Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-18-2006, 03:47 PM
Meeko Meeko is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 7,989
Postal Carrier wants me to move my car. I say I dont have to....

I'm home for the hollidays since last Wednesday. I am at home with the family, and I parked my Explorer on the street/Cul-de-sac next to our yard. As straight as one can get a non-curved car, on a non-curved stretch of road.

Mail did not come for two days in a row. Third day, we recieved an enormous amount of mail (Obviously, the three days worth).

Fast-forward to today's delivery.

Postal carrier knocked on the door and handed me the mail, and stated that I had to move my car. If I did not move my car, he would not deliver the mail, and that today was a warning.

We argued, and he didn't grasp the fact that a car/truck is way less cumbersome than 8 ft snowfall. He said that I was not only doing a diservice to me, but also my neighbor, since he couldn't get to them either.

I then said "Oh, I guess your car doesnt have a reverse on it?" and slammed the door in his face.


Do I need to move my own car, which is front of 'my' house? ((I do receive mail to this address))

Where does he get off, telling me to move my car, and what would he do if it snowed?

Back when the US mail was owned by the Govt. Wasnt it an honnor for the carriers to 'never fail' in the delivery?
  #2  
Old 12-18-2006, 03:50 PM
silenus's Avatar
silenus silenus is offline
Isaiah 1:15 Screw the NRA.
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 49,967
If your car is blocking the mailboxes in any way, the carrier is in the right. Otherwise, I'm not so sure. But they will refuse to deliver if you are in any way impeding their access to the mailbox.
  #3  
Old 12-18-2006, 03:53 PM
Meeko Meeko is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 7,989
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
If your car is blocking the mailboxes in any way, the carrier is in the right. Otherwise, I'm not so sure. But they will refuse to deliver if you are in any way impeding their access to the mailbox.
I was not in front of the box itself. Could he get the jeep type car in front of the box? That is up to debate.

Can he not walk? Don't postal carriers walk on mor crowded routes?

Where is this posted?
Did I miss that day in class?
  #4  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:02 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 17,180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
Where is this posted?
Uh - here?

3.1.4 Clear Approach
Customers must keep the approach to their mailboxes clear of obstructions to allow safe access for delivery. If USPS employees are impeded in reaching a mail receptacle, the postmaster may withdraw delivery service.

3.2.6 Location
Subject to state laws and regulations, a curbside mailbox must be placed to allow safe and convenient delivery by carriers without leaving their vehicles. The box must be on the right-hand side of the road in the direction of travel of the carriers on any new rural route or highway contract route, in all cases where traffic conditions are dangerous for the carriers to drive to the left to reach the box, or where their doing so would violate traffic laws and regulations.


That took about a minute to find. I'm sure you could find more, and your carrier (as well as you) may have copped an attitude, but if you want your mail delivered you might want to park elsewhere.
  #5  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:13 PM
Lamar Mundane Lamar Mundane is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 8,932
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko

I then said "Oh, I guess your car doesnt have a reverse on it?" and slammed the door in his face.

That's the Christmas spirit!
  #6  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:18 PM
the PC apeman the PC apeman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Unban Otto
Posts: 1,045
Most every one in my neighborhood has a mailbox attached to the house near their front door. The mail carrier parks and walks to a half-dozen or so houses, moves the van, repeat. (He probably does more houses at a time in the flatter areas.)

Maybe you could change to a house-mounted type mailbox or a mail-slot in your front door. I'm sure your carrier would love that.

(While my home's foundation was dug out for repairs, I set up a typical streetsedge box on a post. When construction was complete, I felt kind of bad moving the mailbox back to the front door. It's up about 8 steps.)
  #7  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:20 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 17,180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
Back when the US mail was owned by the Govt. Wasnt it an honnor for the carriers to 'never fail' in the delivery?
Yeah, back in the day my mail cariers really enjoyed it when I would install ever-increasing challenges for them to over come in order to get my mail to me. Attack dogs, snake pits, moats ... those dedicated civil servants cheerily overcame any obstacle - or gladly died trying. Where need one look these days to find a little basic work ethic and pride in a job well done?
  #8  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:25 PM
hajario's Avatar
hajario hajario is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Posts: 15,505
Quote:
Originally Posted by the PC apeman
Most every one in my neighborhood has a mailbox attached to the house near their front door. The mail carrier parks and walks to a half-dozen or so houses, moves the van, repeat. (He probably does more houses at a time in the flatter areas.)
You couldn't do that in my neighborhood. We are designated as the kind with street side boxes. Only older neighborhoods that are grandfathered in can have the doorway kinds.

Years ago I didn't know better and parked in front of my mail box. The postman put a flier on my car that had the appropriate regulations printed on it. You can also be denied delivery if you have too much snow or any other obstruction in front of your box.

You were being an ass when you slammed to door in the postman's face.
  #9  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:29 PM
jjimm jjimm is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 28,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
"Oh, I guess your car doesnt have a reverse on it?" and slammed the door in his face.
Whether you're in the right or the wrong, this approach is not only hideously rude, but also a surefire way to end up with your mail rubbed generously in the sweaty asscrack of whichever mail carrier is delivering it.
  #10  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:31 PM
Guinastasia's Avatar
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 51,816
Quote:
Back when the US mail was owned by the Govt.
Is this a whoosh? Last time I checked, the government is STILL in charge of the mail.
  #11  
Old 12-18-2006, 04:44 PM
Wee Bairn Wee Bairn is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Biafra
Posts: 5,734
I tried to fight this battle once, and lost. If they can't get their trucks to drive in front of the box with ease, they do not have to deliver your mail. You don't like it, you can pick up your mail at the post office. This is one of those battles not worth the effort, because you ain't gonna win.
  #12  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:23 PM
FatBaldGuy FatBaldGuy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: SLC, USA
Posts: 4,087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
Where does he get off, telling me to move my car, and what would he do if it snowed?
Just so you don't think we're ignoring this part of your childish rant, if it snowed and he couldn't get access to your mailbox, he would not deliver mail until you cleared a path.
  #13  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:30 PM
Meeko Meeko is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 7,989
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatBaldGuy
Just so you don't think we're ignoring this part of your childish rant, if it snowed and he couldn't get access to your mailbox, he would not deliver mail until you cleared a path.
Again, I thought it was an old motto / tradition / saying that weather[listed in various forms] will not keep the USPS from making its rounds.
  #14  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:32 PM
Q.E.D. Q.E.D. is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 22,536
Sure, the postal carrier is being a bit pissy about it. Unfortunately for you, he's also well within his rights. Even if he weren't, there are two broad groups of people you don't want to piss off: the people who handle your food where you can't see it, and the people who deliver things to your house. It's the price we pay for peace of mind. You need to apologize profusely to that man.
  #15  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:33 PM
Guinastasia's Avatar
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 51,816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
Again, I thought it was an old motto / tradition / saying that weather[listed in various forms] will not keep the USPS from making its rounds.
It's a saying, not actual policy. And while the weather itself might not prevent the mail from being delivered, (providing there isn't a state of emergency in severe weather), a mailbox that has been blocked WILL.
  #16  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:33 PM
Q.E.D. Q.E.D. is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 22,536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
Again, I thought it was an old motto / tradition / saying that weather[listed in various forms] will not keep the USPS from making its rounds.
Mottoes are not legally binding.
  #17  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:41 PM
According to Pliny According to Pliny is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Novum Comum, Gallia
Posts: 3,126
I used to work at the post office. Complain to either the Postmaster or Assistant Postmaster.
It's sometimes hard to get the number from the main website, but they are usually listed if you enter "Post Office" into the Yahoo Yellow Pages - http://yp.yahoo.com/

Usually they just want things to go smoothly, so they will tell the carrier to back off. If they don't, then it must really be a problem.
__________________
Semper aliquid novi Africa affert. There is always something new out of Africa. ~ Pliny the Elder-Natural History
  #18  
Old 12-18-2006, 05:43 PM
Sapo Sapo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Puerto Rico
Posts: 6,786
Mrs Sapo (the postal carrier) just had a good laugh at this. No clear access to your mailbox, no mail.

There are different types of routes, All walking, Park and Loop, All riding, Clusters only, etc. If you live in an area where you need to have a streetside mailbox, that's the last of it. A car blocking your box (even if it is not yours) means no delivery. After several days (the first they just assume it is happenstance) they will notify you that you must clear the box. If in that period you don't comply, they will put a hold in your address. That means they won't even attempt to deliver (i.e. they won't have your mail in the truck) until you go there and notify them that the box is clear.

It kinda sucks, but consider that he has to deal with an entire route full of people who think THEIR mail is super special and important. Making favours and exceptions only gets them in trouble.

Oh and yes, the car does have a reverse. They are only supposed to use in the designated spots on the route (and they do anything to avoid having reverse points in the route) and if a supervisor finds him reversing where he shouldn't he gets in trouble. If he has an accident while reversing, he is in a world of trouble.
  #19  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:08 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Suburbs of Chicagoland
Posts: 22,337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
Again, I thought it was an old motto / tradition / saying that weather[listed in various forms] will not keep the USPS from making its rounds.
Yeah, it's a nice motto, but it says "neither rain nor snow nor dark of night." It doesn't include things like "jerk customers setting up an obstacle course," nor does it supersede local snow removal laws if you're getting ideas about that, by the way. My husband faced a door-slot mailbox past a set of front stairs where not only were they not shoveled, but the resident's kids had turned it into a literal snow slope for sledding down. He rubber-banded the mail up and tossed it on the porch, being nice since he could have taken it back to the office. The next day, the resident told him that she thought he had to deliver it into the box regardless.

My husband says the policy at his particular office would probably be to "dismount" for the occasional obstruction but not deliver for repeated instances - doing that every day would slow down the carrier on the route, especially if they let everyone do it, and it could pose a risk to the carrier in some cases.

And reversing? In the street when not absolutely required? Hell no. You try to back up a brick-shaped vehicle with all of those odd mirrors and see how often you want to do it, especially when you're trying to not hit a customer's car or mailboxes. Where my husband works, he absolutely cannot back up his vehicle except for specially-designated situations/locations, or face suspension. (Apparently the risk for/incidence of accidents in these vehicles is too great.)
  #20  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:16 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Wisconsin USA
Posts: 16,843
The way you did it works get if you don't recieve bills to the house, and only do on-line billing. You can stop recieving the 90% unwanted garbage in your life. You can legally park there, but they will legally require you to pick up the mail from the post office, if you do. They don't always keep it either. Sometimes they send your mail back to the sender with a note of undelverable. The sent one important documant back to the sender once because one day the county highway crew blocked access for a couple hours. The mail got delevered after that day like normal, except for the important one that got sent back as undeliverable to the sender. We found out because the sender told us over the phone.
  #21  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:17 PM
Mangetout's Avatar
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: England
Posts: 57,720
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjimm
Whether you're in the right or the wrong, this approach is not only hideously rude, but also a surefire way to end up with your mail rubbed generously in the sweaty asscrack of whichever mail carrier is delivering it.
Or worse - after all, this is a postal worker we're talking about - slamming the door in his face might be equivalent to saying "Oooh! Oooh! When you go on a killing spree, Shoot ME, Shoot ME first!"
  #22  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:21 PM
brad_d brad_d is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Long Beach, California
Posts: 1,875
Suppose my neighbor decides that the best place for him to park his '86 Buick is directly in front of my mailbox, resulting in my mail delivery eventually being put on hold. Further suppose he tells me to get stuffed when I ask him to park elsewhere: "It's a public street, Buddy. I'll park where I want."

What are my options at this point? Is he breaking any laws?
  #23  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:24 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,905
IIRC that motto (neither snow, nor rude owners of SUV's parking in the way, nor dark of night...) is not of the USPS, but a courier service that build a building and had their motto set in stone, then the USPS bought the building and never removed the motto. IIRC it is the USPS on 8th ave and 33rd st in NYC.

But besides that, why would you purposely make someone's job difficult? Can't you just park in some place that won't cause problems?
  #24  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:26 PM
Guinastasia's Avatar
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 51,816
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad_d
Suppose my neighbor decides that the best place for him to park his '86 Buick is directly in front of my mailbox, resulting in my mail delivery eventually being put on hold. Further suppose he tells me to get stuffed when I ask him to park elsewhere: "It's a public street, Buddy. I'll park where I want."

What are my options at this point? Is he breaking any laws?
Simple-you call the cops, and they'll send a tow-truck, I would imagine.
  #25  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:29 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Suburbs of Chicagoland
Posts: 22,337
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad_d
Suppose my neighbor decides that the best place for him to park his '86 Buick is directly in front of my mailbox, resulting in my mail delivery eventually being put on hold. Further suppose he tells me to get stuffed when I ask him to park elsewhere: "It's a public street, Buddy. I'll park where I want."

What are my options at this point? Is he breaking any laws?
My letter carrier husband says to call the post office and either talk to your carrier or a delivery supervisor, explaining the situation. Either they'll make an exception for you, or maybe try to deal with your neighbor too.
  #26  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:48 PM
the PC apeman the PC apeman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Unban Otto
Posts: 1,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferret Herder
...
And reversing? In the street when not absolutely required? Hell no. You try to back up a brick-shaped vehicle with all of those odd mirrors and see how often you want to do it, especially when you're trying to not hit a customer's car or mailboxes. Where my husband works, he absolutely cannot back up his vehicle except for specially-designated situations/locations, or face suspension. (Apparently the risk for/incidence of accidents in these vehicles is too great.)
Are mail delivery routes this micromanaged? We had a substitute carrier one week - a young (20-ish) guy with a serious attitude problem. Unfortunately for him, I had a concrete delivery one day during his stint and it was blocking the width of the street.

He griped and stomped his feet and demanded that I move the mixer. Well, it wasn't my mixer to move. Maybe I could have asked the contractor (who ordered the cement) to ask the driver but none of us thought that should be necessary.

So for the next 15-20 minutes the carrier sat in his van pouting and listening to his iPod. Did he do the cul-de-sac behind him that he normally delivers after my street? No. Did he go around the block and access the street from the other direction. No? He just sat there, pouted, and waited.

Could it really have been that he had no discretion in the matter?
  #27  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:49 PM
Enola Straight Enola Straight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Somers Point, NJ
Posts: 5,914
[postalworker/]"Say ...that's a nice car...it sure would be a shame is something were to happen to it"[postal worker]

That, and are you sure he dosen't collect AK-47s?


Do yourself a favor, and don't aggravate a stranger with an already stressful job.
  #28  
Old 12-18-2006, 08:56 PM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 12,684
Of course you don't have to move your car. You will move it, though, when you drive to the post office to pick up your mail which the postman won't deliver.
  #29  
Old 12-18-2006, 09:12 PM
Sapo Sapo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Puerto Rico
Posts: 6,786
Quote:
Originally Posted by the PC apeman
Are mail delivery routes this micromanaged? We had a substitute carrier one week - a young (20-ish) guy with a serious attitude problem. Unfortunately for him, I had a concrete delivery one day during his stint and it was blocking the width of the street.

He griped and stomped his feet and demanded that I move the mixer. Well, it wasn't my mixer to move. Maybe I could have asked the contractor (who ordered the cement) to ask the driver but none of us thought that should be necessary.

So for the next 15-20 minutes the carrier sat in his van pouting and listening to his iPod. Did he do the cul-de-sac behind him that he normally delivers after my street? No. Did he go around the block and access the street from the other direction. No? He just sat there, pouted, and waited.

Could it really have been that he had no discretion in the matter?
Yes they are that micromanaged. And no he didn't have much discretion in the matter. There is a lot of answering to do if you are found out of your route.

The problem with your new carrier was probably aggravated by the fact that didn't KNOW how to navigate around that obstacle. It would have messed up his sequence and he wouldn't have known how to pick up his trail again (think ants in "A Bug's Life"). Your regular carrier might have been able to deal with it better.
  #30  
Old 12-18-2006, 09:17 PM
GiantRat GiantRat is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,123
While in college, I worked for USPS as a Casual Carrier (that is, an un-uniformed temporary carrier). From what I remember, USPS was largely (if not entirely) self-sufficient financially, but is still a Federal agency, FWIW. More importantly, USPS policies regarding driving routes (and driving to park-and-loop route stops) were largely written with an eye toward safety. Having driven an LLV (the aluminum cheesebox on wheels that's become ubiquitous), I can say that reverse should only be used when absolutely vital (i.e., parking the thing in the Post Office's loading bay. There's no rearview mirror (since there's no rear window), and reversing using just the side mirrors leaves a big blind spot right where you least want it - your direction of travel while reversing. You having to park somewhere else is a small price to pay to avoid having a kid chasing a ball into the street getting killed by a Postal worker who can't see him.
  #31  
Old 12-18-2006, 09:21 PM
scr4 scr4 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 14,792
So what you guys are saying is, if there is a car near the mailbox, so the carrier cannot reach the mailbox without stepping out of the van and walking 10 feet, he would choose not to deliver to that mailbox?
  #32  
Old 12-18-2006, 09:23 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 30,010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Q.E.D.
You need to apologize profusely to that man.
Or tender a polite apology accompanied by some fine baked goods.

I doubt your family is really happy about losing mail service merely for your parking convenience.

I and at least half the people on my block got curt notices awhile back to mount our curbside mailboxes 18 inches higher within 72 hours, or have mail delivery suspended. Aapparently the new Mail Delivery Czar drove a taller vehicle and found it inconvenient to reach down into the boxes which had served just fine for years. Enough people squawked so that the deadline was graciously extended to 10 days, but we all dutifully went out and got new posts.

You don't mess with the Postal Service.

For the old-fashioned "neither rain nor snow..." delivery types, take the bozos who drop off the free Weekly Suburban Pissant newspaper and ad fliers. Nothing will stop them from completing their appointed rounds...on your driveway, in your flower beds...
  #33  
Old 12-18-2006, 09:58 PM
ParentalAdvisory ParentalAdvisory is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: The Chicago Area
Posts: 5,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4
So what you guys are saying is, if there is a car near the mailbox, so the carrier cannot reach the mailbox without stepping out of the van and walking 10 feet, he would choose not to deliver to that mailbox?
I think that's it. While it was rude how you acted toward the carrier, I feel that if a car is obstructing the mail box, it is not a lot to ask to step out of the carrier vehicle and put the mail in the frickin' mailbox. These vehicles are not space capsules, you can get out of them after you launch from the post office.
  #34  
Old 12-18-2006, 10:01 PM
ParentalAdvisory ParentalAdvisory is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: The Chicago Area
Posts: 5,956
*You as in the OP, not you scr4.
  #35  
Old 12-18-2006, 10:11 PM
Neptunian Slug Neptunian Slug is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by the PC apeman
Most every one in my neighborhood has a mailbox attached to the house near their front door. The mail carrier parks and walks to a half-dozen or so houses, moves the van, repeat. (He probably does more houses at a time in the flatter areas.)

Maybe you could change to a house-mounted type mailbox or a mail-slot in your front door. I'm sure your carrier would love that.

(While my home's foundation was dug out for repairs, I set up a typical streetsedge box on a post. When construction was complete, I felt kind of bad moving the mailbox back to the front door. It's up about 8 steps.)
You're lucky. Apparently, the USPS is forcefeeding my neighborhood with curbside boxes. I had to get one since I was new to the neighborhood. So now about five houses out of 100 or so have a curbside mailbox. That will really improve effienciency. I am sure they will force everyone to convert soner or later.
  #36  
Old 12-18-2006, 10:16 PM
Mr. Slant Mr.  Slant is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 5,484
If they get really evil they'll put one of those conglomerated mailbox deals at the end of the street. Now THOSE are the devil.
  #37  
Old 12-18-2006, 10:32 PM
hajario's Avatar
hajario hajario is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Posts: 15,505
Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4
So what you guys are saying is, if there is a car near the mailbox, so the carrier cannot reach the mailbox without stepping out of the van and walking 10 feet, he would choose not to deliver to that mailbox?
Multiply that by three hundred houses and you might understand why.
  #38  
Old 12-18-2006, 10:57 PM
susan's Avatar
susan susan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Coastal USA
Posts: 8,982
I don't mind the conglomerate boxes since they added locked package boxes as well. I've never had my mail ripped off or unwanted non-USPS mail put in the box when I've had one of those, rarely wind up with missing mail or someone else's mail, and still have a personal relationship with my mail carrier.
  #39  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:02 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Suburbs of Chicagoland
Posts: 22,337
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajario
Multiply that by three hundred houses and you might understand why.
Exactly. That's why I noted above that a rare occasion is probably fine, but repeated instances are another matter entirely. The whole point of a driving route is to be able to drive up to each box, lean out, and put the mail in. Cars behind the postal vehicle will expect slow driving with a series of very brief stops. When it turns into "drive forward, secure parking brake, unbuckle seat belt, hop out of vehicle, close door, walk to box, put mail in, open door, hop in, buckle up, take parking brake off, continue forward" then suddenly the drivers behind you don't know what to expect from your vehicle, and your time for each stop where this happens has probably tripled, messing up your delivery time, and probably pissing off your supervisors because if enough people do it you're suddenly getting overtime on this route that has been planned out for you to fit in under that time. So it's not just the letter carrier's convenience at stake, but safety issues, USPS budgets, etc.
  #40  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:11 AM
Athena Athena is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: da UP, eh
Posts: 13,227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko
what would he do if it snowed?
I can tell you from experience, if it snowed to the point where he couldn't pull his car up to the mailbox, he wouldn't deliver the mail. As many others have said, it's the recipient's responsibility to provide a clear path to the mailbox; that includes snow removal.

We happen to pay for snow removal service. Our plow guy does our drive and then cuts a swath by the mailboxes. Even with that, we sometimes get a notice in our mailbox saying that we need to do it better.
  #41  
Old 12-19-2006, 07:07 AM
MsWhatsit MsWhatsit is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 12,267
I would further point out that some carriers who have mounted routes (i.e., driving routes) have physical conditions that prevent them from doing a walking route and so no, they really can't park the truck and walk 10 feet (especially not multiple times over the course of an entire route) when your mailbox is blocked.

In addition to the other excellent reasons listed earlier by Ferret Herder and others, that is.
  #42  
Old 12-19-2006, 08:26 AM
the PC apeman the PC apeman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Unban Otto
Posts: 1,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptunian Slug
You're lucky. Apparently, the USPS is forcefeeding my neighborhood with curbside boxes. I had to get one since I was new to the neighborhood. So now about five houses out of 100 or so have a curbside mailbox. That will really improve effienciency. I am sure they will force everyone to convert soner or later.
Yes, I see how lucky we are in this neighborhood. I suspect part of the reason are our narrow two-lane streets with one lane of parked cars. Half of us would have to have our mailboxes across the street in someone else's yard*.


* I know it's actually city property to about 10' out from the street but that's not the way people think of "their property" around here.
  #43  
Old 12-19-2006, 08:40 AM
scr4 scr4 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 14,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsWhatsit
... some carriers who have mounted routes (i.e., driving routes) have physical conditions that prevent them from doing a walking route and so no, they really can't park the truck and walk 10 feet ...
What do they do about packages?
  #44  
Old 12-19-2006, 08:44 AM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 12,684
Quote:
Originally Posted by the PC apeman
* I know it's actually city property to about 10' out from the street but that's not the way people think of "their property" around here.
In most cases isn't it an easement in case the city needs some extra room when doing street repairs? If that's the case, you don't have an easement to put your mailbox on their property.
  #45  
Old 12-19-2006, 08:46 AM
Sapo Sapo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Puerto Rico
Posts: 6,786
There are normally some trucks with just packages. This prevents regular routes to be too messed up in their timing by dealing with packages. If it is one or two, then fine, if there are too many or if the carrier is uncapable of delivering them (because they are light duty only) then the package truck delivers them.
  #46  
Old 12-19-2006, 08:56 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Wisconsin USA
Posts: 16,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by the PC apeman
Yes, I see how lucky we are in this neighborhood. I suspect part of the reason are our narrow two-lane streets with one lane of parked cars. Half of us would have to have our mailboxes across the street in someone else's yard*.


* I know it's actually city property to about 10' out from the street but that's not the way people think of "their property" around here.
The mial boxes around here were all on one side of the street for decades. They delivered in one direction and did a loop. They switched the businesses to a different carrier now, so thy have the boxes on the other side of the road now, and some residents still have to cross the street.
  #47  
Old 12-19-2006, 09:21 AM
the PC apeman the PC apeman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Unban Otto
Posts: 1,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Simmons
In most cases isn't it an easement in case the city needs some extra room when doing street repairs? If that's the case, you don't have an easement to put your mailbox on their property.
Well, looking at a surveyor's map of my neighborhood, the properly lines are clearly 10' from the curb. This was an issue here for some folks doing remodeling. The building code set backs are measured from the property line, not the curb.
  #48  
Old 12-19-2006, 09:40 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajario
Multiply that by three hundred houses and you might understand why.
Not to mention that every time he has to do that, my mail further down the line gets more and more delayed. I don't think that's fair at all and I prefer the rules that says everyone has to have their mailbox cleared.

Mailmen have their routes planned out just right so they can get to everyone in the same day. If they have it planned so it's "drive-stop-put mail in/repeat" and then suddenly they have to get out for even 10 houses, it's going to put the whole route behind. And I don't think the rest of the route should have to put up with that so 10 people can park where they wish!
  #49  
Old 12-19-2006, 09:52 AM
Queuing Queuing is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: soon to be Kingston, ON
Posts: 1,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enola Straight
Do yourself a favor, and don't aggravate a stranger with an already stressful job.
I have never understood why postal work is considered so stressful. To be honest it seems like a pretty easy job to me, can anyone explain?
  #50  
Old 12-19-2006, 10:00 AM
Mr. Slant Mr.  Slant is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 5,484
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sapo
There are normally some trucks with just packages. This prevents regular routes to be too messed up in their timing by dealing with packages. If it is one or two, then fine, if there are too many or if the carrier is uncapable of delivering them (because they are light duty only) then the package truck delivers them.
This raises a question I've had.
I've started selling used books online.
I know that my carrier is glad to pick up a box or two with pre-printed media mail labels on it from my residential mailbox.
How many individually boxed books would I have to leave out before my carrier got annoyed with me?
Is that just something they cope with as part of their business operations plan?
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:03 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017