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Old 06-04-2017, 11:53 PM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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How best to care for a wild pig?

SHORT VERSION: A wild pig is trapped in a cage on our property, and the trap-setter is nowhere to be found, so I'm trying to take care of the pig since it seems incredibly cruel just to let it languish. What does it need, food and water-wise?

TLDR version: I'm on the Big Island of Hawaii for most of the summer, enjoying our delightfully rustic property here (I call it "our little piece of Appalachia in the tropics," if that helps you visualize it a little).

Anyway, we're always battling something, and at the moment it is wild pigs. They look cute as hell, but they can actually be a bit vicious, and they wreak havoc on the land. They root through the soil for grubs, destroying gardens, promoting erosion (our land is really sloped as it is on the side of a volcano), and uncovering tree roots for us to trip on. Since I arrived a little over a week ago, we've had two sets of sows, each with three piglets, wandering about.

This being the case, one of our tenants got a local guy to set pig traps. He catches the pigs in large traps (they don't hurt the pig, just slam a cage door shut) and smokes the meat. (Serious yum - kalau pig is a Hawaiian favorite.)

All well and good, but yesterday morning we had a trapped sow in our front yard, and the pig guy is nowhere to be found. The tenants have gone off to the mainland for a month, so they are no help.

Assuming the pig got trapped only moments before I saw it, the poor thing has been in there for about 36 hours now. Initially it had lots of food (the pig guy had salted the trap with lots of rotting lychees just a day before) but these were long gone by early yesterday. We have fed the pig an apple, a sweet potato muffin, and a blob of leftover cookie dough. It rained for a long time last night so the pig may have gotten hydration from that, and I ran a hose into the trap for a while this afternoon, creating some muddy puddles of water that lasted a while (the pig didn't seem desperately thirsty, as it didn't drink from the puddles).

I feel terrible for the pig, which at first was frantic - I think she is the mother of the three older piglets. They have not been around, and her udders are not visible, so I think the piglets are old enough to manage. Anyway, the first day mama pig hurled herself against the edges of the cage and seemed anxious to attack if she had a chance. But since I have brought her food and water she no longer goes beserk when I walk by. Or it could just be she is getting tired and resigned.

I wish the pig guy would come. He's been told by the coconut wire that there's a pig here, and he has yet to show up (I don't know how to get in touch with him directly, unfortunately.) So what can I do to keep the pig comfortable until the pig guy comes back? How much food does she need? What should I feed her - it will be table scraps no matter what, but should I focus on veggies, beef, starches, or what? I have some raw sweet potatoes, should I give her some of those?

For anyone thinking, "let the pig out!" that's something I'd consider, but I don't know how to do it and it might be unwise, as the pig (really it's a boar) has lunged aggressively at me sometimes. As a last resort, that's what I'll try.

Originally I had wanted some of the pig meat, but I'm sort of changing my mind now. She's kind of like a pet out there. It's touching that she is calmer when I approach the cage to give her food now.

Poor piggie
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Old 06-05-2017, 12:04 AM
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Pigs, as you know, will eat most anything. Since the pig presumably will be in the trap only a matter of days, it doesn't much matter what you feed it. Sweet potatoes should be fine, or any other nutritious stuff that's cheap.

Considering how destructive they are in Hawaii, I would let it out only as an absolute last resort.
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Old 06-05-2017, 12:08 AM
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Sweetie, it's touching that you think she is becoming used to you and calming down, but it is a lot more likely that she is "calming down" because she is dying, BECAUSE SHE IS TRAPPED IN A BOX.

Sorry for that. I would try to get somebody to let her out. Go to the nearest little town and tell any guy there your story. Someone will be glad to either open the trap or take the trap home .
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Old 06-05-2017, 12:14 AM
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Sweetie, it's touching that you think she is becoming used to you and calming down, but it is a lot more likely that she is "calming down" because she is dying, BECAUSE SHE IS TRAPPED IN A BOX.
Sorry, that's ridiculous. A healthy pig that has received food and water won't be dying after just a day and a half in a cage.

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Sorry for that. I would try to get somebody to let her out. Go to the nearest little town and tell any guy there your story. Someone will be glad to either open the trap or take the trap home .
As I said, and as the OP indicates, pigs are extremely destructive to the environment in Hawaii. They are severe pests. That would be a very bad thing to do. It would also probably piss off the pig catcher (although he should have come by to check the trap).

Last edited by Colibri; 06-05-2017 at 12:15 AM.
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Old 06-05-2017, 12:21 AM
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I lived in Hawaii. The pigs are everywhere. One pig is not going to matter to the ecosystem. You are advocating leaving a wild animal trapped in a box for what, days? Weeks?

Some local guy (as I advised) IS going to know whether it is right right to either release the pig or take it home for dinner.
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Old 06-05-2017, 12:28 AM
kopek kopek is offline
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I would contact
http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/
http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/recreation/hunting/

They have the resources and know the right phone numbers. It is also possible they may want to follow-up on the trapper. Trapping pigs; good. Unnecessary cruelty by not checking your traps on a regular basis; bad.
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:38 AM
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I lived in Hawaii. The pigs are everywhere. One pig is not going to matter to the ecosystem. You are advocating leaving a wild animal trapped in a box for what, days? Weeks?
Of course I am not advocating leaving it in the cage for weeks. IMO leaving it in there for a couple days is not particularly cruel. Many pets and especially domestic animals are subjected to the same kind of confinement for that length of time, or in the case of domestic animals much longer. And the pig is certainly not dying, as you claimed.

You seem to be losing sight of the fact that the pig was captured specifically in order to kill it and use the meat. This pig is not enduring more than many pigs raised for market.

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Some local guy (as I advised) IS going to know whether it is right right to either release the pig or take it home for dinner.
The guy trapped it in order to smoke the meat, as the OP says. He certainly didn't catch it in order for someone else to release it. There is an issue in that the guy is irresponsible in not checking his traps more frequently, but why he's trapping pigs is not in question.

Last edited by Colibri; 06-05-2017 at 11:45 AM.
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Old 06-05-2017, 01:15 PM
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I would veto releasing it. As noted, the wild pigs are really doing a number on the land in Hawaii and they are dangerous on top of that.

Call the numbers Kopek posted. In the meantime, it is good of you not to let her suffer. Water is good. A bowl if you can position it, which you can then reach with a hose. Pigs, as mentioned, eat anything, so your table scraps will be fine.
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Old 06-05-2017, 01:30 PM
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Bullet to the back of the head and to the burn pile, if you aren't going to clean it and eat it.

Last edited by Omar Little; 06-05-2017 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 06-05-2017, 02:24 PM
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The area where I live has a similar problem with feral swine, and I've seen how they destroy crops and natural environment.

Honestly, I'd slip some sort of water pan into the cage and feed the pig one enough pineapple, apples and nuts that it stays healthy and fairly happy, and also tastes that much better when that time comes around.
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Old 06-05-2017, 02:48 PM
Quimby Quimby is offline
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BBQ Sauce.





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Old 06-05-2017, 03:07 PM
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[QUOTE=Quimby;20255492]BBQ Sauce.

No. No. No.

Kalua pig is the bomb.
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Old 06-05-2017, 03:44 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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This could be a good chance to get rid of any enemies you have nearby. Just feed them to the pig.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 06-05-2017 at 03:47 PM.
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Old 06-05-2017, 04:43 PM
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This could be a good chance to get rid of any enemies you have nearby. Just feed them to the pig.
Al Swearengen: "You know what to do with him, boys. Take him to Wu's."
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Old 06-05-2017, 05:37 PM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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BBQ Sauce.
No. No. No.

Kalua pig is the bomb.
I know - that typo was bothering me too. I didn't notice it at the time I made it, as "kalau" is a very common word in Indonesian, which I spend a fair bit of time communicating in. But when I read it later, I was distressed.

Last edited by Colibri; 06-05-2017 at 05:41 PM. Reason: fix coding
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Old 06-05-2017, 05:44 PM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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Also, I guess I should give an update, or lack thereof: the pig is still in the cage, and we're on day 3 so I am getting pretty exasperated. She seems healthy although she had the nerve not to devour the entire sweet potato I cut into large chunks for her this morning. Ungrateful swine! It was a beautiful purple sweet potato - a nice big one, fantastic for cooking into a number of delicious dishes. Oh well, I have more. And she ate some of it, just not all of it at once. I guess it's a good thing if she isn't starving.

I now have the phone number for the friend of the tenant who suggested Sam (the pig trapper) and have left a message with her. But she hasn't called back and Sam is still no where to be seen.

I'm not going to call the authorities kopek suggested just yet, though I greatly appreciate the suggestion. As those of you familiar with more rural Hawaiian areas know, it probably wouldn't be a great idea for a haolie malihini (outside white person) to call the authorities on a local guy as one of my first official acts while gradually moving in. But I will seek help from them (though I may tell them I don't know the trapper's name) if this drags on.

I'll update the thread when something happens.

Last edited by CairoCarol; 06-05-2017 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 06-05-2017, 05:52 PM
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Any food a person would eat a pig can eat. The real humane issue is water. If it gets enough water it will be fine. But yeah, dick move to set the trap and then not be around. He should have disabled his traps before leaving for a couple days. If you're concerned you can probably convince somebody from somewhere to come out and shoot it. Don't let it out, that's asking for getting your ass kicked by a berserk pig.

Last edited by Lemur866; 06-05-2017 at 05:53 PM.
  #18  
Old 06-05-2017, 06:07 PM
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Legally, who owns the pig in this case?

I'd say to find someone to kill the pig for you and have your own Kālua pig luau. But I know nothing about porcine salvage law in Hawaii.
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Old 06-05-2017, 08:25 PM
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Al Swearengen: "You know what to do with him, boys. Take him to Wu's."
Or the Reverend Billy C Wirtz: Help control the pet and animal population ---- eat at a Chinese Buffet at least once a week.
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Old 06-05-2017, 08:41 PM
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Good call on feeding sweetish foods to, basically, finish the meat (like grain-finished steers who are mostly grass-fed before that) and you should get some meat for free for your troubles.

And shame on any trapper who doesn't come back to check his traps. Guy better have a damn good excuse, or he should lose his trapping permit if such formalities exist.


Quote:
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This could be a good chance to get rid of any enemies you have nearby. Just feed them to the pig.
Reminds me, I haven't re-watched "Snatch" in a while.
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Old 06-05-2017, 08:56 PM
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Legally, who owns the pig in this case?

I'd say to find someone to kill the pig for you and have your own Kālua pig luau. But I know nothing about porcine salvage law in Hawaii.
It the pig is on the property of the poster (which the o.p. appears to suggest) and the law permits harvesting the pig without permit, it seems likely that it is the property of the o.p. The trapper may have a claim of civil interference if she manipulates the trap but since she has made a presumably good faith attempt to contact the trapper without success she can make the argument for necessity of action, both to remove a nuisance and out of concern formthe animal's well being (e.g. unexperienced tastiness).

As for sympathy to the animal, feral (not "wild") pigs are not native to the islands. They can be quite destructive to flora, fauna, and property as well as a potential hazard to people (unusual but sows are quite protective of litters). The animal was trapped specifically because of its nuisence potential and should be taken as intended. Wildlife (or in this case, feral) populations of animals have to be managed for the well being of ecosystems as well as protecting people and property.

Stranger
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Old 06-05-2017, 09:16 PM
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RIP Piggie

Update - Sam appeared! It turns out he wanted to come deal on Sunday, but couldn't buy bullets. So he showed up today and quickly and cleanly shot and removed the pig. He has re-set the trap, but now I have his number so I can call him directly if there is another capture.

Regarding who owns the pig - without consulting any legal code, I'd say that since we (not me personally, but a tenant on the property) asked Sam to come as a favor and trap pigs, interfering with that process should only be done as a last resort.

Technically speaking, I could probably request some of the meat he smokes. According to my son, who was listening to the conversation, he did sort of offer me some when he came out to set the trap last week (I missed it but the way I recall the conversation, it is likely my son is right).

However, there is a HUGE amount of work between setting a trap and ending up with delicious kalua pig, none of which I am doing. So I told Sam I'd be happy to buy some meat from him. He told me his auntie is getting married in a while and he's trying to prepare as much pig as possible for the festivities, so I told him no worries if he doesn't have any meat to spare now. If he has enough later, I'll take some then.

We have each other's phone numbers, so I can call him if there is another pig in the trap, and he can call me if he has some delicious kalua pig for me.

Now, the pig wasn't a pet so I suppose the photo rule does not apply, but hey, what the heck:

The pig, in the cage, our splendid nature behind her, and you can see how she has totally uprooted the soil within the cage.

Bonus photo for people who are extremely thorough SDMB readers with good memories: here's another shot that shows the Buddha statue, the mysterious disappearance of which I mentioned in another thread.
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:15 PM
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Just to be clear, I am not the Sam who appeared and shot the pig.

RIP, Piggy. We hardly knew ye.
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:22 PM
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That's one mean looking piggy. Definitely better off barbecued.
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:37 PM
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Thanks for the update and bonus pics. FWIW that cage was much bigger than I was envisioning.

I did read the disappearing statue thread but didn't make the connection.

Ah, the old "couldn't buy bullets" excuse. If I had a nickel...
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:29 PM
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Is there a way to manage a feral pig population on an island besides shooting them? Like releasing some pumas or something?

How are they there in the first place?
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:48 PM
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Is there a way to manage a feral pig population on an island besides shooting them? Like releasing some pumas or something?

How are they there in the first place?
It's believed they were brought to the islands by Polynesians who settled in Hawaii around 800 years ago. They were not penned, but allowed to roam free and shared by several families.

http://westhawaiitoday.com/news/loca...al-polynesians
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:09 AM
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...And another pig just got caught! A bigger one, this time. She's still nursing, I think - her udders are very visible. Her three babies are hanging out around the cage. That's sad.
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Old 06-06-2017, 04:48 AM
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It is sad; if it only meant less destruction. It's great to hear how things are working out between you and your neighbors though.
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Old 06-06-2017, 05:09 AM
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Also, I guess I should give an update, or lack thereof: the pig is still in the cage, and we're on day 3 so I am getting pretty exasperated. She seems healthy although she had the nerve not to devour the entire sweet potato I cut into large chunks for her this morning. Ungrateful swine! It was a beautiful purple sweet potato - a nice big one, fantastic for cooking into a number of delicious dishes. Oh well, I have more. And she ate some of it, just not all of it at once. I guess it's a good thing if she isn't starving.
That's how pigs eat, normally; they don't gorge. Gorging is a carnivore problem. It means she was actually fine, if a bit lacking for space.
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Old 06-06-2017, 07:30 AM
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Like releasing some pumas or something?
Or dogs?

Or bees?

Or dogs with bees in their mouths, and when they bark they shoot bees at you?
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Old 06-06-2017, 07:49 AM
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...And another pig just got caught! A bigger one, this time. She's still nursing, I think - her udders are very visible. Her three babies are hanging out around the cage. That's sad.
If life gives you lemons...
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Old 06-06-2017, 08:36 AM
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...And another pig just got caught! A bigger one, this time. She's still nursing, I think - her udders are very visible. Her three babies are hanging out around the cage. That's sad.
Destructive or not, you are committing animal abuse towards those piglets. If you were truly sincere when you said "that's sad" you would've sprung the trap instead of pretending to feel sorry for them on the internet.
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Old 06-06-2017, 08:39 AM
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Destructive or not, you are committing animal abuse towards those piglets. If you were truly sincere when you said "that's sad" you would've sprung the trap instead of pretending to feel sorry for them on the internet.
Uh? The trap is already sprung. It's full of hog.
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Old 06-06-2017, 08:57 AM
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Uh? The trap is already sprung. It's full of hog.
[Homer]Mmm, full of hog...[/Homer]
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Old 06-06-2017, 09:12 AM
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Or dogs?

Or bees?

Or dogs with bees in their mouths, and when they bark they shoot bees at you?
Sharks with laser beams? Sharktopus? Pirhanacondas? Or just turn Roger Corman loose in the wild?
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Old 06-06-2017, 10:56 AM
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Destructive or not, you are committing animal abuse towards those piglets. If you were truly sincere when you said "that's sad" you would've sprung the trap instead of pretending to feel sorry for them on the internet.
Again, that's nonsense. The purpose of trapping the pigs is to control the population. The most humane way to do this is to get the pig trapper back as soon as possible to catch or kill the piglets along with the mother.

I worked with the New Zealand Wildlife Service for 3 years and saw the destruction that introduced wildlife such as cats, stoats, deer, pigs, and other species can do. They have caused the extinction of large numbers of island species including many birds (including some in Hawaii). Unfortunately people often feel more sympathy for these pest species than the native wildlife they are killing off.
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Old 06-06-2017, 11:15 AM
skdo23 skdo23 is offline
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Uh? The trap is already sprung. It's full of hog.
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Again, that's nonsense. The purpose of trapping the pigs is to control the population. The most humane way to do this is to get the pig trapper back as soon as possible to catch or kill the piglets along with the mother.

I worked with the New Zealand Wildlife Service for 3 years and saw the destruction that introduced wildlife such as cats, stoats, deer, pigs, and other species can do. They have caused the extinction of large numbers of island species including many birds (including some in Hawaii). Unfortunately people often feel more sympathy for these pest species than the native wildlife they are killing off.
Ok if two fellow Dopers that I respect, including one with firsthand experience, think I went too far with my earlier post then I probably did. My apologies to the OP, but please tell me you are also feeding the piglets.
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Old 06-06-2017, 11:18 AM
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Or dogs?

Or bees?

Or dogs with bees in their mouths, and when they bark they shoot bees at you?
Or badgers maybe. I'm not sure though as FOX took down WhatBadgersEat.com years ago.

Last edited by skdo23; 06-06-2017 at 11:20 AM.
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:16 PM
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Ok if two fellow Dopers that I respect, including one with firsthand experience, think I went too far with my earlier post then I probably did. My apologies to the OP, but please tell me you are also feeding the piglets.
I think it's fine to be as humane as possible when the control of pest animals is needed. The trapped sow and the piglets should certainly be fed and given water if possible until the pig trapper returns.

However, I think it's important not to lose sight of a couple of things:

First, almost all animals in the wild suffer painful and distressing deaths. They may be eaten alive, or if not will die of disease or starvation when they get too old to find food. These pigs may be hungry or frightened for a few hours or days, but they will ultimately suffer less than a normal death in the wild.

Second, pest animals cause the death of many other animals. These pigs are likely consuming birds' nests or eating food that may be needed by other animals, some of them endangered. Preserving the life of a pig is dooming many other animals.

Last edited by Colibri; 06-06-2017 at 12:17 PM.
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:38 PM
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All of the above stipulated; if you want to feed the pig, go to the library and check out a copy of Charlotte's Web. you'll find a couple of passages describing the tasty array of comestibles that find their way into Wilbur's trough.

One presumes that now you've got Sam's contact information, this shouldn't be much of an issue in the future.

One thing I've found confusing in this thread: In the OP, you state both that the animal is (was) a sow and a boar. Is this really possible? Like saying that a horse is a mare and a stallion? Or that a chicken is a hen and a rooster?
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:48 PM
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Wild pigs are an aggressive cancer on the species diversity of the Hawaiian Islands. The need to be killed young or old. Pigs are incredibly prolific and amazingly hardy, even piglets barely off the teat can make out in the wild.

See this JAGER PRO™ Hog Trapping (20)- Wild Piglet Survival without Sow
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Old 06-06-2017, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
One thing I've found confusing in this thread: In the OP, you state both that the animal is (was) a sow and a boar. Is this really possible? Like saying that a horse is a mare and a stallion? Or that a chicken is a hen and a rooster?
"Boar" can mean both the original Eurasian wild pig from which domestic pigs are descended, or male hog. I suspect the OP was using it in the former sense. (Technically, this is not correct, since the wild pigs in Hawaii are feral and descended from domestic stock, rather than from wild stock. There are introduced Eurasian Wild Boars in the Great Smokies along with feral pigs.
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Old 06-06-2017, 01:31 PM
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Like releasing some pumas or something?
That's not all that original, given they've already released Nike's.
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Old 06-06-2017, 01:46 PM
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Wow, interesting to get up in the morning and read the comments - you never know when a thread is going to gain traction around here.

Okay, two things to address:

1) Referring to a "boar" - I guess I didn't know the specifics of what that means. To me, a "pig" is a domesticated animal, even a cute one under the right circumstances, with a curly-ish tail, pinkish skin, reasonable-size eyes, and little hair. A "boar" is a wild thing, not particularly cute except in juvenile form, with a straight tail, blackish skin, tiny eyes, and covered in bristles. It seems my understanding/language use is a little incorrect. (I've also considered "wild" and "feral" as interchangeable terms, which I gather is also wrong.)

So to be more accurate, I guess I should stick with referring to the animals in this thread as "feral pigs," although a male could be referred to as a "boar." Is that right?

2) Animal cruelty issue - well, a couple of things. First, the piglets can get in and out of the cage as it has a rather large opening at one end, big enough for the small ones to slip in and be with mom. At first I thought I was seeing things ("wait, I thought there was one sow in there...did one of the babies get trapped there with her?") but now I realize what's going on. She's had a baby in there "visiting" at least a couple of times that I've noticed.

From what I've been able to observe this morning (and obviously, I ain't no wildlife biologist), the three piglets spend part of their time with mom and also wander off on their own. Mom tends to be more agitated when they are visible to her but not right next to her. The piglets seem fairly mellow, actually. Right now they are sauntering away from mom and going under the house with no apparent care in the world. (But I shouldn't anthropomorphize, I know.)

Hopefully Sam will know what to do. My guess is that if possible he'd like to get all four of them at once, but of course that is dependent on him arriving when the piglets are here, and I imagine they might run off when he comes. He's probably encountered similar situations before, given how rampant the pig population h as gotten.

Second, I'm not happy about mom being trapped/killed while she's still got young piglets, and I hope we can resolve it as kindly as possible, but as others have said (and skdo23, I appreciate you trying to be open-minded about the facts) the pigs are a real problem here, and unfortunately doing pig control requires a little bit of "nature red in tooth and claw" acceptance along with understanding that the pigs are very damaging to the environment. And as Colibri points out, it's not like they were guaranteed an idyllic life if they weren't trapped. They get hit by cars, for example; we had a dead pig on the road outside our house just a couple days ago.

One last thing - the joke about pumas and predators: my husband ordered some "crystallized mountain lion pee" after reading on line that some guy here swears by it. At some point we may use it, but if it does discourage the pigs it only solves *our* problem by displacing the pigs to somewhere else. Also it has to be re-spread every time it rains, which for us is...constantly (our house is smack-dab in the middle of the dark blue spot, I kid you not.)
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Old 06-06-2017, 02:46 PM
arseNal arseNal is offline
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So these pigs are delicious? I seem to recall reading that one of the problems regarding the invasive feral hog problem in Texas is that they don't taste very good, so there's less incentive to hunt them for food (or sale as such). What makes the island pig tastier than the mainland ones?
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Old 06-06-2017, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by CairoCarol View Post
So to be more accurate, I guess I should stick with referring to the animals in this thread as "feral pigs," although a male could be referred to as a "boar." Is that right?
That's correct. Feral pigs in some places are called "razorbacks."
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Old 06-06-2017, 03:10 PM
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It's believed they were brought to the islands by Polynesians who settled in Hawaii around 800 years ago. They were not penned, but allowed to roam free and shared by several families.

http://westhawaiitoday.com/news/loca...al-polynesians
800 years? That seems like a long time for them to become acclimated to the environment. How are they still pests?
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Old 06-06-2017, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by arseNal View Post
So these pigs are delicious? I seem to recall reading that one of the problems regarding the invasive feral hog problem in Texas is that they don't taste very good, so there's less incentive to hunt them for food (or sale as such). What makes the island pig tastier than the mainland ones?
Could it be how they're prepared? Native Hawaiians have been eating them for centuries and maybe they've come up with ways to make them taste good. Maybe Texans should look at the Hawaiians' preparation and cooking methods.

Or maybe it's the particular genetic strains in Texas vs Hawaii, or maybe it's the diet available to the pigs.
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Old 06-06-2017, 03:43 PM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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800 years? That seems like a long time for them to become acclimated to the environment. How are they still pests?
I am also curious about this. They have only become pests around here fairly recently. They were not a problem in our neighborhood in 2002, when we bought our property.

But the invasive species around here seem to be using a Trump Distraction Strategy. Since 2002, for a while everyone was fussed about the African Tulip trees (aka "trash trees") and some sort of vine. Those are still around (I can see a trash tree directly in my line of sight out the window now - at least it's very pretty) but people don't seem to bother talking about them any more. Next, it was the coqui frogs - I dunno how much pesticide was sprayed and how much ground cover hacked away to control them, but it didn't work and now they are just part of the landscape. And now, it's the PIGS.

Who knows what it will be next. Not brown tree snakes, I hope.
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