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Old 07-16-2007, 10:45 AM
Evil Captor is offline
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Where do human sex pheromones originate?


Do they issue from the skin generally, like sweat? Are they concentrated in certain body areas known for odor, like the armpits and crotch? Are there specific glands that produce them, specific sites that emit them? How much is known about this topic? I figure it can't be completely solved, or there would be products that actually deliver what some women's perfume and men's cologne ads promise.

Enquiring minds want to know.
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evil Captor
Do they issue from the skin generally, like sweat? Are they concentrated in certain body areas known for odor, like the armpits and crotch? Are there specific glands that produce them, specific sites that emit them? How much is known about this topic? I figure it can't be completely solved, or there would be products that actually deliver what some women's perfume and men's cologne ads promise.

Enquiring minds want to know.
bumping and grinding ...
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Old 07-17-2007, 03:30 PM
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Do human sex pheromones actually exist? I've seen speculation on this but no real research. The speculation was along the lines of; "Well, other animals have them. Why not us?" The only thing I've seen making an actual claim that human sex pheromones exist and have an effect was an ad in the back of a magazine trying to sell some sort of magic fluid to put in my aftershave. Not the best kind of cite.

Testy
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Old 07-17-2007, 04:06 PM
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Hard to say. We really don't know much about human pheromones. Most of the work I've seen published on human pheromones always refers to them as "putative human pheromones". The usual candidate proposed is androstadienone, and the usual means of secretion is armpit sweat ("axillary secretions"). This would be the fatty, pungent sweat produced by the apocrine sweat glands in the armpit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10.1002/ar.a.20125
Among primates in general, pheromones are of variable importance to social communication. Data on humans have generated the greatest controversy regarding the existence of pheromonal communication. In this review, the likelihood of pheromonal communication in humans is assessed with a discussion of chemical compounds produced by the axilla that may function as pheromones; the likelihood that the vomeronasal organ (VNO), a putative pheromone receptor organ in many other mammals, is functional in humans; and the possible ways pheromones operate in humans. In the human axilla, the interactions between the cutaneous microflora and axillary secretions render this region analogous to scent glands found in other primates. Both the chemistry of axillary secretions and their effects on conspecifics in humans appear to be analogous to other mammalian pheromone systems. Whichever chemical compounds serve a pheromonal function in humans, another unknown is the receptor. Although the VNO has been implicated in the reception of pheromones in many vertebrates, it is not the only pathway through which such information has access to the central nervous system; there is ample evidence to support the view that the olfactory epithelium can respond to pheromones. Furthermore, if a chemical activates receptors within the VNO, this does not necessarily mean that the compound is a pheromone. An important caveat for humans is that critical components typically found within the functioning VNO of other, nonprimate, mammals are lacking, suggesting that the human VNO does not function in the way that has been described for other mammals. In a broader perspective, pheromones can be classified as primers, signalers, modulators, and releasers. There is good evidence to support the presence of the former three in humans. Examples include affects on the menstrual cycle (primer effects); olfactory recognition of newborn by its mother (signaler); individuals may exude different odors based on mood (suggestive of modulator effects). However, there is no good evidence for releaser effects in adult humans. It is emphasized that no bioassay-guided study has led to the isolation of true human pheromones, a step that will elucidate specific functions to human chemical signals.
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Old 07-17-2007, 04:18 PM
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Crescend

So, some evidence that some chemicals may modulate, prime or signal in humans. But no firm evidence that sex pheromones actually exist or have an effect. I guess I'll save my noney and not buy that stuff out of the magazine.

Thanks

Testy
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Old 07-17-2007, 05:07 PM
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There are no known human pheromones, so if we have them, we don't know where they originate.
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