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  #1  
Old 01-13-2018, 11:11 PM
adaher adaher is offline
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What old movies should I watch?

I was born in 1974 and as a general rule I don't watch much in cinema prior to then. The only movies I've seen that predate that are kung fu movies, monster movies, and Disney movies. I've just never liked classic cinema all that much.

But now my horizons are expanding and I'm interested in trying some and I'd like to get opinions on what's good. Here's what I know I don't care for:

Romances- I don't mind modern romcoms but I just can't put up with an old style romance flick like Breakfast at Tiffany's.

Hitchcock-I've never had much of a love for suspense movies to begin with, and what little I've seen of Hitchcock tries my patience.

Gangster films- Don't like the genre today, wouldn't appreciate it back then.

Spaghetti Westerns- I'm not opposed to Westerns in general, but if I'm going to watch one it needs to be more than Cowboys and Indians and gun duels.

Here's what I do like:

Action
War movies
Dramas about important issues
Horror. Not suspense horror, but supernatural horror.
Disaster! Love disaster films, although cheesy stuff like invasions of giant spiders doesn't really hold up for me anymore.
Political thrillers. Now that I think about it, I have seen Dr. Strangelove. Stuff like that is cool.
Scifi with good science. Not "message" scifi like the Day the Earth Stood Still, or camp sci fi like nuclear radiation making giant creatures.
Non-Disney animation I might not know about.

I'm ashamed to admit that I've never seen a Sean Connery Bond movie. Except for Never Say Never Again, which was 1983.

Last edited by adaher; 01-13-2018 at 11:12 PM.
  #2  
Old 01-13-2018, 11:16 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is online now
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I don’t think one can go wrong with a Jimmy Stewart movie. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Harvey, It’s a Wonderful Life, Glenn Miller Story, Flight of the Phoenix, Spirit of St. Louis, Anatomy of a Murder. And of course a bunch of Hitchcock but...

I don’t really like old movies. My dad watches them every day and I find them to be terribly slow. But for some reason I like almost every Stewart movie I’ve ever seen.
  #3  
Old 01-13-2018, 11:33 PM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is offline
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For westerns: The Big Country. Try some silents. Buster Keaton is (imho) the best. The General and Steamboat Bill Jr. are wonderful. Chaplin's The Kid is also great. Harold Lloyd's Safety Last is famous for the climb, but I like the scenes inside the department store more.
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Old 01-13-2018, 11:44 PM
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You didn't mention how you feel about comedies. There was an era of literate, screwball comedies. I'm partial to the original My Man Godfrey and The Thin Man (try the original before the sequels) is good. William Powell was the man.

Every science fiction movie can trace a lineage back to Metropolis. It may be a bit too heavy on the message for your taste, but it's mesmerizing to look at. If you think you can marvel at what the 1920s thought the future would look like, check it out.

The Big Sleep is good. I think that was the first pairing of Bogart and Bacall. It's a detective movie where you don't know who's guilty, or even what crime was committed, and the dialog and characters are so good that it doesn't even matter.

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Originally Posted by Son of a Rich View Post
For westerns: The Big Country. Try some silents. Buster Keaton is (imho) the best. The General and Steamboat Bill Jr. are wonderful. Chaplin's The Kid is also great. Harold Lloyd's Safety Last is famous for the climb, but I like the scenes inside the department store more.
Agreed on Keaton; the Jackie Chan of his age.
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Old 01-13-2018, 11:57 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Horror. Not suspense horror, but supernatural horror.
Two of the great classic horror series were the Universal horror movies of the thirties and the Hammer horror movies of the sixties.

Universal:
Dracula (1931)
Frankenstein (1931)
The Mummy (1932)
The Invisible Man (1933)
Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
The Wolfman (1941)

Hammer:
The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)
Dracula (1958)
The Mummy (1959)
The Brides of Dracula (1960)
The Plague of the Zombies (1966)
The Devil Rides Out (1968)

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Political thrillers. Now that I think about it, I have seen Dr. Strangelove. Stuff like that is cool.
The Manchurian Candidate (1962)
Seven Days in May (1964)
Fail Safe (1964)
The Day of the Jackal (1973)
Executive Action (1973)
The Parallax View (1974)

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Scifi with good science. Not "message" scifi like the Day the Earth Stood Still, or camp sci fi like nuclear radiation making giant
No Blade of Grass (1970)
THX 1138 (1971)
Silent Running (1972)
Solaris (1972)
Dark Star (1974)
Rollerball (1974)

Last edited by Little Nemo; 01-13-2018 at 11:58 PM.
  #6  
Old 01-14-2018, 12:04 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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I don't think you can go wrong with Casablanca. It's sort of a war movie, though it more punches the "Dramas about important issues" button for you. It has an amazing cast, and you'll be surprised at how many enduring catchphrases and ideas came out of it.
  #7  
Old 01-14-2018, 12:08 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
No Blade of Grass (1970)
THX 1138 (1971)
Silent Running (1972)
Solaris (1972)
Dark Star (1974)
Rollerball (1974)
Good films, though most of them do share the dark, dystopian view of the future that was common in sci-fi in the early 1970s, before Star Wars ate the sci-fi film category.
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Old 01-14-2018, 12:09 AM
Beckdawrek Beckdawrek is offline
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The Little Foxes, Bette Davis..great movie!!
  #9  
Old 01-14-2018, 12:19 AM
jasg jasg is offline
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Try the book Pictures at a Revolution. It covers these five movies from 1967 - nominated for Oscars in 1968.

Bonnie and Clyde
Doctor Doolittle
The Graduate
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
In the Heat of the Night

The following year, try 2001: A Space Odyssey

Another approach is to work your way through this list of the top 100.
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Old 01-14-2018, 12:21 AM
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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Spaghetti Westerns- I'm not opposed to Westerns in general, but if I'm going to watch one it needs to be more than Cowboys and Indians and gun duels.
So you'd probably enjoy Spaghetti Westerns. They were the post-"Cowboys and Indians" Westerns, the antidote to the stale formulaic Westerns that killed the genre, and they ushered in a grimmer, grittier, more realistic take on movies set in that time and place. Ironic, I suppose, because they got the name because they were directed by Italians with plots stolen from Japanese samurai movies and shot in southern Italy and Spain with a multilingual cast.

Metropolis is not a very good movie. The acting is over-the-top even by silent film standards, the plot is thin, and it ends by grabbing its message, rearing back, and beating you over the head with it. It's Great, but not Good, except in terms of the special effects, which hold up very well. Forbidden Planet is a much better seminal Science Fiction film, and The Day The Earth Stood Still did socially-conscious "message" Science Fiction much better. (Yes, I know you mentioned it as something you didn't like. My statement remains true.) As far as science fiction with good science, 2001: A Space Odyssey has good science except for the central conceits (the monoliths and all they do) and its message is very much subtext, not text. (I can't imagine anyone not having seen it, but it is from before your 1974 cutoff date, so... )

For old horror, it's hard to beat Nosferatu, the silent original, starring Max Schreck, who really did have a last name which translates to "Terror" in English. Speaking of, the Universal Dracula (1931) holds up well, but suffers from being the template all "traditional" vampire films were made in reference to, and therefore can never be as suspenseful as it was back then. Speaking of widely-copied templates, Night of the Living Dead (1968), the Romero original, is also still quite effective, and all the more so for being in black-and-white, which increases the sense of paranoiac dread.

Speaking of dread, I don't know if you've seen The Andromeda Strain, based on the Crichton novel, but it is definitely worth a watch.
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  #11  
Old 01-14-2018, 12:24 AM
Sefton Sefton is offline
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Stalag 17
Casablanca
The Third Man
The Manchurian Candidate (original)
On the Waterfront
  #12  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:01 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Good films, though most of them do share the dark, dystopian view of the future that was common in sci-fi in the early 1970s, before Star Wars ate the sci-fi film category.
I've said before that the golden age of science fiction movies ran from 1968 (with the release of 2001: A Space Odyssey) to 1977 (with the release of Star Wars). At least half of the worthwhile science fiction ever made were released in this ten year period.

2001 showed the science fiction was a legitimate film genre which could make movies with genuine ideas and deserved some respect. And Star Wars closed that door by turning the genre into sci-fi; mindless entertainment with big special effects budgets.
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Old 01-14-2018, 01:04 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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If you're looking for a great western, I'd recommend The Searchers (1956).
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Old 01-14-2018, 01:09 AM
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Out of the Past

Maybe the best film noire ever. It has gangsters but it has so much more.
  #15  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:24 AM
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What constitutes an "old movie" is subjective. I was born nine years before you and still find it difficult to call films made during the late 60s and 70s "old" even though they are now older than most the movies I watched on local TV stations while I was growing up. That said, I think the main criteria for whether a movie is "old" or not is if it was made before 1967. That year represents the end of the Production Code which had put a tight rein on American film content since 1934 and the beginning of the MPAA rating system we have now.

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Gangster films- Don't like the genre today, wouldn't appreciate it back then.
How do you feel about film noir? I could recommend a few like The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, or Touch of Evil but I don't know if you'd like movies of that type.

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Spaghetti Westerns- I'm not opposed to Westerns in general, but if I'm going to watch one it needs to be more than Cowboys and Indians and gun duels.
Spaghetti westerns were Italian homages and deconstructions of traditional American westerns. Of those, you can't go wrong with Sergio Leone's "Man with No Name" trilogy (A Fistful of Dollars, A Few Dollars More, and The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly) and Once Upon a Time in the West. As for American westerns made during the Code period, there's The Ox-Bow Incident which is about the tragic consequences of frontier-mob justice and Sam Peckinpah's Ride the High Country which is about two aging western lawmen having to face life in the 20th century.

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Action
The problem with most old action movies is current audiences often find them too slowly-paced. One you might like, however, Bad Day in Black Rock (1956), a latter-day Western starring Spencer Tracy and host of familiar faces. It also counts as drama about important issues (in this case, racism and unfair treatment of Japanese citizens during WWII).

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
War movies
Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory (1957) (part war movie and part courtroom drama) and Lewis Milestone's All Quiet on the Western Front(1930)

Quote:
Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Dramas about important issues
There was a period from the late 40s to the 60s when Hollywood put out a number of "message movies" meant to address controversial issues of the time. The problem with these films is that many of them haven't aged well and come across as preachy, heavy-handed, and naive. That said, Crossfire (1947) with Robert Mitchum still holds up (and also qualifies as a film noir) as does the classic To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).

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Originally Posted by adaher View Post
Political thrillers. Now that I think about it, I have seen Dr. Strangelove. Stuff like that is cool.
How about Cold War espionage films of the more realistic, non-James Bond variety? For that, you might like The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (1965) with Richard Burton.
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Last edited by NDP; 01-14-2018 at 01:25 AM.
  #16  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:55 AM
Wolf333 Wolf333 is offline
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If you're looking for a great western, I'd recommend The Searchers (1956).


This was going to be mine. It starts out as a traditional Western, but turns into something else.
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Old 01-14-2018, 05:45 AM
GreenWyvern GreenWyvern is offline
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Westerns...

Try True Grit (1969), with John Wayne as starring as a drunken, one-eyed, pot-bellied, has-been old marshal. He won an Oscar for the role.

Last edited by GreenWyvern; 01-14-2018 at 05:47 AM.
  #18  
Old 01-14-2018, 06:35 AM
Dignan Dignan is offline
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Some Like It Hot - a comedy with Marilyn Monroe, Jack Lemmon, and Tony Curtis. I think the comedy holds up today.

Singin' In The Rain - it's a classic Hollywood musical.

Something I take away from seeing the old movies is the opportunity to see what established today's standards. Gene Kelly was extremely talented. Marilyn Monroe was not just some blonde, she was a great comedic actress.

You could look at the list of past Academy Award winners for Best Picture. That narrows it down decades worth of work to what was considered the best (or one of the best) movies of each year. Not all of them will hold up, but you can compare how things changed from year to year.
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Old 01-14-2018, 07:30 AM
GreenWyvern GreenWyvern is offline
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Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975)

Weird, unsettling, suspense filled, highly memorable.

Trailer
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Old 01-14-2018, 07:45 AM
Athena Athena is online now
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Lawrence of Arabia - one of my all-time favorite movies. Great acting, great music, great story.

Gone with the Wind - worth a watch. Yes, it's sort of a romance, but it's a hell of a lot more as well.

(can't quite believe I'm the first to say those two!)

Last edited by Athena; 01-14-2018 at 07:46 AM.
  #21  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:11 AM
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Jimmy Stewart's Westerns are some of the best ever made in that genre.

They were among the first to focus more on character and the consequences of a violent life.

You have to see his Westerns
Winchester 73, Broken Arrow, Bend of the River, Naked Spur, Far Country, Man From Laramie, Destry Rides Again

His movies with Hitchcock are equally good
Rear Window, Vertigo

His comedies are superb
Philadelphia Story (with Hepburn and Cary Grant)
Harvey (based on the play that Stewart starred in)

Last edited by aceplace57; 01-14-2018 at 08:13 AM.
  #22  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:15 AM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Stagecoach. It holds up amazingly well. It's a Western, but much more of a commentary on society.

Sunset Bulevard. Just watched this last night on PBS. Very Hitchcockian, a little noirish. Very good.

My favorite Hitchcock film, though, is Notorious.

And if you've never seen Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, that is an absolute must.

Last edited by John Mace; 01-14-2018 at 08:15 AM.
  #23  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:27 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Quote:
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...How do you feel about film noir? I could recommend a few like The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, or Touch of Evil but I don't know if you'd like movies of that type...
I am going to second this suggestion, Double Indemnity in particular.

A masterpiece.


mmm
  #24  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:37 AM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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I am going to second this suggestion, Double Indemnity in particular.

A masterpiece.


mmm
It's too derivative of Body Heat.

Actually, I do like Body Heat better. But I'd recommend both.
  #25  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:45 AM
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Here is a list of "1,001 films you must see before you die." It's actually over 1,200 now because the list has been added to since 2000 when it was first drawn up.

Honestly, "must see" is a bit strong as it is mainly a list for someone who is really into cinema; I would put some in the category of "watch so you can analyze what went wrong." As a more casual fan, what you can use it for is to bring something to your attention you might never had heard of. They most likely all have an entry in Wikipedia (all the obscure ones I sampled did) so you can look it up to see if it is to your taste. The list is in time-order so you can start at 1974 and work your way backwards, clear back to 1902 if you have the stamina.
  #26  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:50 AM
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The Shootist
Treasure of the Sierra Madre
The Oxbow Incident
Stagecoach
(the original)

The Grapes of Wrath
Flight of The Phoenix
(again, the original)
Gone With the Wind

Freaks (horror, so shocking at the time that it couldn't be released in the original version)

Born Yesterday (comedy, with the hysterical Judy Holliday)

Angels With Dirty Faces (yeah, gangster film, but worth watching because of The Dead End Kids)
  #27  
Old 01-14-2018, 08:58 AM
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Action, war movies, political thrillers:

Beau Geste (both the silent version starring Ronald Coleman, and the sound version starring Gary Cooper)
The Prisoner of Zenda (the black-and-white version with Ronald Coleman is better than the color version with Stewart Granger, but both are good. [Both are based on the stage play adapted from the novel.])

Sergei Eisenstein's films:
Alexander Nevsky
Ivan the Terrible, Part 1
Ivan the Terrible, Part 2


Also, The Battleship Potemkin, just so you can tell the marxists that they are full of it.

Quote:
Romances- I don't mind modern romcoms but I just can't put up with an old style romance flick like Breakfast at Tiffany's.
Ninotchka is technically a romcom, but the comedy is mostly social and political.

Quote:
Non-Disney animation I might not know about.
Max Fleischer
Betty Boop
Popeye
Superman
Gulliver's Travels
Mr. Bug Goes to Town
  #28  
Old 01-14-2018, 09:00 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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You didn't say what you meant by old movie, so I just decided you meant anything up to 1974, the only year you mentioned in your post. I took my list of my 100 favorite movies and eliminated anything from 1975 on. This is what's left:

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, U.S., dir. Michael Curtiz)
All Quiet on the Western Front (1930, U.S., dir. Lewis Milestone)
Amarcord (1974, Italy, Federico Fellini)
Army of Shadows (1969, France/Italy, dir. Jean-Pierre Melville)
Camille (1937, U.S., dir. George Cukor)
Casablanca (1942, U.S., dir. Michael Curtiz)
Chinatown (1974, U.S., dir. Roman Polanski)
Citizen Kane (1941, U.S., dir. Orson Welles)
A Clockwork Orange (1971, U.K./U.S., dir. Stanley Kubrick)
Dark Star (1974, U.S., dir. John Carpenter)
Dr. Strangelove (1964, U.K., dir. Stanley Kubrick)
Duck Soup (1933, U.S., dir. Leo McCarey)
Fantastic Planet (1973, France, dir. Rene Laloux)
Forbidden Planet (1956, U.S., dir. Fred McLeod Wilcox)
Freaks (1932, U.S., dir. Tod Browning)
The Godfather (1972, U.S., dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
The Godfather Part II (1974, U.S., dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
The Great Dictator (1940, U.S., dir. Charles Chaplin)
Invaders from Mars (1953, U.S., dir. William Cameron Menzies)
It's a Wonderful Life (1946, U.S., dir. Frank Capra)
King Kong (1933, U.S., dir. Merian C. Cooper)
La Jetée (1962, France, dir. Chris Marker)
La Strada (1954, Italy, dir. Federico Fellini)
The Last Picture Show (1971, U.S., dir. Peter Bogdanovich)
M (1931, Germany, dir. Fritz Lang)
Macbeth (1971, U.K./U.S., dir. Roman Polanski)
The Maltese Falcon (1941, U.S., dir. John Huston)
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971, U.S., dir. Robert Altman)
Modern Times (1936, U.S., dir. Charles Chaplin)
Play it Again, Sam (1972, U.S., dir. Herbert Ross)
The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970, U.K./U.S., dir. Billy Wilder)
Psycho (1960, U.S., dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
Ride the High Country (1962, U.S., dir. Sam Peckinpah)
The Searchers (1956, U.S., dir. John Ford)
Seven Samurai (1954, Japan, dir. Akira Kurosawa)
Singin' in the Rain (1952, U.S., dir. Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen)
The Third Man (1949, U.K., dir. Carol Reed)
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948, U.S., dir. John Huston)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, U.K., dir. Stanley Kubrick)
Vertigo (1958, U.S., dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
The Wild Bunch (1969, U.S., dir. Sam Peckinpah)
The Wizard of Oz (1939, U.S., dir. Victor Fleming)
  #29  
Old 01-14-2018, 09:02 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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I'm ashamed to admit that I've never seen a Sean Connery Bond movie. Except for Never Say Never Again, which was 1983.
A pale imitation of Thunderball (1965). The 1983 movie owes its existence to a dispute over producer rights.

The best Bond movies are, IMHO, From Russia with Love and Goldfinger. Connery will always be the best Bond, but the series really started to go over the top after the latter. (Parachuting frogmen? A ninja army? Really? ) Of course, your mileage might vary.

Of the rest of the movies in the series, I'd especially recommend On Her Majesty's Secret Service (which is more or less faithful to the book) and For Your Eyes Only (actually a pretty good Cold War story).
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:06 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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You may not consider American Graffiti (1973) an "old" movie, but I do. By far George Lucas's best work (except maybe the original Star Wars), and one in which I get completely lost from the beginning.
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:07 AM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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The 1954 sci-fi/monster move, THEM! has a great cast, good script, great f/x (for the era) & a terrific director.

A personal favorite.

I also like the Abbot & Costello monster fllicks, & the Hope/Crosby Road pictures.

The Marx Brother are comedy gold, but ethic & racial references may offend some viewers.
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  #32  
Old 01-14-2018, 09:12 AM
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My favorite film is Beat The Devil with Bogart and Peter Lorre.
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Old 01-14-2018, 11:09 AM
Leo Krupe Leo Krupe is offline
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I was thinking of starting a similar type thread, only about the wonders of technology (because of Netflix in particular, I've been able to watch a lot of old movies now that I never had the opportunity to while growing up--in those days, if they didn't offer it at the local movie theater, or if it wasn't on TV, you didn't get to see it).

Now, my recommendations: Kurosawa. My daughter (who's a film buff, and is learning about old movies) and I just watched Seven Samurai a couple of days ago. We loved it. We've also watched Yojimbo and Rashomon.

We both like Bogart. The Maltese Falcon, Treasure of Sierra Madre, and Caine Mutiny are three classics. Also Key Largo.

Someone mentioned Jimmy Stewart. Watch Harvey.

Almost any Cary Grant film is worth watching.

For a good political thriller, watch Three Days of the Condor (Robert Redford). For a political thriller/comedy, watch Hopscotch (Walter Matthau)

Silent: Battleship Potemkin. Classic.

There are literally thousands of great old movies. You'll never be bored.
  #34  
Old 01-14-2018, 11:44 AM
Suburban Plankton Suburban Plankton is offline
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A few of my favorites that haven't been mentioned yet:

It Happened One Night - the original 'rom-com', with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert

Arsenic and Old Lace - screwball comedy at its best; Cary Grant, "Teddy Roosevelt", and the kindest, sweetest stone-cold killers you'll ever meet

The African Queen - Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn; adventure, comedy, romance, and leeches!
  #35  
Old 01-14-2018, 11:58 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Originally Posted by Leo Krupe View Post
For a political thriller/comedy, watch Hopscotch (Walter Matthau)
Maybe. I watched that movie back in the eighties and I remember it as being a great movie. So when it was recently released on a Criterion blu-ray, I sought it out to watch it again.

And I was disappointed. It had not held up well. Matthau is still good but the movie itself was pretty sloppy.
  #36  
Old 01-14-2018, 12:31 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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I'm fond of garish, Technicolor cheesy musicals, and also elegant black and white Fred and Ginger movies.

But some other oldies I like:

Shane (Western, with Alan Ladd. An ambiguous ending.)
Can't go wrong with Bette Davis, her first is Of Human Bondage with Leslie Howard, though it's slow and plodding you might not enjoy it, but Bette's scenes are electrifying. I like her in almost anything in the middle years, Mr. Skeffington, The Little Foxes, Deception...and later The Catered Affair (with Ernest Borgnine, it's a stretch, but a good attempt at a slice of life). And of course, All About Eve.
Pygmalion with Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller, hilarious, and it was remade as My Fair Lady.
Cary Grant can do no wrong, I am fond of Bringing Up Baby and Father Goose. Also To Catch a Thief, just the costumes alone are eye-popping.
Any cheesy or serious historical movie has my attention, Ben-Hur, The Ten Commandments, Caesar and Cleopatra, The Greatest Story Ever Told, and even old Steve Reeves movies, which are kind of unintentionally hilarious. A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield, Little Women (you might find it too syrupy and sentimental), National Velvet (a young Liz Taylor and Mickey Rooney, just magical).

Last edited by salinqmind; 01-14-2018 at 12:34 PM.
  #37  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:00 PM
Leo Krupe Leo Krupe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
Maybe. I watched that movie back in the eighties and I remember it as being a great movie. So when it was recently released on a Criterion blu-ray, I sought it out to watch it again.

And I was disappointed. It had not held up well. Matthau is still good but the movie itself was pretty sloppy.
I can't disagree that it's dated in a lot of ways, and the band when Kendig is at the bar has always been bad, but to me, there are so many great lines (from memory):

-By the way, my name's not Murdison.
Didn't think it was, Mr. Murdison

-You remind me of my father.
That's always been my problem

-Now I know what FBI stands for: Fucking Ball-busting Imbeciles!

-Someone is taking our picture.
Oh, that's Follett. He's an idiot. Probably no film in the camera

-Do please stop following me. You're making my dog very nervous. He detests the smell of stupidity.

-C You Next Tuesday Myerson?

-This is Eleanor Roosevelt!

And so on.

So yeah, it has its drawbacks, but I still love it.
  #38  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:09 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Some old war movies:

Spitfire

The Dam Busters

49th Parallel

13 Rue Madeleine

Cockleshell Heroes

Run Silent, Run Deep

Destination: Tokyo

Thirty Seconds over Tokyo

Objective: Burma

Orders to Kill

Decision before Dawn

Paths of Glory

The Guns of Navarone

The Great Escape

The Train

Von Ryan's Express


Some Cold War movies:

The Journey

A Dandy in Aspic

Fail-Safe

Topaz


Some other great dramas:

Town without Pity

Experiment in Terror

Anatomy of a Murder


Some science fiction:

The Day the Earth Stood Still

Destination: Moon

Forbidden Planet

Silent Running

Dark Star
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Last edited by terentii; 01-14-2018 at 01:10 PM.
  #39  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:19 PM
Ranchoth Ranchoth is offline
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Lessie...just skimming some big ones, off the top of my head:

Triumph of the Will
Alexander Nevsky
It Happened Here
Gojira
The Hidden Fortress

Maybe some examples of the Giallo genre
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
Marooned
Forbidden Planet
Jason and the Argonauts
Colossus: The Forbin Project
The Longest Day
Where Eagles Dare
Tora! Tora! Tora!


In terms on animation, specifically, you might try:

The Hunchbacked Horse
Momotaro's Divine Sea Warriors
(The first full-length anime movie...released in 1945.)
Fritz the Cat
The Lorax (1972)
The Point
  #40  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:38 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Fritz Lang's M

The Dawn Patrol
(1930 or 1938)

Robinson Crusoe on Mars

The Time Machine
(1960)

The OdeSSa File

The Day of the Jackal
(1971)

The Producers (1968)

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World

The Great Race

Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines
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Last edited by terentii; 01-14-2018 at 01:41 PM.
  #41  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:40 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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Probably a vintage film newbie's biggest challenge will be learning the names and faces

Much like today, you instantly recognize Matt Damon, Chris Hemsworth, and Hugh Jackmon.

You have to get equally familiar with the actors in older films. Learn the characters that they typically played. It adds to the enjoyment of the movie.

There's perhaps a dozen actors you'll see repeatedly in older films and they always play very similar characters. The faces & names change from decade to decade.

Last edited by aceplace57; 01-14-2018 at 01:43 PM.
  #42  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:44 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Anything by Laurel and Hardy, especially

Helpmates

Going Bye-Bye

Below Zero

Perfect Day

Towed in a Hole

Come Clean

Be Big

The Midnight Patrol

Blockheads

Sons of the Desert

Brats

The Music Box

Blotto

Them Thar Hills

Tit for Tat
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Last edited by terentii; 01-14-2018 at 01:47 PM.
  #43  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:04 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Krupe View Post
You remind me of my father.
That's always been my problem
The inside joke is that the actress is Matthau's daughter Lucy.
  #44  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:11 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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In addition to the other classic horror movies mentioned above, try The Island of Lost Souls (1933), as much for Charles Laughton’s delightfully over-the-top performance as crazy old Dr. Moreau as for the monster stuff. This flick was banned in Great Britain until the 1970s on the basis of being “excessively horrifying.”

My favorite war movie is The Train (1964), starring Burt Lancaster as a French Resistance fighter and Paul Scofield as a Nazi colonel with a soft spot for “degenerate” art, who’s trying to steal France’s greatest 19th-20th century paintings for Der Vaterland at the end of WWII. A very different sort of war film, asking who Art really belongs to, and whether ordinary people are more important than great art.

And I’d like to speak up for the Brits, because movie nuts so rarely do: The 1930s-50s films of The Archers (Michael Powell and Emil Pressburger) are uniformly excellent, but vary widely in theme: The Red Shoes; Black Narcissus; The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp; 42nd Parallel; A Matter of Life and Death.

Also the Ealing Studios comedies, anything with Alec Guinness in it: Kind Hearts and Coronets; The Lavender Hill Mob; The Man in the White Suit; The Ladykillers.
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  #45  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:22 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
The Marx Brother are comedy gold, but ethic & racial references may offend some viewers.
You can say that again. Sometimes those boys didn’t seem to have any ethics at all.

Seriously, though, they are must-sees. I would skip the later MGM releases (everybody loved the first two in the mid-30s, but they seem kinda mild today). Stick with the anarchic Paramount catalogue, especially Monkey Business; Horse Feathers; Duck Soup.. (The first two, The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers, are great if you like watching Broadway stage plays that somebody aimed a camera at; the latter three are pure Hollywood product.)
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  #46  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:37 PM
outlierrn outlierrn is offline
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Whatever happened to baby Jane

Hud

An occurrence at owl creek bridge
(Not a movie, but well worth seeing, Netflix has it in the original twilight zone episodes)

Night of the living dead.


Cool hand Luke
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  #47  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:41 PM
Dropo Dropo is offline
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War
Attack (1956)

Horror
Night of the Demon (1957)
Onibaba (1964)

Disaster
Deluge (1933)
San Francisco (1936)

Random & Worthwhile
Detour (1946)
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
Kiss Me Deadly (1955)
The Big Combo (1955)
Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
Touch of Evil (1958)
Creation of the Humanoids (1962)
Seconds (1966)
  #48  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:46 PM
DinoR DinoR is offline
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Using the pre-1974 cutoff and what seems to be your dispositions, things that haven't yet been mentioned:
- Spartacus
- Zulu
- Kelley's Heroes
- From Here to Eternity- It's not a clean single genre fit. It shows the Japanese attack on Schofield Barracks but it's not a war film. It's mostly a pre-WWII military drama but with two love stories as part of it. It's even got some musical numbers although it's not a musical. It also won 8 Oscars including Best Picture and Best Director.

If we relax the year standard to 1977 for a movie most haven't seen - Cross of Iron. It's Peckinpah's only war film. It's not his best film. Using real military equipment for most of the scenes he produces some of the best armor scenes in the history of cinema. It's also kind of sloppy and overly slow in other parts. There's plenty of discomfort to go around outside the trademark slow motion vilence - rape, violent retribution for the rape, death of a Russian child soldier, and a careerist officer blackmailing a homesexual subordinate with threat of taking official notice. That's before we consider that the protagonists are WWII Germans. It can be both riveting and hard to watch. It's not for everyone. It's different enough from the mainstream war film it at least considers consideration.
  #49  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:46 PM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
I don't think you can go wrong with Casablanca. It's sort of a war movie, though it more punches the "Dramas about important issues" button for you. It has an amazing cast, and you'll be surprised at how many enduring catchphrases and ideas came out of it.
For some reason, this is the first movie I thought of when reading the OP.
  #50  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:52 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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I'm going to suggest skipping Metropolis, Casablanca and Charlie Chaplin films.

Watch The Heroes of Telemark.
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