while I slice an apple.")
4) Don't set them up for failure. I won't cook them an entirely different meal but if we're having fajitas I'll make a quesadilla and put a small amount of the spicier veggies and meat on the side.
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:36 PM
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Show them on youtube how they kill and carve up a cow ?
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:39 PM
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I mean how the cows are killed and carved up
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Old 06-12-2019, 01:05 PM
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My kid didn't like meat besides tenders, nuggets and fish sticks, and didn't like green veggies or really any vegetables. I never gave up offering veggies, trying new ways to serve them and made sure we modeled good eating habits. Her friends would see she avoided meat and called her a vegetarian like it was an insult and she felt insulted too!

Well, college vegan friends opened up her world to veggies and vegan options. The kid is a bone fide vegetarian now, loves all manner of veggies though not big on green salads. Squash, legumes, kale, chard, spinach, chickpeas, chia seeds she even loves brussels sprouts, ( I like em too but I don't love them like she does now) Helps that the kid can cook, and likes to spice it up. Her soups are amazing and casseroles take the centerplace on our table when she visits.

Your kid may out grow here aversion or may not but she'll survive. Ignore the chest thumping proud parents who kids eat everything and never pick over their food.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:16 PM
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There's a couple of different things that might work, or might be going on:

1) Turns out a lot of the stuff I didn't like when I was a kid I was actually allergic to. Well, yeah, if eating something makes you ill odds are you aren't going to like eating it. (Unfortunately, as time went by and my immune system decided to object to more and more stuff there is now a list of stuff I do in fact like but can't eat any more unless I want to risk spending the night in the hospital.)

2) It's the way it's cooked (or not cooked). Kids don't like raw vegees? Try steamed. Or a sauce over them. Kids don't like cooked vegetables? Try them raw. (My late spouse used to like raw turnips, as just one example) Try different sauces.

3) You kid might be a "supertaster" of some sort. There are people to whom the entire cabbage family tastes horribly bitter. There are people (I'm one of them) to whom cilantro tastes like Pine Sol floor cleaner. You're not going to convince such people to like that stuff that tastes like soap or worse. So try different vegetables from a very different family of plants.

4) The kid just doesn't like vegetables. So try fruit. This can also work in reverse, as some people don't like fruit.

I'd say keep trying, observe to make sure this isn't a case of something making the kid feel like crap, and if all else fails apply vitamins. Kids can survive a less than perfect diet, it's more important to not give them eating disorders. If they do have an eating disorder or intractable food/vitamin deficiency then seek actual professional help and not advice from random strangers on an internet message board.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:19 PM
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Smack them with a Bible when they refuse?

(Ha, ha! Just kidding!)
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:24 PM
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The cooking technique may also be an issue -- some people like their vegetables, or some particular vegetables, well cooked; others like them almost raw.
This is the first thing that crossed my mind as well. For the most part I would rather eat raw or lightly steamed veggies.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:40 PM
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Serve your kids vegetables that have a pleasant texture. The tops of broccoli can feel weird. Mushy stuff like cooked zucchini will often be rejected because of the mouth feel (that's why I don't like it).

Consider serving raw veggies since they often have a better texture and more subtle taste. Raw zucchini, butternut squash, cauliflower, carrots and beets are good choices.

Roast vegetables like broccoli, brussel sprouts, and kale. Toss them with a little olive oil and salt and put them in the oven at 425 until they start to blacken and they taste great.

Make soups with spaghetti squash instead of pasta.

Serve smaller servings of the meat so they can't fill up on it and will have to eat their veggies.

Put a party plate of raw vegetables out on the counter while you make dinner for the kids to snack on until dinner is ready.

Instead of regular potatoes, serve sweet potatoes.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:41 PM
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Beat them with sticks.

Or-- feed them the food and what they eat they eat and what they don't they don't. My kids went through about a million phases growing up. One didn't like anything colored green when they were 6. One decided they wanted pancakes, waffles and French toast un-adorned (not even butter!) for all of his elementary school years. They both didn't like steak for a very long time (too chewy, they said). They would hate peas one day and love them the next. Couldn't keep up with their likes and dislikes most of the time.

Ask them what they would like and try to keep their tastes in mind as much as is practical but make the food and give it to them. Always give them choices. If they don't like some of it, then fine. They will not starve themselves even though it may seem like that sometimes.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:43 PM
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Salad Frosting?
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by neutro View Post
Have you considered trying to cook them better? There is a vast difference in range and quality of how tasty veggies can be based on how you cook them.

For example people boil brussel sprouts and then wonder why they taste like crap. Those things needs some char on them and need some good roasting to bring out the flavor. Carrots have a ton of opportunity but also need some real heat to get a char going (try with some white miso on top).
I hate char and always have. I understand that some people like their food burned; I don't understand why.

Which is not to say that it's not worth trying charring things for a picky eater if you haven't been doing so -- they are not me and might like it that way. But if that's what you've been doing, then try not doing that. There is a vast difference in range of how different people like their food cooked.

(I do like brussels sprouts roasted; but I don't like them charred. I also like them cooked in a bit of water with a bit of butter and salt, tight lid on the pot so they partly steam. I don't like them boiled for long periods of time in large quantities of water; but some people might.)


Joey P, I didn't really mean food sensitivity in the modern sense, at least I don't think so. The tomato sauce not only didn't cause an allergic reaction, it didn't cause any physical symptoms that I know of other than that I just couldn't get the stuff down. I just found something about the flavor nauseating (though I could eat raw tomatoes just fine, and liked them). There were other things I had texture issues with, which have lessened with age but are to some extent still there. Again if they did go down they didn't cause problems, but I didn't/don't want that texture in my mouth.
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Old 06-12-2019, 03:24 PM
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Ah, yesssss...the ol’ Bread and Jam for Frances trick. Diabolical.

Any lightly steamed green veg can be rendered palatable by drizzling good olive oil over, a few dashes of Kosher salt, and a couple squeezes of fresh lemon juice. Doin’ it Greek-style.
or balsamic vinegar, flaked fleur de sel and olive oil or butter =) though we have been doing nut oils and avocado oil as well. Beets respond well to a gentle sprinkle of a pinch of turbinado sugar, balsamic vinegar and butter.
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:20 PM
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for the op, avoid green veggies, and radishes, go with carrots, and other more colorful veggies,

have the child help prepare dinner, some veggies go fabulously well in mac n cheese,

pick a different battle to fight cause you aren't going to win this one and will just end up making mealtime torture and stressful and breed resentment about food in your kid(s)

let the kids choose what to have for dinner sometimes

this is what I did to not only get my son to eat veggies, but to keep my stress down.
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Last edited by DorkVader; 06-12-2019 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:25 PM
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I myself always liked most veggies, and have never had kids. So I can't talk from that side of things. But I can talk from some experiences I have had.

For spinach, cook it with an egg. I always wondered why everyone else hate spinach as a kid. Then I got a can as an adult and wondered why it wasn't nearly as good as I remembered. Turns out, both my grandparents and my mom always cooked the canned variety with an egg thrown in--one egg for two cans of spinach.

I also suggest using kid-friendly veggies. As a kid, I noticed that there were certain veggies that most kids seemed to like. Carrots are the go-to, both cooked and raw. Iceberg lettuce is also often a favorite. While I never liked it, celery with peanut butter was one that kids adored. They often tended to like bell peppers, too. Corn is often a favorite, especially on the cob with butter. And, thanks to all the sauce, you can often get away with spaghetti squash, which is actually two veggies.

Don't be afraid to just keep trying others, too. My cousin was not much of a veggie eater. But, for some reason, he stumbled onto canned green peas and absolutely adored them. He would even eat them as a meal just by themselves.

And, finally, the trick a lot of chefs at restaurants know: add butter. It works on adults, and it works on kids. I'm pretty sure all of those cans of green pees had at least a pat of butter in them.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:31 PM
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Beets respond well to a gentle sprinkle of a pinch of turbinado sugar, balsamic vinegar and butter.
Cold pickled beets for summer weather! Who doesn’t love pickled beets? And you can use the leftover cooking water to pickle eggs!

Minestrone and other mixed-vegetable soups are a good way to force veggies down their rotten little throats. If they don’t like looking at the vegetables, make potage a la bonne femme (housewife soup) out of potatoes, leeks, onions, celery, carrots, (anything else), and chicken stock, then purée into a smooth soup. Everybody likes that.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:45 PM
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Tell the kiddo they are forbidden for him to eat, or that he can oly have them if it is a special occasion. Pretty soon he will be sneaking the carrots out of the fridge.

Not quite the same, when I was almost five, and started Sunday School, I am told I behaved badly. Imagine that. So my dad told me I could not go to SS, I would never get to be in the Christmas program, or have the goodies. Dad tells me after that I wanted to go. I do not actually remember this, but it sounds like me.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:50 PM
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Once this thread figures out the answer, let me know. Apparently I am just a big kid.

The majority of them taste terrible.


Why don't we have a puking emoji?
Why don't we have a "like" or "upvote" function?

Just let the kid eat what they want (within reason, I mean, nothing but candy and ice cream isn't going to help anyone, but if they want meat more than broccoli, let them roll with it) The things my mom made me eat that I didn't want to, like peas and green beans, I still loathe decades later. The stuff she never made me eat, like onions and peppers, those I eventually came to like enough that I even eat them now when I don't need to.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:02 PM
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My son is really picky but I've found since i have always added spinach to so many things like lasagna, eggs, any noodle dish, and rice dishes since he was little he can now eat it with just a little seasoning and maybe a stir of cream. We love a spoonful of spinach and parmesan smeared on crusty buttered French bread as a meal now.

He's never liked cabbage but he would eat egg rolls on the buffet so I learned how to make them at home easily, just using bagged slaw mix, egg roll wrappers, and a few seasonings I know he'll tolerate. We roll them together and bake them instead of frying so they're much healthier. I used to add ground pork but last time I didn't add any meat at all and they were just as good. So that covers cabbage and carrots. I tried this with broccoli slaw but it did not end well.

Broccoli is funny. He won't eat the stems at all, just the very tops of the "trees". SO the dogs and I eat a lot of stems. I add a thin cheese sauce and milk with some powdered chicken bouillon. He loves it and says my broccoli is the best.

Tomatoes he won't touch raw, so I get a good brand of crushed and cook my own sauces.
Potatoes are easy. He'll eat any potato dish. But sweets must be candied with marshmallows. I've tried roasting them with various seasoning. He won't touch them. Then again I wouldn't either until I was an adult.

That's pretty much all he'll eat as far as vegetables go. He won't touch corn even in corn bread or fritters. No asparagus, cauliflower (which I can't tolerate either), or Brussels sprouts (Yes I've tried them roasted.) He won't touch any common squash, although I can get him to eat pumpkin as long as it's made in to a pie or bread. Zucchini bread works too, although it's really not much zucchini compared to the sugar content. But if you're just trying to get a vegetable in them, I guess that's worth considering.

Last edited by Rushgeekgirl; 06-12-2019 at 09:03 PM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:27 PM
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I always liked veggies, but my younger sister to this day basically refuses all cooked veggies and is a picky eater in all sorts of other ways. Her husband is the same way. However, their son ADORES veggies, tofu, and yogurt - my mom has fed them to him since he was a baby. Tom Scud's theory is that for him, fresh vegetables were the treats he ate at Grandma's house. Maybe you can find some way to work that angle into your diabolical plan.
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