View Poll Results: Is Chiropractic woo?
Yes, entirely woo 75 34.25%
Somewhat woo, somewhat true 121 55.25%
All true, no woo 9 4.11%
Obligatory "Some other option" explained in a post 14 6.39%
Voters: 219. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 12-09-2012, 02:05 AM
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Is Chiropractic pure woo?


Simple question really, but I am woefully ignorant on Chiropractic and the chiropractors who administer treatments.

Are they on the same level as psychics, homeopathy, Mayan end-of-the-world predictions and so on?

Perhaps the practice is just mostly or somewhat woo... kind of like acupuncture (IE, legitimate research has been mixed, some insurance companies accept it as a valid medical treatment)?

Or is it really legitimate, to be as respected as dentistry and medicine?

Last edited by drewtwo99; 12-09-2012 at 02:07 AM.
  #2  
Old 12-09-2012, 02:18 AM
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The fundamental teachings of chiropractic, as developed by DD Palmer, are woo. It's basically vitalism - that there's some life energy that Palmer called innate intelligence that is the natural healing force in the body, and that it gets disrupted by misalignments of the spine. The idea is that once this life energy is restored to balance, it can fix all sorts of health ailments, including things that have nothing to do with your spine at all, like asthma. It is entirely woo.

However, it would appear that over the years playing around with the body, chiropractors may have learned some actual stuff about the human body, and some of their techniques can indeed provide some relief from back pain and such, but it has nothing to do with subluxations and blocking the magical healing life force, but simply manipulating a problem body part.

Chiropractors range from "straight" chiropractors follow the psuedoscientific vitalism nonsense very closely. More scientifically minded chiropractors actually essentially try to act like doctors or physical therapists that specialize in the back.

Are the latter legitimate medical practitioners? I don't really know. I wouldn't want to go to one. But it's clear that the first group isn't.

I'd imagine you could give a basic test to a chiropractor to ask if they believe in innate intelligence - if so, they're a kook. If not... well, I still would rather just see doctors, but maybe they're not kooks.
  #3  
Old 12-09-2012, 02:22 AM
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Read for yourself.

For instance, their specialty is lower back pain, and there the results are inconclusive:
Quote:
Abstract... results of a systematic review of peer-reviewed publications between 2000 and 2010 ... six studies ... a high degree of inconsistency ...Three studies reported reduced use of other/extra treatments as a positive outcome; two studies reported a positive effect of chiropractic intervention on pain, and two studies reported a positive effect on disability. The six studies reviewed concentrated on the impact of chiropractic care on physical health and disability, rather than the wider holistic view which was the focus of this study. It is difficult, therefore, to defend any conclusion about the impact of chiropractic intervention on the quality of life, lifestyle, health and economic impact on chiropractic patients presenting with back pain.
  #4  
Old 12-09-2012, 05:10 AM
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Some other option, namely: How the heck should I know?
  #5  
Old 12-09-2012, 05:44 AM
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I went to a chiropractor for a few years. I never could make up my mind whether it really helped or had no effect whatsoever. And there were times when I think it made the symptoms worse. I probably wouldn't go to one again.
  #6  
Old 12-09-2012, 06:02 AM
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I voted "some other option" I think there are some who are valid chiropractic practitioners and there are far more who are selling a bunch of woo crap.

My personal experiences:

A horse, deemed dangerous and in physical pain. When he came to me he'd been "diagnosed" by several prominent vets, including specialists at Cornell University. The best they could come up with was atypical kissing spine. I had him treated by a certified Chiro (means they have to be either a DVM or a 4yr certified farrier prior to certification as a Chiro for animals)... at the time of his treatment, his spine problem had existed for approx 2 years and had affected his movement enough to effect the way his hooves grew out (because of the way he transferred his weight). After the first treatment, he showed immediate relief in the sense that he no longer reared or acted agitated when he thought he was going to be tacked up. This change was within 24 hours of the treatment and there was no other training to account for the fact that he'd quit rearing. Two treatments later, he was under tack as a dressage horse and scoring fairly well for his training level and showing no signs of pain.

My personal experience: I was taking dressage lessons and the instructor continually told me that my head was tilted to the left. Three months, she 'nagged' me to sit up 'straight' and try as I might, I could not detect that my head was tilted left (except for the weight shift was affecting the horse). I ended up taking a 'free chiro' treatment that was offered as an business introduction. It caused me all sorts of body tingling over the next two days and that was all that I personally noticed until my next lesson. My instructor was nearly leaping for joy when I was finally sitting up straight (and the horse finally got a break from me hanging over its left shoulder). (I had been T-Boned in an accident about 10 years prior and my head tilt was likely started by muscle guarding after the accident).

So, I do think they physical aspect of Chiropractic has some merit to it. Especially since the horse who benefited could not have had any form or placebo effect (since he had no idea that the guy poking him was a magic Chiropractor) and the horses change in weighting his feet was reflected in the way his hooves grew out.

I don't think anything of any 'body energy' woo and would avoid anyone who pushes those things (along with the blood tests, eye tests, ect).
  #7  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:23 AM
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Originally all woo. Now only mostly woo. If you throw enough shit against a wall, eventually some of it will stick.
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  #8  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:28 AM
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My mother goes to the chiropractor every week. She swears she feels relief. That's good enough for me. I have been to his office (waiting for her) and seen the woo he pushes. She does not partake of any of his other "services". She acknowledges that they are crap. But she gets in so much pain in her back, that even if his manipulations are purely placebo effect, that's fine. Relief is relief. And her insurance covers most of it, so win/win.
  #9  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:31 AM
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Originally all woo. Now only mostly woo.
Well said. This should have been an option.
  #10  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:32 AM
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I tend to think that any non-woo benefit that one could get from a chiropractor, one could also get from a physical therapist.
  #11  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:40 AM
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I tend to think that any non-woo benefit that one could get from a chiropractor, one could also get from a physical therapist.
Yes, and a physical therapist will treat you for a specified period of time and often give you home exercises or advice about how to move/work/exercise so that the pain does not return. A chiropractor generally wants to see you regularly forever.
  #12  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by SenorBeef View Post
The fundamental teachings of chiropractic, as developed by DD Palmer, are woo. It's basically vitalism - that there's some life energy that Palmer called innate intelligence that is the natural healing force in the body, and that it gets disrupted by misalignments of the spine. The idea is that once this life energy is restored to balance, it can fix all sorts of health ailments, including things that have nothing to do with your spine at all, like asthma. It is entirely woo.

However, it would appear that over the years playing around with the body, chiropractors may have learned some actual stuff about the human body, and some of their techniques can indeed provide some relief from back pain and such, but it has nothing to do with subluxations and blocking the magical healing life force, but simply manipulating a problem body part.

Chiropractors range from "straight" chiropractors follow the psuedoscientific vitalism nonsense very closely. More scientifically minded chiropractors actually essentially try to act like doctors or physical therapists that specialize in the back.

Are the latter legitimate medical practitioners? I don't really know. I wouldn't want to go to one. But it's clear that the first group isn't.

I'd imagine you could give a basic test to a chiropractor to ask if they believe in innate intelligence - if so, they're a kook. If not... well, I still would rather just see doctors, but maybe they're not kooks.
Pretty much what he said.

If a chiropractor claims to be able to cure diabetes or asthma or something like that with chiropracty, then I would say that that particular person is either mistaken or is deliberately going after the woo crowd. However, the ones who stick to trying to alleviate back pain apparently have some success, though of course there's always the placebo effect. I think that the success rate of these chiropractors is greater than the placebo effect can account for.

I go to a masseuse, and he can relieve pain in my back for a while, and also loosen up joints, as well as help move fluid in order to help with my congestive heart failure/lymphedema. So IME manipulation of the body can at least help you feel better for a time.
  #13  
Old 12-09-2012, 08:56 AM
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I tend to think that any non-woo benefit that one could get from a chiropractor, one could also get from a physical therapist.
This.

The non-woo benefit is small, temporary, and makes little to no difference to health in the long run.

QtM, who once shared an office with a chiropractor who rejected the principles of chiropractic and focused on delivering therapy for complaints of the back, shoulders, and hips.
  #14  
Old 12-09-2012, 09:01 AM
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I saw a chiropractor semi-regularly for years, twice a week at my worst and eventually at my own discretion. He was very good. I asked him about things like curing allergies or helping people to stop smoking, and he told me that was all nonsense, that chiropractic treatments were all about bio-mechanics. Good on him. If he'd said anything else I would have called him a fraud and walked out. Eventually he told me that there was no more he could do, the remaining problems were soft-tissue related and recommended I see a physiotherapist of his recommendation (in the U of C's kiniseology and sports medicine clinic, so I expect high standards applied), who ended up telling me a lot of the same things my chiropractor did.

Maybe I could have skipped the chiropractic treatments and gone right to physio, I don't know, but I never got the impression my chiropractor was a charlatan. And more than once I walked into his office bent over double and walked out sore, but upright. His office was full of anatomy textbooks and models of joints and spines, there was never any mention of energy points or chi or anything like that.

And I really hate the term "woo". It's infantile. "New-age garbage" is much more appropriate. And I know that some chiropractors do peddle new age garbage, but mine wasn't one of them.
  #15  
Old 12-09-2012, 09:24 AM
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In the UK, they're available on the NHS for back treatment- I wouldn't have paid to see one, but I was referred to one free by my doctor. All his claims did refer to actual body parts and mechanisms rather than 'energy' or obvious bullshit, and the actual manipulations certainly helped relax my muscles, which had been a cause of a lot of pain, but it later became very obvious that his 'diagnosis' of the problem was a complete pile of poo. Whether it even made medical sense, I'm not sure, and I can't remember enough detail to check.

He did, however, correctly realise there was something else going on when it no longer appeared to be simple back pain, at which point he abruptly stopped treatment and said I needed to be referred to a specialist, and probably needed an MRI because he could damage something as his initial diagnosis was obviously wrong.
  #16  
Old 12-09-2012, 09:32 AM
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Are we all four years old? Can we use grown-up words please? We have a perfectly fine term in "pseudoscience" and do not need to revert to baby talk like "woo."

Thanks for understanding.
  #17  
Old 12-09-2012, 09:52 AM
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I voted "somewhat". My chiro treats only my back and I have had no back problems since I started seeing him. I used to come up regularly with backaches. However, he has searched all over for a chiro to treat him and not found one that satisfied him. It would be an exaggeration that he complained that they were all quacks but he was not happy with any of them. My wife's stepfather, a practicing chiro did say that they were mostly all quacks.

Just for the record, let me say that I have no objection to "woo". It expresses something quite clearly, all that I demand of a word.
  #18  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:01 AM
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I've been to chiropracters twice for upper back problems. The MDs admit they have nothing but drugs to give me. The problems are unclear but probably just fibrous tissue getting stuck on mine spine somewhere. Perhap physical therapists have an answer as well. The first time I went to a chiropracter I was quite skeptical, but after explaining the problem, the guy looked at my back, and without any specific prompting stuck his finger on my back and said "Does it hurt right here?". He was right on target. Further research on the subject told me that chiropracters are very good at relieving back pain like this.

The only reason I went to see that guy is that I had been impressed by something that happened earlier. The wife of a friend had fallen and injured her wrist. She insisted on seeing a chiropracter and had gone to see him. He told her to go to a hospital and get Xrays, and then see an MD for treatment. So I knew he wasn't totally wrapped up in the pseudo-science.

My opinion on the matter is that chiropracters have an excellent knowledge of muscles and the skeleton, especially in the back where problems are common, and through manipulation are good at relieving pain. Other than that, chiropractic medical philosophy is utter nonsense.
  #19  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:17 AM
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Humm, well I didn't actually know about the new-age trippy bullshit that were the foundations of chiropractic or I would have voted differently.

I recently have been seeing a chiropractor and I've been happy with the out comes - my hips we quite jacked up from a c-section gone wrong and after a few treatments it feels much better.

FWIW, the lady I see has her office set up like a physiotherapists office and stresses mechanics - she's never said anything I would consider nutty or totally out there.

So I guess I would change my poll response from 'Not Woo.' to 'Depends who you get.'
  #20  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:38 AM
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Very interesting responses, and I've learned a lot so far! Thanks for sharing everyone.

Also, to those who don't like the word woo... in the politest way possible to you I say: suck it.

Last edited by drewtwo99; 12-09-2012 at 10:38 AM.
  #21  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:50 AM
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And I really hate the term "woo". It's infantile.
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Originally Posted by Kimmy_Gibbler View Post
Are we all four years old? Can we use grown-up words please? We have a perfectly fine term in "pseudoscience" and do not need to revert to baby talk like "woo."
I agree. Nobody can be taken seriously when they habitually use such words.

How about "quackery", can everyone accept that?
  #22  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:56 AM
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Personally I think the word 'woo' is a little infantile, but does adequately describe certain things. I think there's an old ATMB thread on the subject.
  #23  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:01 AM
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I can't speak to chiropractors in general, as I only have experience with two practices, but neither one tried to convince me that chiropractic treatments would do anything other than help with back pain, and both seemed to genuinely want my condition to improve enough that I would come in less frequently or not at all. During bad times I've gone in for an adjustment once or sometimes even twice a week, but after a few weeks of that I'm always feeling well enough to stop having regular appointments and just schedule one when I feel that I need one. I've sometimes gone for most of a year without having an adjustment, and my chiropractor hasn't seemed desperate to lure me back in.
  #24  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:02 AM
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Some years back, I was involved in a business networking group that met for lunch once or twice a month. A member of the group would speak for a bit about his or her business.

One month, the scheduled speaker was a chiropractor. He'd brought a PowerPoint, but the projector didn't work. So he punted and talked about poop while we ate. Based on his talk, I'm actually kind of grateful that the PowerPoint didn't work. Now whenever I pass by his office, I think of this presentation and can't think of him any other way than "Dr. Poopy".
  #25  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by minionkat View Post
My mother goes to the chiropractor every week. She swears she feels relief. That's good enough for me. I have been to his office (waiting for her) and seen the woo he pushes. She does not partake of any of his other "services". She acknowledges that they are crap. But she gets in so much pain in her back, that even if his manipulations are purely placebo effect, that's fine. Relief is relief. And her insurance covers most of it, so win/win.
Perhaps just plain vanilla massage would work for her as well.

And I go along with our illustrius SDAB SeniorBeef - so much woo and an occasional nugget of valid.

Me personally? With the damage of 3 fractured areas with one of them *very* high, nobody messes with my spinal column. I am not going to risk any of my hardearned movement to some whackjob mucking about.
  #26  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:13 AM
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I vote woo:

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/...-chiropractic/
  #27  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:23 AM
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Yes, and a physical therapist will treat you for a specified period of time and often give you home exercises or advice about how to move/work/exercise so that the pain does not return. A chiropractor generally wants to see you regularly forever.
This has also been my experience. I went to a chiropractor because my back was stiff; after two or three sessions, I felt much better. But they kept at me to keep coming back every week to "tune up" or something.

Later on, through no fault of theirs (as far as I could tell), I got frozen shoulder (I forget the technical term). They couldn't do anything for it, although they tried. So I went to my MD, got a referral to a specialist, had an MRI, got the diagnosis of what it really was, and had 3 months of PT to fix it. During this time, I didn't want the chiro manipulations to get in the way of progress so I stopped going. Never went back. Don't miss it.


Roddy
  #28  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:27 AM
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I see one that does ART and other stuff. The other ones I have seen were terrible.

I like this guy because he is not interested in seeing you every week for seven years. Three, four times tops, and he cuts you loose - if it hasn't worked, try something else.
  #29  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:29 AM
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Over a decade ago, I used to go to a chiropractor about once per month for manipulation. He cracked my neck and my back. The neck cracking was very loud & scary, but felt awesome. Back cracking was pure bliss and I just felt better overall after the experience (kind of like how you feel after a good massage or workout).

But then one time during routine chit chat, I mentioned that my (then 4 year old nephew) had been diagnosed with celiacs disease. He recommended that I have my sister bring him in, because he could cure this with proper alignment . I never went back.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:09 PM
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Some woo, some legit.

I wind up with sciatica every three or four years and have since an auto accident in my twenties. The pain is horrific. It hurts to sit, it hurts to stand and it hurts to lie down. Over the years, I've found that legit chiro is about the only thing that offers relief. YMMV.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:39 PM
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All I know is that I never experienced even a modicum of relief from my neck and back problems until I stopped going to the chiropractor. Once I did; Voila!...The problems resolved themselves on their own in a matter of about a week or two.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:40 PM
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What I don't get is how they are allowed to call themselves "Doctors".
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:23 PM
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Voted "somewhat woo." I went to a chiropractor for about a year in 2009-10 to treat some back pain, and he never tried to sell me on chiropractic being a miracle cure for other disorders. I had good results, some of which may have been the placebo effect. However, I do believe in chiropractic for back discomfort/pain for one simple reason: when my neck or back bothers me, I crack the affected area, and it feels better. Chiropractic adjustment worked the same way for me, only he was able to crack parts I couldn't dream of doing on my own.

He did also put the electric stimulating probes on my back, but I don't think they actually did anything.
  #34  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:23 PM
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How about "quackery", can everyone accept that?
I prefer "bullshit".
  #35  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:29 PM
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I'm sure there are a lot of woo-ful chiropractors out there, but speaking only for mine, it helps tremendously with specific problems. I've been in agonizing pain for weeks, gone in to see the guy, and walked out feeling 99% better.

Now, my chiropractor makes no effort to prolong visits or make me come in for no reason. He does try to get me to take certain supplements, which I politely refuse. But whatever he does, it works. I can hear and feel things snapping into place, and relieving the pressure.

ETA: I'm probably one of the biggest anti-woo posters on this MB.

Last edited by John Mace; 12-09-2012 at 01:31 PM.
  #36  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:34 PM
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ETA: I'm probably one of the biggest anti-woo posters on this MB.
Not right now you're not!

Seriously, the chiropractic theory has been debunked as thoroughly as alchemy, homeopathy, geocentrism, and the ether. Schools of chiropracty have not yet acknowledged this. Some individual chiropractors realize this and some of those try to do some good with manipulation, which has shown a small benefit for some in the short run.

But it's a complete pseudoscience.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:39 PM
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The problem with chiropractors isn't that many of them are woo-woo new age idiots. The problem is that there's no easy way to tell which ones those are. The legitimate chiropractors out there (and yes, there are a few of them) need to set up some sort of professional certification, perhaps under the aegis of the AMA or some other existing organization, and reject all of their idiot colleagues.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:41 PM
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Some individual chiropractors realize this and some of those try to do some good with manipulation, which has shown a small benefit for some in the short run.
Not sure how this makes it "woo". All I'm looking for is symptomatic relief, and I get that.
  #39  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:44 PM
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The problem with chiropractors isn't that many of them are woo-woo new age idiots. The problem is that there's no easy way to tell which ones those are. The legitimate chiropractors out there (and yes, there are a few of them) need to set up some sort of professional certification, perhaps under the aegis of the AMA or some other existing organization, and reject all of their idiot colleagues.
That's been tried by scientific chiropractors, who reject chiropractic theory and wish to emphasize the benefits of manipulation for various musclo-skeletal complaints. They found themselves savaged and ostrasized by the traditional chiropractic community, and the AMA (which is just a lobbying group) doesn't want anything to do with any of them.
  #40  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:48 PM
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Well, that was a short-lived poll.

I'd have gone for "other option". About 99% of what chiropractors claim to be able to do (treat asthma, diarrhea and other internal medical complaints, solve fertility problems, treat "nutritional deficiences" etc.) is nonsense, leaving a residue of "hands-on manipulation can relieve musculoskeletal pain", which puts them in a sizable category of practitioners including masseuses and physical therapists. Negative points are awarded chiropractic for its members' endorsement of other forms of woo (naturopathy, homeopathy, anti-vaccine propagandizing and so on).

And what's with the disdain for a perfectly fine term, woo? It's short, accurate and to the point, plus it drives the woo-sters bonkers.
  #41  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:55 PM
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I suspect a major reason that "scientific"/"evidence-based" chiropractic has not caught on much, is that it's not easy making a living just doing manipulation.

We've got a local chiro who believes he's competent to address nutritional problems, "female hormone issues", "detoxification", type II diabetes, hypothyroidism, autoimmune conditions and weight loss. Judging by the big ads he runs in the paper on a frequent basis, his income must be sizable.

Last edited by Jackmannii; 12-09-2012 at 01:55 PM.
  #42  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:56 PM
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Not sure how this makes it "woo". All I'm looking for is symptomatic relief, and I get that.
Well, if you go to the brothel to enjoy the piano music, you're not engaging in the 'woohoo' which is the main purpose of the establishment.

The main purpose of the science of chiropracty is to treat all diseases via spinal manipulation. That's because according to their theory, it's blocked 'nerve flow' that is responsible for all diseases. It's a lucky coincidence that manipulation does help certain folks with musculo-skeletal complaints, but those complaints are not caused by 'blocked nerve flow'. Even an actual pinched nerve does not behave according to chiropractic theory.

ETA: I think "woo" is a fine term also. And I've been battling against it longer than a lot of posters here have been alive, dadgummit!

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 12-09-2012 at 01:57 PM.
  #43  
Old 12-09-2012, 02:18 PM
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The problem with words like "pseudoscience" and "quackery" is that the believers might not be able to understand words of more than two syllables. "Woo", on the other hand, is only one syllable, so they can understand it. It's also a sneering dismissal of such beliefs, which adds to the fun.
  #44  
Old 12-09-2012, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Well, if you go to the brothel to enjoy the piano music, you're not engaging in the 'woohoo' which is the main purpose of the establishment.

The main purpose of the science of chiropracty is to treat all diseases via spinal manipulation. That's because according to their theory, it's blocked 'nerve flow' that is responsible for all diseases. It's a lucky coincidence that manipulation does help certain folks with musculo-skeletal complaints, but those complaints are not caused by 'blocked nerve flow'. Even an actual pinched nerve does not behave according to chiropractic theory.
OK. I never considered that it purported to treat "all diseases", so to the extent it does, I'll go with "woo". But it does help with a lot of "musculo-skeltal" problems I have, so I'm not ready to say 100% woo. It's like if I dislocate my shoulder and someone not trained as a medical doctor pops it back in place, I'm OK with that.
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:38 PM
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The problem with words like "pseudoscience" and "quackery" is that the believers might not be able to understand words of more than two syllables. "Woo", on the other hand, is only one syllable, so they can understand it. It's also a sneering dismissal of such beliefs, which adds to the fun.
I am also more confident that the average poster can spell "woo". I don't like to think how irritated I'd be after reading a thread full of multiple-choice spellings of "pseudoscience."
  #46  
Old 12-09-2012, 03:19 PM
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Quite frankly, I don't know why the government allows chiropractors to practice. The fundamental premise of it seems totally wrong; so any good results from it are either from the placebo effect, or from the body's own healing. The "neck adjustment" ( violently snapping the head around) has been linked to several deaths, I would never submit to such a procedure.
Anyway, my big question: if your spine becomes "out of adjustment", and you go to a chiroquack, he/she "adjusts it"-what keeps it from falling "out of adjustment"?
They (chiropractors) are probably qualified to do massage..anything beyond that, I'd pass on.
  #47  
Old 12-09-2012, 03:30 PM
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Anyway, my big question: if your spine becomes "out of adjustment", and you go to a chiroquack, he/she "adjusts it"-what keeps it from falling "out of adjustment"?
Nothing. That's why you have to go back again the next week.
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Old 12-09-2012, 03:59 PM
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ETA: I think "woo" is a fine term also. And I've been battling against it longer than a lot of posters here have been alive, dadgummit!
I understand that you're a real medical doctor - can you tell us, if you know, how these quacks are allowed to call themselves "doctors"?
  #49  
Old 12-09-2012, 04:12 PM
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I understand that you're a real medical doctor - can you tell us, if you know, how these quacks are allowed to call themselves "doctors"?
Well, their degree is "Doctor of Chiropractic". There are folks out there with "Doctor of Homeopathy", "Doctor of Naturopathy", "Doctor of acupuncture and oriental medicine" and so on and so forth.

Doesn't mean the degree is worth anything. There were doctors of alchemy in days gone by.

People who advertise their services as a "Doctor" are generally required to state where they got their degree from, and what area of study it was in. But otherwise the State tends to not decide who can call themselves a doctor. Practicing as one is subject to regulations, but said regulations are not generally based on on science.
  #50  
Old 12-09-2012, 04:12 PM
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ETA: I'm probably one of the biggest anti-woo posters on this MB.
Not that I've ever noticed.

Cite?

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Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
And what's with the disdain for a perfectly fine term, woo? It's short, accurate and to the point, plus it drives the woo-sters bonkers.
That's exactly what's wrong with it. It's designed to aggravate. People who say "woo" all the time very often do so with the specific intent of causing annoyance.

This is not a useful thing to do when trying to fight ignorance.
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