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Old 05-17-2020, 08:36 AM
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What happened to iodized salt?


I just noticed that all of the salt in the grocery store has a label that says it does not contain iodide. It used to be that all plain ol' salt was iodized. Now the Morton's girl no longer gives me this essential nutrient.

What happened?
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:39 AM
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There was a run on iodized salt and back filled the shelf with non-iodized salt?
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:18 AM
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Just panicked and checked my container, which says "Morton Iodized Salt".

Thank god, otherwise I'd soon have a goiter the size of Indiana.

Maybe Morton's has a sideline of non-iodized salt for the iodine-hesitant.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:43 AM
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Normally the supermarkets have Morton's salt (and usually other brands) in those cylindrical container, in both iodized and non-iodized varieties. The crisis has meant weird stocking issues with stuff you wouldn't expect in the supermarkets and big box stores, which may be why you're not seeing iodized salt right now.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:45 AM
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Sea salt generally isn't iodized. I have found Morton's iodized sea salt in the familiar cylindrical container, but it was also fine grained, and generally with sea salt you're going for the coarser texture so I never bothered to get it again. If normal everyday iodized table salt is missing from the shelves, that's probably a fluke or a Covid-19 related run on it. Nevertheless, I think the rise in popularity of sea salt and Himalayan varieties just means those are taking up relatively more shelf space.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:54 AM
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Non iodized salt is preferred for pickling and canning. Iodized salt can cause weird colors and has anti caking additives. My household has done several batches of pickling since shelter in place orders. Eggs, onions, jalapeños, cuke’s, garlic.
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:08 AM
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Maybe it's a temporary supply thing but it doesn't make sense to me. The store has lots of Morton's a store brand salt--cases of the latter--but all of it is non-iodized. And Chela, this variety also has non-caking additive.
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:41 PM
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With a medically significant thing like this, the answer is often "morons." Why is the vaccination rate falling? Morons. Why are people complaining about floridation of water? Morons. Why is there opposition to GMOs? Morons. So I wouldn't be suprised if morons have decided iodine is bad and the market is supporting them.
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
With a medically significant thing like this, the answer is often "morons." Why is the vaccination rate falling? Morons. Why are people complaining about floridation of water? Morons. Why is there opposition to GMOs? Morons. So I wouldn't be suprised if morons have decided iodine is bad and the market is supporting them.

Or rather it may have been that it was due to the person who ordered a pallet of the wrong salt?
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:55 PM
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With a medically significant thing like this, the answer is often "morons.
Dangit Darren. I was going to say that! "Clean eating" is a disturbing trend. The salt that we "eat" isn't natural to begin with. I hardly see how adding necessary iodine to salt makes things worse (or "less natural").

Link: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-Consumer/

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Iodine is a mineral found in some foods. The body needs iodine to make thyroid hormones. These hormones control the body’s metabolism and many other important functions. The body also needs thyroid hormones for proper bone and brain development during pregnancy and infancy. Getting enough iodine is important for everyone, especially infants and women who are pregnant.
Feel free to look up hypothyroidism for people who think this isn't a big deal.

Just to add how disturbing that trend is: vegans are often iodine-deficient, and veganism has become more popular (though the rate of increase is exaggerated). Not all plant milks are fortified with B12 either, but that is unnatural and therefore "wrong".

We live in a society where people want to drink raw milk, or raw water (thankfully not too many people!) or not feed their children properly because their naturopath "knows better" and "doctors don't understand nutrition". That's terrible, but doing this stealthily is worse. (I'm going to assume the salt shaker didn't scream "natural, no iodine!" on it.)
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:57 PM
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Kosher salt seems to be a current thing with foodie types (with the exception of Cook's Illustrated/Cook's Country which seems to be just ducky with iodine). Kosher salt is coarser but breaks into tinier pieces when crushed, unlike sea salt which is one large grain of salt. (and neither sea nor kosher have iodine. Sorry, talk about burying the lede.)

While it appears to be possible to overdose on iodine especially if your diet includes a lot of seaweed and other iodine-rich foods, it's not very common in the US. I'd guess that you'd probably have high-sodium issues with iodized salt way before you'd have iodine issues. So if there is a no-iodine movement in the US, it probably does come down to Darren Garrison's "morons" theory.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:06 PM
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If you add iodine to kosher salt, is it still kosher? (Serious question here.)

I had kosher salt once, probably ten years ago. It looked like flakes.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:06 PM
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Some people taste a difference in iodized salt, esp in larger quantities, so prefer not to use it in cooking. Not because of misplaced health concerns. I've never taste-tested it, myself.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Kimera757 View Post
If you add iodine to kosher salt, is it still kosher? (Serious question here.)
Yes, all salt is kosher, whether iodized or not. Kosher salt is a misnomer. It's called that because it's the type of salt traditionally used for drying kosher meats.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:18 PM
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Dangit Darren. I was going to say that! "Clean eating" is a disturbing trend. The salt that we "eat" isn't natural to begin with. I hardly see how adding necessary iodine to salt makes things worse (or "less natural").

Link: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-Consumer/



Feel free to look up hypothyroidism for people who think this isn't a big deal.

Just to add how disturbing that trend is: vegans are often iodine-deficient, and veganism has become more popular (though the rate of increase is exaggerated). Not all plant milks are fortified with B12 either, but that is unnatural and therefore "wrong".

We live in a society where people want to drink raw milk, or raw water (thankfully not too many people!) or not feed their children properly because their naturopath "knows better" and "doctors don't understand nutrition". That's terrible, but doing this stealthily is worse. (I'm going to assume the salt shaker didn't scream "natural, no iodine!" on it.)
Where did humans get iodine before it was added to table salt?
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:21 PM
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Where did humans get iodine before it was added to table salt?
Meat. Fish and seaweed have an even higher amount of iodine.

Here's a referenced list: https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/...-in-iodine.php

Last edited by Kimera757; 05-17-2020 at 01:21 PM.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:29 PM
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Or rather it may have been that it was due to the person who ordered a pallet of the wrong salt?
That still sounds like a "moron" situation...
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:31 PM
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Meat. Fish and seaweed have an even higher amount of iodine.

Here's a referenced list: https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/...-in-iodine.php
According to their data, the US is taking in too much iodine--doesn't surprise me much. Me, I use kosher salt and eat fish and sushi, not too worried about iodine deficiency.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:33 PM
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Yes, all salt is kosher, whether iodized or not.

If the source of iodine in the salt is shellfish how could the salt be Kosher?
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:43 PM
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If mom has insufficient iodine in her, her baby may have a dysfunctional thyroid gland even before birth. This can result in Congenital iodine deficiency syndrome.

Congenital iodine deficiency syndrome is the current technical term for Cretinism.

Many cretins have IQs of between 51-70. This range of IQ was the medical definition of Moron, decades ago, before the word 'Moron' became a perjorative.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:48 PM
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If the source of iodine in the salt is shellfish how could the salt be Kosher?
Shellfish contain iodine because they live in seawater, which is relatively rich in dissolved iodine. Most sea salts contain some iodine. Which is why folks living near the sea rarely had iodine deficiency, as their salt had some, as did kelp, and local seafood.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:52 PM
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Yes, all salt is kosher, whether iodized or not. Kosher salt is a misnomer. It's called that because it's the type of salt traditionally used for drying kosher meats.
Iodized salt has some dextrose as a vehicle and stabilizer for the iodine. The dextrose is not kosher for Passover. Iodine is not a problem but the carrier is.
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Old 05-17-2020, 02:18 PM
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Eggs, onions, jalapeños, cuke’s, garlic.
I am very curious, how do you use pickled garlic? I am pretty sure I have never tried it.
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Old 05-17-2020, 02:22 PM
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Kosher salt seems to be a current thing with foodie types (with the exception of Cook's Illustrated/Cook's Country which seems to be just ducky with iodine). Kosher salt is coarser but breaks into tinier pieces when crushed, unlike sea salt which is one large grain of salt. (and neither sea nor kosher have iodine. Sorry, talk about burying the lede.)
It's not some kind of dumb foodie thing; it's more that kosher salt's larger and rougher grains are easier to pick up with your fingers and add manually than table salt.

In other words, if you're salting to taste, it's easier to pick up and manipulate the kosher salt than it is table salt, which tends to be harder to pick up in any quantity, and harder to control as you sprinkle it.
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Old 05-17-2020, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
With a medically significant thing like this, the answer is often "morons." Why is the vaccination rate falling? Morons. Why are people complaining about floridation of water? Morons. Why is there opposition to GMOs? Morons. So I wouldn't be suprised if morons have decided iodine is bad and the market is supporting them.
Well cookbooks and cooking shows often specify Kosher salt or sea salt instead of iodized salt. In a clear broth you might be able to tell the difference.
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Old 05-17-2020, 02:41 PM
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With a medically significant thing like this, the answer is often "morons." Why is the vaccination rate falling? Morons. Why are people complaining about floridation of water? Morons. Why is there opposition to GMOs? Morons. So I wouldn't be suprised if morons have decided iodine is bad and the market is supporting them.
So-called "iodized salt" is a Communist plot to sap and impurify our precious bodily fluids!!1!

WAKE UP, SHEEPLE!!¡!
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Old 05-17-2020, 02:48 PM
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What is Non-GMO Salt?


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Salt, an ingredient that spans nearly every food category, is no exception when it comes to non-GMO skepticism. Megan Swartz, Food Science Lead at Cargill Salt explained, “as the consumer demand for non-GMO products grows, we continue to receive more customer requests for salt that is non-GMO.”
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:07 PM
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I am very curious, how do you use pickled garlic? I am pretty sure I have never tried it.
Eat it straight up, tangy!
However you like it, add to a salad A sauté, in sauce, on condiment plate.
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:15 PM
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So-called "iodized salt" is a Communist plot to sap and impurify our precious bodily fluids!!1!

WAKE UP, SHEEPLE!!¡!
So if their semen tastes 'salty', they are in the process of being taken over by Communist subversion? Or even already turned into a Communist sympathizer? Horrors!
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:22 PM
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If mom has insufficient iodine in her, her baby may have a dysfunctional thyroid gland even before birth. This can result in Congenital iodine deficiency syndrome.

Congenital iodine deficiency syndrome is the current technical term for Cretinism.

Many cretins have IQs of between 51-70. This range of IQ was the medical definition of Moron, decades ago, before the word 'Moron' became a perjorative.
They often look like they have Down Syndrome, and back in the days before we knew what DS really was, babies whose diagnosis were uncertain were often given thyroid hormone, and if they improved, they probably didn't have DS. (DS people often have thyroid issues as well, which is another story.)

A while back, I saw a show on IIRC PBS that was about a remote mountain clinic in the Andes that still saw people with cretinism, and that's why every pregnant woman who came to the clinic got an injection of iodine in oil, so it would slowly release. David Letterman's mother's cause celebre was iodination of salt, because she was old enough to remember people with goiters when she was growing up in Indiana.

The American diet is usually good enough, iodine-wise, to prevent this. If you're REALLY worried about getting enough iodine, Centrum vitamins contain it.
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:24 PM
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There was a run on iodized salt and back filled the shelf with non-iodized salt?
p.s. This is the most likely scenario.
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:33 PM
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Kosher salt seems to be a current thing with foodie types (with the exception of Cook's Illustrated/Cook's Country which seems to be just ducky with iodine). Kosher salt is coarser but breaks into tinier pieces when crushed, unlike sea salt which is one large grain of salt. (and neither sea nor kosher have iodine. Sorry, talk about burying the lede.)
Without looking, I feel that Cook's Illustrated usually calls for Kosher salt. In part I think it's because Kosher salt is less salty per volume than ordinary table salt so it's harder to oversalt. I know their brine recipes call for Kosher salt and if memory serves they call for more Diamond salt and less Morton's Kosher in the same volume of water because Diamond is less salty.
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:35 PM
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So-called "iodized salt" is a Communist plot to sap and impurify our precious bodily fluids!!1!

WAKE UP, SHEEPLE!!¡!
So if their semen tastes 'salty', they are in the process of being taken over by Communist subversion? Or even already turned into a Communist sympathizer? Horrors!
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Old 05-17-2020, 04:44 PM
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Are any other foodstuffs iodized besides salt? If you're not using iodized salt (for whatever reason) then it seems like the only other supplements out there are kelp, which is of questionable quality and efficacy. Beyond that you're looking at fish, seaweed (which has a massive amount), and to a lesser extent dairy products. Potassium iodide does not appear to be available as an OTC supplement, its use is limited to a radiation treatment for nuclear accidents or bombs.

Something else to consider is that the amount of iodine we get from salt is apparently pretty low, because 70% of our salt intake is from processed foods, which almost never use iodized salt, and another 15% comes from naturally salty foods. Only the last 10-15% comes from salt added during cooking or on the table. You need 1/2 teaspoon a day of table salt to get the recommended amount of iodine, but that's half your total allotment of salt. With so much coming from other sources, those numbers don't work.
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Old 05-17-2020, 04:56 PM
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Shellfish contain iodine because they live in seawater, which is relatively rich in dissolved iodine. Most sea salts contain some iodine. Which is why folks living near the sea rarely had iodine deficiency, as their salt had some, as did kelp, and local seafood.
Even if you're relatively close to the sea, if you don't live near sea level but at high altitudes (e.g. Piedmont in Italy), you are at risk of iodine deficiency and goitre.

I once saw an old painting of an Alpine family where not only did everyone have a goitre, but the dog had one too. Wish I could find it online.

Instead, here's a 17th century carving from Piedmont that would upset Elaine Benes. It's from a relatively recent NPR piece entitled 'Why Certain Poor Shepherds In Nativity Scenes Have Huge, Misshapen Throats'.
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Old 05-17-2020, 04:58 PM
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Without looking, I feel that Cook's Illustrated usually calls for Kosher salt. In part I think it's because Kosher salt is less salty per volume than ordinary table salt so it's harder to oversalt. I know their brine recipes call for Kosher salt and if memory serves they call for more Diamond salt and less Morton's Kosher in the same volume of water because Diamond is less salty.
I call BS on this.
Salt is essentially 100% NaCl. It’s all the same amount of “salty.”
But, Iodized salt is slightly bitter tasting. Not enough for most people, but snobby chefs can taste the difference. So, they specify un-iodized. Kosher salt is also coarser, so that has an effect for some recipes.
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:05 PM
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Without looking, I feel that Cook's Illustrated usually calls for Kosher salt. In part I think it's because Kosher salt is less salty per volume than ordinary table salt so it's harder to oversalt. I know their brine recipes call for Kosher salt and if memory serves they call for more Diamond salt and less Morton's Kosher in the same volume of water because Diamond is less salty.
It looks like it's a mix depending on the type of recipe which makes sense. A search for "kosher salt" recipes on cooksillustrated.com, I get 857 results. "table salt" recipes show 3033, so yes, it looks like they use kosher when the recipe would benefit from it (looks like mostly meat dishes) and then fall back on table salt where it doesn't matter the consistency of the salt.

Last edited by vonespy; 05-17-2020 at 05:06 PM. Reason: added cooksillustrated.com
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:07 PM
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Yes, all salt is kosher, whether iodized or not. Kosher salt is a misnomer. It's called that because it's the type of salt traditionally used for drying kosher meats.
And don't get me started on "kosher" pickles!
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{...} I know their brine recipes call for Kosher salt and if memory serves they call for more Diamond salt and less Morton's Kosher in the same volume of water because Diamond is less salty.
No! It's because Diamond and Morton don't have the same shape. You don't get the same mass per volume.

CMC fnord!
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:18 PM
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Morton Kosher salt: 1.5 g weight per 1/4 tsp
Kroger Iodized table salt: 1.2 g weight per 1/4 tsp.

Last edited by needscoffee; 05-17-2020 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:30 PM
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Yes, yes, I understand that one molecule of NaCl=one molecule of NaCl. I think my post was pretty clear that it's about the volume of different kinds of salt, but go ahead, dunk away.
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:35 PM
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Yes, yes, I understand that one molecule of NaCl=one molecule of NaCl. I think my post was pretty clear that it's about the volume of different kinds of salt, but go ahead, dunk away.
What does "dunk away" mean in this context?
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Old 05-17-2020, 06:46 PM
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It's current slang. From the Free Dictionary site - dunk on (someone) slang To best someone in a spectacular fashion and/or in a way that is humiliating to them. In basketball, to "dunk on" a defender is to perform a slam dunk over them, a move often considered humiliating to the defender. The phrase is commonly used in a passive construction ("(one) got dunked on").
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Old 05-17-2020, 06:59 PM
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Non iodized salt is preferred for pickling and canning. Iodized salt can cause weird colors and has anti caking additives. My household has done several batches of pickling since shelter in place orders. Eggs, onions, jalapeños, cuke’s, garlic.
Do you mean you use pickling salt? In addition to no additives, pickling salt is ground finer so it dissolves more easily. It's my understanding that noniodized table salt may still contain anti-clumping agents.
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Old 05-17-2020, 07:00 PM
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Iodized salt has some dextrose as a vehicle and stabilizer for the iodine. The dextrose is not kosher for Passover. Iodine is not a problem but the carrier is.
OK, but kosher for passover is much more restrictive than kosher generally.
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Old 05-17-2020, 07:09 PM
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Morton Kosher salt: 1.5 g weight per 1/4 tsp
Kroger Iodized table salt: 1.2 g weight per 1/4 tsp.
Oops! That's backwards.

Morton Kosher Salt: 1.2g weight per 2/4 tsp
Kroger Iodized Salt: 1.5g weight per 1/4 tsp

Sorry!

Oddly, the Kosher salt contains Yellow Prussiate of Soda (anti-caking agent)
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Old 05-17-2020, 07:42 PM
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Oddly, the Kosher salt contains Yellow Prussiate of Soda (anti-caking agent)
I'm pretty sure, but not positive, that if you're looking for salt with no additives, your best bet is pickling salt. (But you shouldn't necessarily use it as a 1:1 ratio by volume, since it's usually ground to a finer consistency.)
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:10 PM
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I was running low on table salt so got a box recently, so I currently have two different brands as well as an old cylindrical container that I use as a salt shaker and refill occasionally. All three of them say "iodized" so the stuff definitely exists. My closest grocery store was recently out of ordinary table salt (lots of sea salt and other exotic stuff) but another store had plenty, so yes, non-iodized salt was probably just a temporary stocking issue.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:37 PM
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Off the top of my head, I have 3 types of salt plus at least 8 flavored or amended salts (e.g., alder-smoked salt, Szechuan pepper & salt, black salt, etc.). Different salts for different uses, including Morton's iodized.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley Dweller View Post
I only buy non-GMO water.
  #50  
Old 05-17-2020, 09:16 PM
purplehorseshoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
I call BS on this.

Salt is essentially 100% NaCl. It’s all the same amount of “salty.”

But, Iodized salt is slightly bitter tasting. Not enough for most people, but snobby chefs can taste the difference. So, they specify un-iodized. Kosher salt is also coarser, so that has an effect for some recipes.
My late Other Shoe said he could taste the iodine, to the point where he essentially banned the stuff from our kitchen except for salting pasta water. But, he liked salt - when he died, we had around ten kinds of salt in the pantry. Smoked, pickling, Himalayan, etc. My mother was horrified. ("Who cares? It's all just salty." They were, ah, very different people.)

Kosher salt is used for koshering - drawing the blood out of meat per Biblical rules. This is also useful for us atheists and Gentiles for drying the surface of, say, a chunk of steak before you sear it. Moisture inhibits the Maillard reaction, when proteins brown - the source of much yumminess. Dry meat sears better, so if you let a healthy dose of kosher salt sit on the surface of the meat for a while, it helps draw away the moisture. Thus, better searing.
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