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Old 04-23-2018, 03:57 AM
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Cashiers openly shorting their register (attention accounting types)

I've noticed over the years many, many cashiers in stores shorting their register rather than giving out a large amount of coins.

For example, a customer buys a candy bar. With sales tax the total is $1.05. Customer hands cashier two dollars but then the cashier hands back one of the dollars. BUT, the cashier rings in that $1.05 had actually been paid.

I've noticed this a lot and it's happened to me a lot. Especially at convenience marts that sell smaller items like soda and chips and such.

I understand not wanting to hand out a large amount of coins several times during the day, and that was the purpose of the "take a penny/leave a penny" dish. But doing it this way several times a day must make the register tally meaningless.

I own a store, albeit we don't sell small items like candy. But at the end of a cashiers shift there is a log of how much should be in that register. If it's short by even a small amount we go through and try to find out whats up.

If those convenience stores are doing this to the tune of say a dollar per hour that could end up being thousands of dollars per year. How on Earth do the managers or owners have any accurate records of their sales and income and such?

I don't see the cashiers keeping any kind of log of how much they shorted the register just to avoid handing out change.
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Old 04-23-2018, 05:13 AM
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Maybe the store decided that dealing with all that small change wasn't worth the time and effort and decided to round sums down as a matter of policy?
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Old 04-23-2018, 05:50 AM
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It's not unusual for privately owned places not to care, it's often an owner or family member shorting the business.

Corporate businesses tend to be more concerned. In my experience they set a threshold any variance above or below the threshold results in a write up. Two or three strikes and you are fired. If a cashier stays within the threshold it's barely even investigated unless is a constant thing. If the cashier wants to take advantage of that to be lazy or in some cases help their metrics(cashiers are also measured on speed of transactions), they can do so but they are risking a lot if they misjudge their accuracy. Lowest I've heard of was $0.05 at Toys-R-US. Variances of $2-5 a shift are a bit more reasonable and result in less turn over, which is also expensive to the business.
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:33 AM
doreen doreen is online now
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I think you are overestimating how frequently it occurs. I'm sure it doesn't happen several times an hour, for a variety of reasons. First, it would only happen for certain values - just because the cashier does it for a total of $1.05 doesn't mean it happens if the total is $1.25 and it certainly won't happen if the total is $1.95. Second, it wouldn't happen if the customer didn't tender $2. If instead, the customer handed the cashier $1.25, the cashier wouldn't short the register. It's not all that common for someone to give the cashier $2 for a $1.05 total, unless they have a specific reason for needing coins, such as to feed a parking meter. Most people who carry cash end up with a few coins and would dig out a nickel or a quarter to avoid getting 95 cents in coins.

It generally happens at certain types of stores- it happens at independent convenience stores and 7-11 type franchised stores ( where all the employees may be a part of the family that owns the place) but not at corporate owned stores, like CVS or Target . It may well be that the owner prefers losing a dollar or two a day rather than paying for more change from the bank
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by doreen View Post
It may well be that the owner prefers losing a dollar or two a day rather than paying for more change from the bank
It isn't just the losing of the money I'm questioning, it's the inaccuracy of the till. Their ledgers have to be a darned mess. For inventory, sales tax collection, and other records and taxes, accuracy matters. Even if the store owner is willing to take a slight hit, the state isn't. Now the income of the business goes down because sales tax proceeds are being paid with store money, not the actual tax collection. Thus a double hit to the stores income. My accountant and my business partner would shit if I allowed that on a routine basis and my till receipts were basically not a true representation of cash taken in.

And I disagree with you on the frequency. I see it happen all the time. And those tiny nickels and dimes over time will add up.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:03 AM
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Many years ago I worked at a home improvement store, where in an 8 hour shift I could sell $8-10K easily. We were allowed a .07c off till when cashing out. Even if we were less than that off, we would have to count the till at least once again. I remember being off a dollar once, ended up being there over an hour (unpaid) recounting until it found.

I also worked at a mini-mart who was pretty casual with the tills, like the OP. The owner was fine with missing a nickel here, a few pennies there. When we cashed out, we'd note how much we were short and he'd toss in the difference, if it was pretty minimal (like under $2). It kept goodwill with the customers, in his mind. And by tossing in the difference, it didn't mess with his books.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
I've noticed over the years many, many cashiers in stores shorting their register rather than giving out a large amount of coins.
You left out an important detail, where you live. That might have something to do with it. I live in Chicagoland which, I have to believe, is pretty much like every other major urban area in the United States. In my experience, at least, retailers just don't do that kind of stuff. Some do have a "penny cup" with some pennies in it. If you have a bill for $3.02, you can take two pennies out of the cup so that you don't get a shitload of change back. Conversely, if something is $3.87, you can drop the three pennies in the cup so that others can access them if need be.

For the most part, the large majority of transactions, even small ones, are via credit. I even have a Dunkin Donuts card and the phone app. I never use money for even a $3.00 purchase. In fact, I charge most everything as do a lot of people.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:26 AM
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It isn't just the losing of the money I'm questioning, it's the inaccuracy of the till. Their ledgers have to be a darned mess.
I haven't worked a till in a quarter century--but when I did, there was a small (like $2.50) bonus for getting your till within $.05 of the expected total by the end of the shift. Being off by a couple of dollars in either direction wasn't a big deal, as long as foul play wasn't suspected. Someone (not the cashier) would balance the tills at the end of the shift, and if they were off, record the difference.

I don't see why this would result in a big mess.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:30 AM
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We were allowed a .07c off till when cashing out.
.07c? Is that seven hundredths of a cent?
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:50 AM
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There are some provinces in Canada where the employer is not allowed to deduct till shortages from the employee (Similarly, are not allowed to charge an employee money for a uniform). All you can do is decide whether to get rid of an employee based on chronic (serious) shortages. The little I've heard of cash management, shortages of less than $20 in several thousand (in small cash transactions) in a rushed environment are generally part of doing business. (Plus Canada today does not use the penny, so 2 cents rounds down, 3 or 4 cents rounds up to a nickel. Nobody's going to be spot on.)

Also note that some banks (all banks?) have a charge for handling coin in deposits... (Even if rolled, I think) plus a charge for providing rolls of coin. There's a reason why credit/debit is usually preferred by merchants even with the banks' excessive service charges.

I recall reading that when on of the local Toronto department stores first started doing business, a decent amount of their profits was from insisting on exact amounts. If a sale was $2.05 small mom-and-pop stores in the late 1800's would say "let's make it two dollars even". Timothy insisted on $2.05 and that added up. Of course nowadays with transactions well above $20 that difference would be a far smaller proportion of total sales.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:06 AM
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Store cashier here. Many people will say "keep the pennies" from their change, so I keep a mental amount and if it's three cents and an order comes to $1.06, I'll accept a dollar. My store allows the cashier a 1% margin of error either way (over or under), and any overage is put in the safe, where it can be used to cover an underage.

Don't sweat the small stuff.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
It isn't just the losing of the money I'm questioning, it's the inaccuracy of the till. Their ledgers have to be a darned mess. For inventory, sales tax collection, and other records and taxes, accuracy matters. Even if the store owner is willing to take a slight hit, the state isn't. Now the income of the business goes down because sales tax proceeds are being paid with store money, not the actual tax collection. Thus a double hit to the stores income. My accountant and my business partner would shit if I allowed that on a routine basis and my till receipts were basically not a true representation of cash taken in.


But you're assuming that all store owners are as interested in accuracy as you are- and they simply aren't. I know a few stores that don't even have cash registers (they add up your purchases on an adding machine) and even more where not every sale is run through the cash register for various reasons that run from a customer throwing exact change on the counter for a single item all the way to stores where I have been told "cash no tax". Not to mention the people who don't bother taking their change if it's less than a quarter , or the fact that the accountant doesn't care if a business owner throws a few dollars into the till each week to make it balance out.


And you seeing it frequently doesn't in itself mean it happens several times an hour - but even if it happens 5 times an hour for a 12 hour day, that's still only $3.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:45 AM
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It's trivial to do an adjusting entry at the end of the day and square up the books. If the register says there should be $327.58 in the till and there is only $327.43, you record in your books the full $327.58 in sales and a separate entry for "Cash Short" equal to $0.15. This is cheaper than paying people to recount the drawers a dozen times to find the fifteen cents.

Since cash short is an expense, it helps to reduce income taxes. The seller is responsible for the sales tax on the whole amount, so he is out maybe an extra 1.5 cents in sales tax too. Big whoop.

When I was a cashier, well over 90% of the time I'd be spot on to the penny. Being off by a dollar was incredibly rare. I remember one day when I was off by a lot (perhaps $20) but I don't remember if I figured out the problem with a recount or if I was truly short.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:48 AM
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I was a terrible cashier but I did this a lot, some days I would make notes of how much the register was shorted, other days I would just try to keep track in my head. When I counted out I'd just square up from my own pocket, it was worth the dollar or whatever not to have to deal with the BS. When my manager finally figured out why my register was always spot on, I got pulled off the register for good. Oh well.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:58 AM
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.07c? Is that seven hundredths of a cent?
Nope, it's 7% of the speed of light (or about 13,000 MPH).
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:18 AM
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If I owned a store I would be more worried about employees ringing up a no sale and just pocketing the entire amount. A business owner just doesn't have time to be worried about a couple of cents here and there.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:35 AM
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Nope, it's 7% of the speed of light (or about 13,000 MPH).
Nice try, but you're off by a factor of 3600.
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Old 04-23-2018, 12:10 PM
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I don't see the cashiers keeping any kind of log of how much they shorted the register just to avoid handing out change.
Wouldn't they figure that out at the end of the night when they count out the drawer? At least that's how we always did it. At the end of the night, when I was closing out the till, I'd total up the cash register, and then count the money in the till (and add it to the money that's been deposited into the safe throughout the day.) So we'd end up with two numbers. And almost never those two numbers did match. Generally, we tried to keep them within a buck or so. But we'd always know how much money we had and how much we were supposed to have. (ETA: And I assume they keep track of this in some cash over/short line in their accounting ledger.)

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Old 04-23-2018, 04:01 PM
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I could see owners of the convenience stores not caring about collecting the exact amount of the ticketed price and having a built in buffer on the prices to offset it.
If they are satisfied making a 20% margin on what they sell they'll price everything at a 22% markup to cover it.
It's not going to "mess up" any tax records since they'll still be paying taxes on the exact price they rang it up for + sales tax. The records are correct. It may hurt them since they are paying taxes on money they didn't collect but if they built in that extra margin buffer they may not care.
Same with inventory control. There's nothing to mess up. Customer took 2 bags of chips, the register deducted 2 bags of chips, 2 bags of chips down from inventory.
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Old 04-23-2018, 05:46 PM
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You left out an important detail, where you live. That might have something to do with it. I live in Chicagoland which, I have to believe, is pretty much like every other major urban area in the United States. In my experience, at least, retailers just don't do that kind of stuff.
Milwaukee.

And for the most part it's not happening often at the large corporate places like speedway or Kwik Trip.

But one place I see it a lot is at an independently owned 24 hour convenience mart near the freeway entrance. And they are easily bumping back to the tune of $1 an hour, every hour. I've been in there a zillion times over the years at all times of day and night. They do decent business.

And they are easily bumping back to the tune of $1 an hour, every hour, or every day. That's over 8 grand a year, minimum, that the register said it had that it didn't. Register tallies do get recorded and are part of ones documentation during tax time.

My only theory is that this place has cooked books anyway. But I see it happen at many other places as well.
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
It isn't just the losing of the money I'm questioning, it's the inaccuracy of the till. Their ledgers have to be a darned mess. For inventory, sales tax collection, and other records and taxes, accuracy matters. Even if the store owner is willing to take a slight hit, the state isn't. Now the income of the business goes down because sales tax proceeds are being paid with store money, not the actual tax collection. Thus a double hit to the stores income. My accountant and my business partner would shit if I allowed that on a routine basis and my till receipts were basically not a true representation of cash taken in.

And I disagree with you on the frequency. I see it happen all the time. And those tiny nickels and dimes over time will add up.
I run a small store, I also to the book keeping. The ledgers are fine. The reason is that you have two numbers at the end of the day. The actual amount of money you brought in and the number the register spits out. Yes, they don't match, however (assuming were talking about small discrepancies, not stealing), the only important number is how much money you have.
Sure, the register may say $965.38 for the daily total, but if all I have is $963.27, that's how much goes to the bank, gets reported for tax purposes, can be used to pay bills etc.
In that case, at my store, I'd put down $963.27 for the daily total and I make a little note that says -$2.11. Every single page of books that we have, since this business started nearly 40 years ago, has a little that over/under amount.
A few cents, even a few dollars isn't a big deal. But I use that number to track patterns. Between the cash, the credit cards (esp w/ the CC machine not linked to the register), general mistakes or lack of knowledge on how things should happen, handing out a little more or taking a little less to round up/down, it's part of business.

And, before anyone says it, the way my store is setup isn't conducive to having each employee run their own register or have their own till.

As for the frequency, unless it's policy in that store or someone has taken it upon themselves to do that, I don't think it happens all that often. Sure, once in a while I'll hear a cashier round up a penny or two, but not all that often. Also, it tends to balance out due to enough people saying "just keep the penny" or the cashier bringing it back to zero from our little take a penny/leave a penny jar.
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:36 PM
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And, before anyone says it, the way my store is setup isn't conducive to having each employee run their own register or have their own till.

As for the frequency, unless it's policy in that store or someone has taken it upon themselves to do that, I don't think it happens all that often. Sure, once in a while I'll hear a cashier round up a penny or two, but not all that often. Also, it tends to balance out due to enough people saying "just keep the penny" or the cashier bringing it back to zero from our little take a penny/leave a penny jar.
ditto here small computer shop owner.

its hardly worth stealing a dollar or two, so if the cash box is a couple dollars one way or the other I make note and kinda keep a running tally of who was on that day. Patterns occasionally emerge.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:01 PM
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Sure, the register may say $965.38 for the daily total, but if all I have is $963.27, that's how much goes to the bank, gets reported for tax purposes, can be used to pay bills etc.
But you're talking about $2 lousy dollars for an entire day. It seems to me that these stores I'm talking about are behind at least 12 times that every single day.

I own a gun store. Our purchases are routinely in the hundreds and even thousands of dollars, sometimes in cash for high amounts. If our register was short the same percentage that the convenience stores is we'd put an end to it. There shouldn't be shortages at all, and especially on a daily basis, and especially intentional.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:20 PM
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Nothing really to add except the discussion brought to mind a guy I knew in while we were teens in the 80s who was something of a klepto, and while working as a supermarket cashier used to flirt with the housewives and wink at them while he passed their steaks etc. into the bagging area without scanning them (don't know if/when he was caught.)
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:23 PM
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The odd thing is I was running a register and reading the thread. Within the 10 minutes or so it took to wait on 7 customers and read the thread I was positive 26 cents on the till. What everyone is forgetting is the people who's total is like 1.07 and toss you 1.25 and say keep the change. Next customer's bill is 1.02..."Don't worry about it!" If I don't want to dig out .98 from the register.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:30 PM
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OP, I’m curious what kind of answer you’re looking for? Seems like people have explained things pretty clearly (at least to this non business owner) but you still are dissatisfied. What would you like to hear? (And if what you want to hear is “it’s because they’re stupid” it’s fine to say that too ��)

Thanks.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:46 PM
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But you're talking about $2 lousy dollars for an entire day. It seems to me that these stores I'm talking about are behind at least 12 times that every single day.
I'm sure it does seem that way to you, but why? I mean, you don't work in the store, and I would be surprised if you said you had ever spent even a whole hour in the store because people don't normally spend an hour in convenience stores. There's no reason to think that if you saw them short the register a nickel in five minutes that it means it happens every five minutes, twelve times an hour ,twenty four hours a day, three hundred sixty five days a year to the tune of over $5K a year. There are probably hours where they don't even have 12 customers, much less 12 cash-paying customers with a total ending in .05 or .10. Because remember, it won't happen with anyone who is paying with a card, and it won't happen with people whose total ends in .25 or more.

And that's before you account for the people who don't want change from the $1.25 they gave you for the $1.07 total, or the people who get .57 in change and take the two quarters and leave the nickel and two pennies.


A gun store is a very different business- you probably don't have crowds of people wanting to get their guns and get out of there within five minutes. Getting customers in and out quickly has more value in a convenience store than in a gun store. Because if it takes me 10 minutes to pay for my coffee, I may start going elsewhere.

Last edited by doreen; 04-23-2018 at 09:50 PM.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:53 PM
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Most of the stores and restaurants I used to patronize had no registers and rounding down was routine. Chain stores, with registers, never round down. An exception occurs at some 7-Elevens when amount is a non-integral amount, e.g. ฿81.50. Then they usually round against the customer. (One time though a 7-Eleven cashier pushed a special button resulting in a receipt notation like "Customer given discount in lieu of 50-satang coin." Thailand has over 10,000 7-Eleven stores, making it 2nd only to Japan.)

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I think you are overestimating how frequently it occurs.... It's not all that common for someone to give the cashier $2 for a $1.05 total, unless they have a specific reason for needing coins, such as to feed a parking meter....
In that case, wouldn't he look with dismay when cashier returns one of the dollar bills? He'd say "I'd prefer the 95 cents change, please."
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:04 PM
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But you're talking about $2 lousy dollars for an entire day. It seems to me that these stores I'm talking about are behind at least 12 times that every single day.

I own a gun store. Our purchases are routinely in the hundreds and even thousands of dollars, sometimes in cash for high amounts. If our register was short the same percentage that the convenience stores is we'd put an end to it. There shouldn't be shortages at all, and especially on a daily basis, and especially intentional.
I'm guessing that A)you're making an assumption about how the convenience store's register balances by the end of the night and B)your store doesn't do hundreds and hundreds of cash transactions each day.

My store does about 300-400 transactions per day, I know they round up pr down here and there, but as I said, by the end of the day I'm only up or down a few dollars. An amount no one is batting an eye at.

You also keep on harping on the cashier shorting the drawer, but never take into consideration that some transactions result in extra money in there as well.

I also note that in your OP you said the cashier shorted the drawer by a nickel "several times a day". But later put it at closer to 20 times per hour or nearly 500 times a day.
I think that's part of the misconception as to what's going on. It's several times a day, not 300 or 400 or 500 times a day.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:26 PM
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In that case, wouldn't he look with dismay when cashier returns one of the dollar bills? He'd say "I'd prefer the 95 cents change, please."
Yes, but my point was that the register doesn't get shorted all that often- and if the customer says he'd prefer the 95 cents change, the cashier will give it to him and the register isn't shorted on that transaction.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:37 PM
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Nice try, but you're off by a factor of 3600.
Yeah. But 'round here, the seconds seem like hours, so philosophically I'm correct.

Just think of it as me slightly shorting the till of physical reality.
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Old 04-24-2018, 04:15 AM
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It could also be a burden for a small business to keep sufficient coinage available, so if they are giving $.95 change on multiple $x.05 purchases it can be a real pain to keep the register and store safe stocked with spare coins. Most people seem to only pay in round dollars, so it can be quite a hassle. If you're concerned about fraud, I would suspect the greater risk is inventory defalcation, which is much easier to hide in many stores that sell fungible goods in volume.
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Old 04-24-2018, 07:31 AM
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I don't know what the permitted variance on the till is where I work, they don't tell us cashiers, but given that there have been days I've done over $5k in cash transactions alone (usually around the holidays) and on a typical day a couple thousand being off by a whole dollar would be something like 0.02%. If for some reason there is an unacceptably large difference between what should be in the till and what actually is then, depending on the amount, either all cashiers who touched the drawer are put on "audit" for a day (their transactions are monitored more closely) or a criminal investigation ensues and the video is checked - every register has a camera above it and every transaction is filmed.

My company has decided that keeping a line five deep in waiting customers moving is more important that waiting for, say, a frail elderly person trying to dig the last $0.02 out of her teeny tiny change purse with arthritic fingers. Foregoing the two pennies keeps the customers - not just the little old lady but the five people behind her - happier. They'd rather have the sale of $100 or $200 than tell the person who came up short on groceries nope, you can't have any of it because you're short a nickel. I guess they figured the good will compensates for the minuscule loss, even if the profit margin on food is only about 3%. We have sufficient volume to cover it.

I don't know how they deal with it in the back office but they have some sort of system to cover it. The notion that each and every till has to balance exactly is incompatible with human beings moving at top speed for 8 hours at a stretch. Mistakes will happen. Coins will be dropped. Dollar bills might stick to each other. Sure, if we moved at half the speed there would be less of that, but really none of that is terribly common, either, and no one moves at less than full throttle these days. When things were slower and more people carried change exact tills were more of a thing but not anymore outside of small shops. Big box stores don't operate like that, valuing speed and volume over exactitude.
  #34  
Old 04-24-2018, 08:14 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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If I owned a store I would be more worried about employees ringing up a no sale and just pocketing the entire amount. A business owner just doesn't have time to be worried about a couple of cents here and there.
What decade are you living in? Only the managers can ring up a "No Sale" with their special keys, and we have two cameras on us at all times. I'm going to risk my job to take money out of the till? I don't think so.
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Old 04-24-2018, 08:38 AM
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Actually, at my store the cashiers can hit the "no sale" button. But yes, we, too, are on camera at all times. Obviously, different stores are different.

Cashiers at my store have more ability to resolve issues and can do things that other stores reserve to managers. That's a decision of the employer. Although, as I tell my customer, my super powers are limited and I've been sworn to use them only for good. I still have to send people to customer service or call a manager for a lot of things.
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Old 04-24-2018, 09:08 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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The notion that each and every till has to balance exactly is incompatible with human beings moving at top speed for 8 hours at a stretch. Mistakes will happen. Coins will be dropped. Dollar bills might stick to each other. .
Even not at top speed, mistakes happen. I worked for a few years at a coffeehouse that did a range of $900 - $1200 of sales per day, $1500 on really busy days during festivals or something like that. There'd be rushes, but nothing too crazy. And yet it was a miracle if we ever got the tills to balance to the penny. Some days you're up a buck; other days you're down a buck. Sometimes you're really close, but a penny fell. Etc. I do believe there have been times where it balanced exactly, but across six to eight employees throughout the day, it was unlikely. Plus, yes, there were times we'd be "don't worry about the two cents" or the customer was "don't worry about the change." If it was just a few pennies, nickels, etc. we just kept it in the drawer. If it was more, sure, we'd put it in the tip jar. I mean, when I go shopping and paying cash, I often tell the cashier to just not worry about the change if it's small change.
I don't need pennies and nickels in my wallet. I'm sure I'm far from the only one who does this. So there is also the matter of it somewhat balancing out during the course of a day.
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Old 04-24-2018, 09:08 AM
kanicbird kanicbird is offline
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It seems like the OP is very detailed orientated, but as pointed out it is not required, nor is it a tax hit, and does foster customer good will, and also that rounding does swing both ways, making life better for most people, cashier and customers, and as stated should have no effect on anything down the line.
  #38  
Old 04-24-2018, 09:16 AM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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What decade are you living in? Only the managers can ring up a "No Sale" with their special keys, and we have two cameras on us at all times. I'm going to risk my job to take money out of the till? I don't think so.
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Actually, at my store the cashiers can hit the "no sale" button. But yes, we, too, are on camera at all times. Obviously, different stores are different.
Never underestimate the stupidity and/or greed of people that steal. You get used to the cameras and don't think about them, you know the register was shorted a buck or two and no one said anything...it's not difficult to get a five dollar bill from the register to your pocket...no one says anything so you do it more often.

Even though no one ever said anything to you, they noticed, they find a pattern, they know who to watch, they catch it happening and you're fired. You had no idea any one had a clue and suddenly you get a call before your shift starts to let you know that you no longer work here.
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Old 04-24-2018, 09:22 AM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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I do 'No Sales' all the time and I'm nowhere near manager level.
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Old 04-24-2018, 09:28 AM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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I do 'No Sales' all the time and I'm nowhere near manager level.
Oh, with that, we let our employees do that as well. It's the only way they can open the drawer between customers to get rid of big bills, get change from the backroom during a break in customers or anything else that requires them to get into the drawer.

In the end, it doesn't really matter, if someone really wants to steal cash, they'll just do it while the drawer is opened from a sale.
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Old 04-24-2018, 08:52 PM
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I own a gun store. Our purchases are routinely in the hundreds and even thousands of dollars, sometimes in cash for high amounts. If our register was short the same percentage that the convenience stores is we'd put an end to it. There shouldn't be shortages at all, and especially on a daily basis, and especially intentional.
They're doing the same dollar volume in one hour that you're doing in one or two hours. Would you care that much if your till was off by $5 or $10 at the end of the day? I agree it's not right, but how much time is it going to take you to do a recount to either confirm your off, or worse, come up with a different number, which means you need to do a third count to see which one was right.

By dollar volume, it's not so much, by transaction count, you're right, it would be a large dollar amount.
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Old 04-24-2018, 09:27 PM
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I own a gun store. Our purchases are routinely in the hundreds and even thousands of dollars, sometimes in cash for high amounts. If our register was short the same percentage that the convenience stores is we'd put an end to it. There shouldn't be shortages at all, and especially on a daily basis, and especially intentional.
If your individual transactions are much larger, why would you expect rounding to get rid of annoying amounts of change to be anywhere near as large of a percentage of your total? If you're rounding off 10 cents on a $2.10 purchase, you're looking at 4.7%. If you're rounding off 10 cents on a $500.10 purchase, it's only .02%. This is just a weird comparison.
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Old 04-24-2018, 09:57 PM
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Would you care that much if your till was off by $5 or $10 at the end of the day?
$10 off Every day? Hell yeah, that'd be over 3 grand annually.

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This is just a weird comparison.
It wasn't a comparison, I was just pointing out that my business doesn't do the same type of sales/products as the convenience store. Sorry for the confusion.

I think there is a core disagreement here between myself and the rest of you. My observation is that this happens way more than some of you think, customers are not saying "keep the change" very often, which might balance out the till, and over the course of time this rounding practice does add up quit a bit. That's my observation but most of you apparently disagree.

If it isn't such a big deal how come one doesn't see it often in corporate stores? Because running a business this loosely does eventually cost much more money that it costs to recheck till balances, that's why.

I'll tell you, if our tills aren't coming out even, especially every day, even if by a minute' amount, something would be done.
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Last edited by pkbites; 04-24-2018 at 10:00 PM.
  #44  
Old 04-24-2018, 10:20 PM
doreen doreen is online now
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If it isn't such a big deal how come one doesn't see it often in corporate stores? Because running a business this loosely does eventually cost much more money that it costs to recheck till balances, that's why.
No, that's actually not why. It's because corporations don't give individual store managers the level of autonomy that a small business owner has and because corporations don't have the same knowledge of their employees that small business owners often have. There are all sorts of things I've seen mom-and pop stores do that corporate stores don't do. Run a tab for regular customers, close the store down for a week for a vacation, or a day for a funeral - see that all the time with mom and pops, but never in corporate stores. It's very common for a mom & pop to only employ family members, but that doesn't happen in corporate stores - and there's a real difference between trusting your wife or your son or your cousin who might as well be your brother not to steal a couple of bucks a day out of the register and trusting 2000 faceless people who you've never met not to do the same in your 500 stores. Not to mention that corporate stores are often responsible to stockholders while mom & pops are not.

Last edited by doreen; 04-24-2018 at 10:21 PM.
  #45  
Old 04-24-2018, 11:21 PM
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No, that's actually not why.
I disagree.
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  #46  
Old 04-24-2018, 11:35 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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My observation is that this happens way more than some of you think, customers are not saying "keep the change" very often, which might balance out the till, and over the course of time this rounding practice does add up quit a bit.
You asserted that cashiers short the drawer by about a nickel nearly 500 times per day, but also suggest that customers don't say 'keep the change' very often.

Multiple people in this thread, myself included, that run registers for hours at a time, are telling you that both of those statements are incorrect, to some degree or another.

We've mentioned all kinds of reason why it happens, to which you've shot down all of them.

I'm not really sure what you want.
  #47  
Old 04-25-2018, 01:10 AM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
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OP, it seems that you're not paying attention. Maybe other answers were too long or complicated? OK.

OP, you're wrong. It doesn't make any difference.
  #48  
Old 04-25-2018, 01:30 AM
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Multiple people in this thread, myself included, that run registers for hours at a time, are telling you that both of those statements are incorrect, to some degree or another.
Except you are not running registers in the places I've observed this happen.
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  #49  
Old 04-25-2018, 05:13 AM
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You asserted that cashiers short the drawer by about a nickel nearly 500 times per day, but also suggest that customers don't say 'keep the change' very often.

Multiple people in this thread, myself included, that run registers for hours at a time, are telling you that both of those statements are incorrect, to some degree or another.
Perhaps the customers who say "keep the odd nickel" are the same ones who got a nickel discount a few days before. A cashier will see fewer of the former if he isn't rounding down for the latter.
  #50  
Old 04-25-2018, 05:55 AM
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There is an obvious solution. The purchasing power of a Dollar is pretty small now - mayby these tiny, low value coins have outlived their usefulness. Certainly anything smaller than a quarter.
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