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Old 03-11-2018, 12:50 PM
Mangosteen Mangosteen is offline
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People destroying their above grounds pools after summer?

Seen several videos of people purposely destroying (and I don't mean just draining) their large above grounds pools after (I assume) the warm summer season is over.

Are these pools so inexpensive that people just replace them the next year? Are these pools "collapsible" so they can be stored away if one has the space?
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:06 PM
Lightlystarched Lightlystarched is offline
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Getting them fully dried off and folded compactly enough for storage is impossible. They'll just grow mold in all the crevasses. They are cheap enough that most people consider them disposable. Sickeningly wasteful, yes, but that seems par for the course anymore.
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:09 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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Nah.
They were feeding you a line, about how rich they are.
Unless--a tax thing?
Maybe?
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Mangosteen View Post
Seen several videos of people purposely destroying (and I don't mean just draining) their large above grounds pools after (I assume) the warm summer season is over.
Do those videos include any indication that the owners are intending to have another pool the following summer?

Generally speaking, above-the-ground pools are *not* inexpensive, and maintenance on any pool is often a big thing (and the hardware on an above-the-ground pool will wear out over time). It may well be that these people had the pool for several years, got tired of it, and decided to be done with having a pool (my parents did that). Alternately, they may have had that pool for several years, realized that it needed a lot of repairs (or was just worn out), and decided to scrap that one, in favor of getting a new one the following year.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 03-11-2018 at 01:10 PM.
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:19 PM
Lightlystarched Lightlystarched is offline
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Above ground pools here are usually the $300-400 kind from Walmart that are just a big plastic bag. Some have hard sides, but lots are just held up by the design of the plastic- just like a wide squat vase shape. These don't have filters or anything fancy.
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Old 03-11-2018, 02:28 PM
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In the last 10 or 15 years, three families I know have permanently ditched their above-ground pools. Reasons they cited include the time, effort, and expense of maintenance; high homeowners' insurance premiums; and the availability of municipal pools and pools at private gyms that they already belonged to.

I don't know any family that has erected a new or replacement above-ground pool in the same period.
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Old 03-11-2018, 03:25 PM
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Above ground pools here are usually the $300-400 kind from Walmart that are just a big plastic bag. Some have hard sides, but lots are just held up by the design of the plastic- just like a wide squat vase shape. These don't have filters or anything fancy.
I didn't even know that these were a thing.
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Old 03-11-2018, 03:39 PM
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Nah.
They were feeding you a line, about how rich they are.
Unless--a tax thing?
Maybe?
What possible tax thing could involve destroying an above ground pool?
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Old 03-11-2018, 03:52 PM
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I didn't even know that these were a thing.
This page has some even cheaper.
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:02 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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What possible tax thing could involve destroying an above ground pool?
In some areas, it would presumably lower the assessed value of your home and therefore reduce your property tax.
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:09 PM
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I have a 15 foot diameter above ground pool I have used for two summers, and plan to use this summer as well if it is still in good shape. I disassemble it in the fall and store it in the basement. It has an electric skimmer/filter. I think I paid about $250 for it.

Last edited by Fear Itself; 03-11-2018 at 04:10 PM.
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:17 PM
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In some areas, it would presumably lower the assessed value of your home and therefore reduce your property tax.
An above ground pool? No way. It’s not something constructed and part of the property. It’s effectively outdoor furniture. Not to mention they are very inexpensive.

Last edited by hajario; 03-11-2018 at 04:17 PM.
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:31 PM
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A friend of mine destroyed his *below* ground pool a few years back. But this is Seattle, so a pool that can't be used for most months yet still needs lots of maintenance is not desirable. He essentially made the call that the presence of the pool was *hurting* the market value of the house when they bought it more than the cost of removing it, which they promptly did after buying the house.
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Old 03-11-2018, 04:56 PM
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In some areas, it would presumably lower the assessed value of your home and therefore reduce your property tax.
That's definitely true with in-ground pools in the upper Midwest, where I live. Very few people have them, and while they were quite a fad for a while, a huge percentage of the people who got them ended up filling them in when the ROI wasn't quite what they expected.

As for the "giant plastic bag" pools, they're simply a larger, heavier version of the blow-up pools so many of us had when we were kids.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 03-11-2018 at 04:57 PM.
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Old 03-11-2018, 05:04 PM
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Yeah, my guess is that they're the "Giant bag" types. We had one for a year (bought it on clearance) and it did its job although it got a hole in the liner during breakdown and I never felt inclined to patch it up or replace it. they probably are cheap enough to be considered "disposable" if you consider $300/yr a good summer investment. It was the kind with a metal pipe frame that the liner hung in but didn't have solid sides (sort of like this).

As mentioned, permanently installed pools are a bit of a white elephant and can drive buyers away from your property with fears of maintenance costs, cleaning, chemicals and potential liability and fencing concerns.

Last edited by Jophiel; 03-11-2018 at 05:08 PM.
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Old 03-11-2018, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
I didn't even know that these were a thing.
This page has some even cheaper.
My brother has one of those, the type in which the upper rim of the pool is an inflatable tube, while the sidewalls and bottom are heavy plastic. As you fill the pool, the inflatable rim rises and the water presses evenly on the sidewalls to make it rigid. I think it's a clever design.

The one my brother currently has is his second. Rats got at the first one while it was in storage. I assume that before the pool is put away for storage, you have to dry it out thoroughly to prevent mold, and that's gotta be a pain in the ass. So I can well understand treating this $150 pool as disposable.
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Old 03-11-2018, 06:54 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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it's common for people to get rid of above ground pools once their youngest kid reaches the age when they no longer use it . That is probably around junior high, 12-14.
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Old 03-11-2018, 07:12 PM
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A friend of mine destroyed his *below* ground pool a few years back. But this is Seattle, so a pool that can't be used for most months yet still needs lots of maintenance is not desirable. He essentially made the call that the presence of the pool was *hurting* the market value of the house when they bought it more than the cost of removing it, which they promptly did after buying the house.
We recently filled our diving pool in.
Should have done it a decade ago.
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Old 03-11-2018, 07:18 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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I am guessing that a lot of HOAs don't permit above ground pools except the small temporary ones.
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Old 03-11-2018, 07:55 PM
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I know HOAs that don't allow pools, swing sets or trampolines. We live on well water so any kind of water toys were out of the question for my kids. We joined a racket club where they had a nice pool and tennis courts. Kids enjoyed it. There is a fancy shmantzy country club with 18 hole golf course and 2 pools and I don't know what else. We ain't exactly the C.C. type, though.
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Old 03-11-2018, 08:06 PM
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Having a trampoline can lead to the voiding of homeowner's insurance. They're that big of a risk.
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Old 03-11-2018, 09:41 PM
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An above ground pool? No way. Itís not something constructed and part of the property. Itís effectively outdoor furniture. Not to mention they are very inexpensive.
Define above ground pool?
A Walmart / Intex type pool no.
A real above ground pool?

Not cheap, you can spend over $10,000 on the pool pump liner decking plumbing ladders etc.

By the time you prep and level the ground, erect the framing and wall, fill with sand, grade and compact, get the liner in it, then put how ever much water and 18' X 40' X 52" container holds, run the electric and plumbing, put in the desking etc, that's no longer outdoor furniture and you arent moving it around, you need a permit to even put it in, in most places i know of.


https://www.thepoolfactory.com/intre...3x54-oval.html

over $7,000
pump and plumbing not included, installation not included, electrical and wiring not included, decking not included etc etc
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Old 03-11-2018, 11:16 PM
Chisquirrel Chisquirrel is online now
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Define above ground pool?
A Walmart / Intex type pool no.
A real above ground pool?

Not cheap, you can spend over $10,000 on the pool pump liner decking plumbing ladders etc.

By the time you prep and level the ground, erect the framing and wall, fill with sand, grade and compact, get the liner in it, then put how ever much water and 18' X 40' X 52" container holds, run the electric and plumbing, put in the desking etc, that's no longer outdoor furniture and you arent moving it around, you need a permit to even put it in, in most places i know of.


https://www.thepoolfactory.com/intre...3x54-oval.html

over $7,000
pump and plumbing not included, installation not included, electrical and wiring not included, decking not included etc etc
That's not a pool, that's a POOL. It's roughly four times the size of a common backyard above ground pool - about the point where you dig a hole and put your pool below ground.
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Old 03-11-2018, 11:56 PM
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The way they build mcmansions around here, 18'x40' feet is effectively the entire backyard. With the tall wooden fences they put in, you would have to draw breath to get around it. My friend who had six acres and room for one of those still went with the traditional 18' circular pool. Because that was plenty for his family.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:42 AM
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I didn't even know that these were a thing.
Really? I find this incredible. I wouldn't say they are abundant, but I see quite a few as I drive around. And I definitely see them advertised regularly. While some may consider them to be an eye-sore, I'm more of a live-and-let-live kind of person. If new technology and products allow less affluent people to have a way to cool off in the backyard, why should I care?

But the OP mentions "large" above-ground pools, so I don't think he's talking about the cheap inflatable ones. I also see videos of "regular" above-ground pools being demolished, with the water flooding out. As other guess, I'm sure these are people who no longer want a pool rather than ones who think of them as disposable.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:51 AM
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Really? I find this incredible. I wouldn't say they are abundant, but I see quite a few as I drive around.
Well, all I can say is that I've never owned a pool (or looked into buying a pool), I don't swim, and if anyone in my neighborhood (which features narrow yards, and nearly everyone has a fence) has something like this, it's in their backyard, which would be difficult to see from the street.
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Old 03-12-2018, 10:14 AM
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Well, all I can say is that I've never owned a pool (or looked into buying a pool), I don't swim, and if anyone in my neighborhood (which features narrow yards, and nearly everyone has a fence) has something like this, it's in their backyard, which would be difficult to see from the street.
That makes sense. I live in a rural area, where large yards are common, and it's pretty easy to see the back yards from the roads and streets.
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Old 03-12-2018, 10:38 AM
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Getting them fully dried off and folded compactly enough for storage is impossible. They'll just grow mold in all the crevasses. They are cheap enough that most people consider them disposable. Sickeningly wasteful, yes, but that seems par for the course anymore.
Not true.

When I was a kid, we took down our pool at the end of every summer, dried the liner, and stored it all away for the next year.

We never had a problem with mildew. And the pool lasted a lot longer than the neighbors' pools that stayed up all winter.
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Old 03-12-2018, 10:56 AM
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Not true.

When I was a kid, we took down our pool at the end of every summer, dried the liner, and stored it all away for the next year.

We never had a problem with mildew. And the pool lasted a lot longer than the neighbors' pools that stayed up all winter.
This surprises me. There are a lot of above-ground pools near me, and I don't see anyone emptying them and taking them down for the winter. Everybody seems to lower the water level below the skimmer and cover them up for the winter. The cost of refilling is likely one reason. Nobody wants to refill a pool if they have a well, and the cost to have a water hauler do it is probably $200 to $300, plus you have to add all of the chemicals to re-balance the water.

I have an in-ground pool with a vinyl liner, so emptying it isn't an option. But I wouldn't want to if I had a similar size above-ground, either, as it cost me $450 to fill it when I had it replaced several years ago. I open it with less than $40 worth of chemicals.

Last edited by Orwell; 03-12-2018 at 10:56 AM.
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Old 03-12-2018, 02:15 PM
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Two houses ago, my neighbor got tired of messing with his in-ground (I almost typed "in-grown") pool. Fortunately, his next-door neighbor wanted one. So, he took out his pool, and the contractor digging his neighbor's pool put all the dirt in the empty hole. He sold all his pool gear to the new pool owner, and everybody was happy.
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Old 03-12-2018, 03:19 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Well, all I can say is that I've never owned a pool (or looked into buying a pool), I don't swim, and if anyone in my neighborhood (which features narrow yards, and nearly everyone has a fence) has something like this, it's in their backyard, which would be difficult to see from the street.
FWIW, I too was completely unaware of these, too. All the people I know or knew with above ground pools and all the ones Iíve seen in my neighborhood have been of the permanent type with filters and all that.
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Old 03-12-2018, 05:38 PM
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Define above ground pool?
A Walmart / Intex type pool no.
A real above ground pool?

Not cheap, you can spend over $10,000 on the pool pump liner decking plumbing ladders etc.

By the time you prep and level the ground, erect the framing and wall, fill with sand, grade and compact, get the liner in it, then put how ever much water and 18' X 40' X 52" container holds, run the electric and plumbing, put in the desking etc, that's no longer outdoor furniture and you arent moving it around, you need a permit to even put it in, in most places i know of.


https://www.thepoolfactory.com/intre...3x54-oval.html

over $7,000
pump and plumbing not included, installation not included, electrical and wiring not included, decking not included etc etc
Oooh. So a tax savings of maybe $80/year.
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Old 03-12-2018, 07:36 PM
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A friend of mine destroyed his *below* ground pool a few years back. But this is Seattle, so a pool that can't be used for most months yet still needs lots of maintenance is not desirable. He essentially made the call that the presence of the pool was *hurting* the market value of the house when they bought it more than the cost of removing it, which they promptly did after buying the house.
[Hijack]Interesting. A couple years back I bought a house with a pool in Seattle. I was leery , fearing the maintenance. But then I figured, what the hell, it'll be an adventure. Thing is, it's. easy. You just dip a test strip in there every once in a while. When something looks to be moving out of whack, you throw in a few chemicals. I suppose I could be more scientificical about it, but why? As long as the parameters are in spec, why stress? Winter time it cools off to the point that most chemical reactions stop. So you don't really have to do much of anything. It's an added expense, sure, but I gave up helicopter skiing and Furby collecting, so I'm coming out ahead.[/hijack (apologies)]
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Old 03-13-2018, 04:04 PM
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I think the people you hear about trashing the pools are probably dumb kids and the pools are the lower priced ones. They want to get on the youtube doing something edgy.

I had an 18-footer for many years, took it down ever fall and put it back up every summer. Mold don't grow in Nevada. Then the wife brings home a 26-footer ($1000!) and it all went to shit.

Above ground pool ownership has given me PTSD.
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Old 03-13-2018, 07:52 PM
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Local news. Always illuminating at just the right moment.

http://komonews.com/news/local/woman...und-pool-burst
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Old 03-18-2018, 06:38 PM
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FWIW, I too was completely unaware of these, too. All the people I know or knew with above ground pools and all the ones Iíve seen in my neighborhood have been of the permanent type with filters and all that.
Even the larger "inflatable" * ones have a filter. The deeper ones also have a frame.These pools usually get taken down every year in areas with cold winters and I can see people destroying one if they knew they were getting rid of it anyway. They aren't quite disposable, but getting rid of an under $1000 pool happens fairly often. Maybe the people have decided not to have a pool next year, or they want a deeper one, or maybe this one needs too many repairs. I can see people making a video of themselves destroying a pool that they were getting rid of anyway.




* The whole pool doesn't inflate like some 12 inch deep kiddie pools. You inflate the top ring and as you fill the pool with water , the walls go up.
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