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Old 07-15-2018, 02:47 PM
Asuka Asuka is offline
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What exactly was the cause for bowling going out of favor in the past 30 years?

I was recently listening to "The Dollop" podcast about the history of bowling and while interesting they make a major point at the end to claim the reason for bowling's demise in America (The United States only has 1/3rd of the bowling alleys it had at it's peak in the 1970's despite the fact the US added 1/3rd to its population since then) is solely due to the fact of wage stagnation and the destruction of the blue collar job. Basically they claimed because people in the lower income brackets are now making less money than before like in the 1970's/80's they don't have enough money to spend on "frivolous" fun things like bowling anymore.

This set off all sorts of alarm bells to me because they stated it so confidently but never addressed the other elephant in the room. Maybe the cultural and technological evolution since the 1970's made bowling less appealing to people, why go out and bowl when you can stay at home and watch a movie, play bowling on your video game console, or do anything else that people seem more interested in now?

I looked up some articles and they basically split the difference, they claim that while bowling is more of a "white-collar" form of entertainment now they also claim increased pressures from other forms of entertainment. So whats the answer?
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Old 07-15-2018, 03:21 PM
dougrb dougrb is offline
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I went bowling a few years ago for the first time since I was a kid. This was at a small town alley with only four lanes. Had an enjoyable enough time, but I do remember thinking the price seemed very high.
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Old 07-15-2018, 03:25 PM
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Maybe they're looking at this from the wrong direction. Maybe the public interest in bowling is now at its "normal" level. The higher interest in bowling during the seventies may have just been a fad.
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Old 07-15-2018, 03:40 PM
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Some of it probably has to do with the crackdown on drinking and driving since the 70's. Bowling night was really "getting tanked" night for a lot of the folks I knew back then.
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Old 07-15-2018, 03:47 PM
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I suspect bowling was even more popular (at least percentage wise) in the 60s than in the 70s. There were all kinds of adult bowling leagues where I lived. There was one every night of the week as I recall.

I suspect my generation started to give it up because it was something our parents did and we were all aghast at what my parents generation did like start the Vietnam war.

Last edited by OldGuy; 07-15-2018 at 03:48 PM.
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:18 PM
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but I do remember thinking the price seemed very high.
I agree. It is expensive.

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Originally Posted by wolfman View Post
Bowling night was really "getting tanked" night for a lot of the folks I knew back then.
Yup!

There are still bowling leagues and professional bowlers so it's not completely dead. But, yeah, I notice the parking lots aren't as full as they used to be on Friday nights. The bowling alleys used to be a fun place to hang out at even if one wasn't bowling. The bar area might have had a band on the weekend, some of them had banquet rooms for weddings and such.

Don't know why casual bowling has declined though. Maybe because The Flintstones and Laverne & Shirley are no longer on prime time?

Heh.
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:46 PM
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I blame the shoes.
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:50 PM
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The usual text to refer to here is Bowling Alone by Putnam, which blames it all on... spins wheel... technology and social change, but the book's attracted some interesting replies:
Quote:
Everett Carll Ladd claimed that Putnam completely ignored existing field studies, most notably the landmark sociological Middletown studies,[6] which during the 1920s raised the same concerns he does today, except the technology being attacked as promoting isolation was radio, instead of television and video games.[7]

Other critics have also directly attacked the veracity of Putnam's major finding—that civic participation has in fact been declining. Journalist Nicholas Lemann proposed that rather than declining, civic activity in the US during the 1990s assumed different forms. Instead of bowling leagues, parents integrated themselves into social networks and contribute to the social capital e.g. via youth soccer leagues.[8]
Always good to check to see if the social trend you want to explain at book length is, in fact, a social trend, and not something else, like... nothing.
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:54 PM
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Now seriously, what I'm seeing where I live is bowling sharing the building with other activities, like paintball and climbing walls and that kind of thing ... And reframed more towards kid-centric activities, which is very different from how bowling was marketed in years past, with the bar and etc.

Here's an example, they have laser tag too ... Stars and Strikes.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:02 PM
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I blame the shoes.
You joke, but apparently some lanes will now let you bowl in street shoes.

I'm quite sure there are fewer lanes now than they used to be, but the couple of times a year I go bowling the remaining ones appear to be doing fine. There are even "hipster bowling lanes" because I guess you have to be ironic about it to enjoy it; although the one time I went to such a place, the guy one lane over (bowling alone, natch) seemed to be a professional or at least a very talented and dedicated amateur, with game scores in the 220-230 range.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:03 PM
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But hasn't participation in many adult, pedestrian sports declined over the past few decades? I'm pretty sure golf, racquetball, tennis, pool/billiards, softball, and swimming have also had significant declines.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:09 PM
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I suspect bowling was even more popular (at least percentage wise) in the 60s than in the 70s. There were all kinds of adult bowling leagues where I lived. There was one every night of the week as I recall.
Yeah, that was actually part of the problem. The leagues would have all the lanes reserved during the most popular times throughout the week, so families and party groups couldn't get in, and eventually found other cheap forms of recreation.

The death of blue collar jobs also had a side effect of killing the defined work shift. When your company wouldn't let you work after 5:00 (because they'd have to pay time and a half) you were pretty sure you'd be home at the same time every night, which meant you had evenings open to bowl, play softball, or even 9 holes of golf during the summer. Not so much for white collar types who were pressured to work 50-60 or more hours per week.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:19 PM
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. . . why go out and bowl when you can stay at home and watch a movie, play bowling on your video game console, or do anything else that people seem more interested in now?
In other words, "Why spend more money at a bowling alley when you can do something that's cheaper and easier at home?"

So that's kind of begging the question in the podcast. Notice that the entertainment center cited in TubaDiva's post is heavily using price discrimination for off-nights, to get people to bowl. I'm not well versed in this business, but it would seem to me that maintaining a bowling alley in good working condition runs high overhead. If the drinking component is gone, not only is demand down, but probably a good part of the profit.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:43 PM
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When I was in grade school (early 60’s) it was your usual go-to for a birthday party. Once a guy showed up with his own bowling ball in a carrying bag and we all thought “what the fuck?!?” Even then I knew we were bowling ironically.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:45 PM
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Part of the reason is that over the last 20 or 30 years, the bowling industry has changed. In the past, nearly all bowling alleys courted league bowlers that would fill the lanes for 36 weeks a year and summer leagues that filled them in the summer. They got discounted prices , but a league would sign a contract guaranteeing a certain number of games every week for a certain number of weeks. About 20 years or so ago, there was a shift and a lot of bowling centers began to focus on events and parties which allowed them to charge higher prices than they could get from league bowlers and also to make more money from food and beverage sales than they made from league bowlers. I don't think this is just a side effect of losing league bowlers- I think it was one of the causes. Because what started to happen was that the bowling alleys would no longer sign contracts with as many leagues, because they need to leave room for the events. That included kid's leagues- the last season my son bowled as a child, there was only one weekend kid's league left in my area. * The fewer kids leagues there are , the fewer adult bowlers you will have. And even people who have bowled in multiple leagues for years will stop bowling when they can't find a league that has room for them, that suits their schedule and is within a reasonable distance.

There are also other factors involved - for example, the bowling alleys in my area that actually shut down didn't do so because of lack of business. They shut down because the owner of the property either thought another business would pay a higher rent ( and they weren't always correct about that) or because the owner of both the bowling alley and the property for whatever reason decided to sell the property. But no matter what the reason for shutting down, it's going to contribute to the decrease in lanes.




*Which ended up being a horrible mash-up of beginners and high school varsity bowlers averaging over 200 that no one enjoyed. It had originally been two separate leagues, but the bowling alley put then together to free up time for other events.
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Old 07-15-2018, 06:19 PM
Tastes of Chocolate Tastes of Chocolate is offline
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I bet television, cable and AC have all added to the downward trend in bowling popularity, much like they have added to the decreased popularity of going to the movies.

If I can get home from work, turn on the TV and pick from 200+channels or all the on-demand stuff, while sitting in the comfort of my climate controlled house, why would I go bowling instead?
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Old 07-15-2018, 07:37 PM
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Yeah, that was actually part of the problem. The leagues would have all the lanes reserved during the most popular times throughout the week, so families and party groups couldn't get in, and eventually found other cheap forms of recreation.
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Part of the reason is that over the last 20 or 30 years, the bowling industry has changed. In the past, nearly all bowling alleys courted league bowlers that would fill the lanes for 36 weeks a year and summer leagues that filled them in the summer. They got discounted prices , but a league would sign a contract guaranteeing a certain number of games every week for a certain number of weeks. About 20 years or so ago, there was a shift and a lot of bowling centers began to focus on events and parties which allowed them to charge higher prices than they could get from league bowlers and also to make more money from food and beverage sales than they made from league bowlers.
So my interpretation is that too many leagues killed off the casual bowler, and doreen feels that catering to the casual bowler killed off the leagues. Interesting.

Note, I'm talking about the 1960s-1970s, and she's talking about the 1980s-1990s.

And I agree with her that kids aren't being exposed to bowling like they used to be.
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:34 PM
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I think bowling filled a niche of something to do that anyone could do. Now we have other things that anyone can do like the internet.
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:39 PM
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I think it is just part of a societal change. Bowling was very much a social event. People meeting to hang out, drinking, smoking (weed?) etc. Seems like today there is less getting together in person. Lots of getting to know folk on line without ever meeting them in person.
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Old 07-15-2018, 11:12 PM
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Bowling died when Earl Anthony retired.
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Old 07-16-2018, 07:53 AM
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Another vote for TV.

Television drastically changed a lot of social activities. For bowling, the current bowlers kept on bowling for the most part but there were fewer and fewer young bowlers coming into the sport. Once it became to be seen as an "old person's sport" the numbers really started to fall off.
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Old 07-16-2018, 08:57 AM
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All of this feels like overthinking it. Trends rise and fall, fashions change, fads come and go. A bunch of bowling alleys opened up back in the 60s and 70s and did well, but then people got bored and found something else to do. Maybe in 20 or 30 years it'll come back into style. This thread feels like a bunch of intellectuals trying to figure out socioeconomic reasons for Dance Dance Revolution not being as popular as it was in 2002.
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Old 07-16-2018, 10:46 AM
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When I was a kid we had what I believed to be the biggest bowling center in the world about a mile from our house. 118 lanes, if I'm not mistaken. We did our fair share of bowling but the pinball machines are what brought my friends and me back. Five balls per game (five actual balls, not the same one used five times.) and some of the older machines required you to manually lift the next ball into the launch area. There was a second plunger type handle under the launch handle to do this. I clearly remember when they brought in the first air hockey table and let us play for free for quite a while to get our impressions.

The bowling ally site is now a Target or something. I blame the increasing cost of a game of pinball for the demise of bowling. ;-)
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Old 07-16-2018, 10:52 AM
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When I was growing up, my parents were in bowling leagues, and one thing I recall from then was industry consolidation--it seemed to go from a bunch of independent bowling alleys to everything being AMF. Looks like AMF's gone through a couple of different bankruptcies, I presume part of it was a matter of a corporation over-extending itself just as the demographics are changing, it can't really react well because it just spent all it's money buying all of these huge buildings. So they start consolidating/shutting down poorer performers, which just further spirals down the hobby.
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Old 07-16-2018, 10:55 AM
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My first job was keeping score for leagues in a bowling alley in Torrance California. Gable House Bowling. Great fun.

But I'll also admit that, in the early 80s (I was about 13 or so) I wandered in because it had a full fleet of video games instead of going to bowl.
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Old 07-16-2018, 11:24 AM
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I blame the shoes.
Heh. I do not bowl, but I had a really cool pair of retro/art nouveau shoes that looked exactly like bowling shoes. They were also the most expensive shoes I've ever owned.
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Old 07-16-2018, 12:22 PM
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It is definitely overpriced for one.

Second, somewhat expensive gear-wise if you want to get at all serious in the game. Technology has massively changed over the last 30 years.

Finally, there are several times per year where a casual can't get a lane because of league night, which is absolutely infuriating.

Poor perception of bowling in general. Even though it is NOT cheap, it's perceived as a blue collar "sport" full of losers, hot heads, and drunks (see: 1996's "Kingpin"). I think this is slowly changing.

Last edited by Ashtura; 07-16-2018 at 12:23 PM.
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Old 07-16-2018, 01:51 PM
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It is definitely overpriced for one.

Second, somewhat expensive gear-wise if you want to get at all serious in the game. Technology has massively changed over the last 30 years.

Finally, there are several times per year where a casual can't get a lane because of league night, which is absolutely infuriating.

Poor perception of bowling in general. Even though it is NOT cheap, it's perceived as a blue collar "sport" full of losers, hot heads, and drunks (see: 1996's "Kingpin"). I think this is slowly changing.
Yeah, well, that's just like, your opinion, man.
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Old 07-16-2018, 02:16 PM
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I'm not sure how big a contributor it is, but it seems like these days families are much more focused on the kids' activities. For many families I know there are 2-3 kids and the parents are shuttling them to/from activities 5 nights a week or more. That doesn't leave much time for Mom or Dad to go bowling.
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Old 07-16-2018, 02:27 PM
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I'm not sure how big a contributor it is, but it seems like these days families are much more focused on the kids' activities. For many families I know there are 2-3 kids and the parents are shuttling them to/from activities 5 nights a week or more. That doesn't leave much time for Mom or Dad to go bowling.
It could be. When I was growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, in Illinois and (especially) in Wisconsin, bowling was huge. Men's leagues tended to be on weekday evenings, and (probably a lot like fraternal organizations like the Moose and Elks, which have also declined dramatically) it was a vehicle to socialize with other men, without the families present. Women's leagues tended to be during the day, as more women were stay-at-home moms then, and it was a way for them to socialize with other women, without their husbands around -- the alleys where my mom bowled had "kids' rooms" where they could park us, just like the tennis club did.

All of those dynamics have changed since then.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 07-16-2018 at 02:28 PM.
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Old 07-16-2018, 02:31 PM
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I'm not sure how big a contributor it is, but it seems like these days families are much more focused on the kids' activities. For many families I know there are 2-3 kids and the parents are shuttling them to/from activities 5 nights a week or more. That doesn't leave much time for Mom or Dad to go bowling.
I agree with this. We have a small alley in our town with 20 or so lanes. It has been there a long time, and some would say it is run-down, but others, like myself, think it's just fine. My kids occasionally went there, but as stated upthread, it was usually for parties, and rarely a small group drop-in - never a league.

I think in addition to what has been stated already, the increased size of our homes may be a factor. Most entertainment happens at home now with gaming rooms, Netflix, huge TV screens, etc. In the 60s and 70s people still depended on away-from-home sources of entertainment, such as bowling alleys, public pools, parks, movie theaters, libraries, etc. You had to leave home to be entertained. I wonder if there is a parallel decline in usage of these sorts of facilities as well.

Now you can bowl all night in the comfort of your own home for free on a gaming system, toss some frozen wings in the oven, and drink your own microbrew, and not have to worry about getting home safely.
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Old 07-16-2018, 03:37 PM
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One thing that didn't help bowling was the bad job they did running and broadcasting bowling championships. The stepladder format for the finals was supposed to make things more exciting but, to me, had the opposite effect. The commentary and such was basic.

Note that there isn't a lot you can say about what a bowler is about to do. There's one pin left standing, what sort of color commentary are you going to add? Controversial "plays" are few and far between. It's more boring than golf!

And the crowd sizes are small. Doesn't compare to 20k+ you could get with a football or baseball game.

If you don't grab people on TV, the sport isn't going to thrive.
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Old 07-16-2018, 03:55 PM
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My guess at the reason for "bowling ironically" is also my guess for the reason bowling has declined. I see bowling as a game for older blue-collar men. Older blue-collar men of the type who bowled regularly are pretty much gone.
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Old 07-16-2018, 04:43 PM
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This town is blue-collar and low income. The population is about 11,000,and the demographics over the last decade show a large increase of Hispanics and an increase of Africans. (No, not African Americans. Africans.) The idea that bowling is for blue-collar workers seems...hmmm...prejudicial. The bowling alley here went out of business so long ago that we (newcomers of 3 years) have never been given directions including the phrase "where the bowling alley used to be." There is no indication that there is any attempt by anyone to open a business for recreation such as bowling. We wish someone would open a mini-golf course, but no.
I think there are some economic and social factors to the demise of bowling. It has gotten more expensive. There are cheaper forms of entertainment. I don't know about others but we don't bowl. We might go bowling if an alley would decide to ditch the deafening (and repulsive) music choices, but I don't see that happening, either.
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Old 07-16-2018, 07:13 PM
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I think the better question is why the sudden surge in bowling that started in the late 50s, stayed high through the 60s and then dropped back to its previous level. You cannot blame TV because those years were the golden age of TV. Incidentally, I started bowling in the late 50s and did for four or five years, including being in a league, but then stopped for lack of continued interest and have bowled only a few times since. Oh, and I think I inured my back. The few times I have bowled since then were ducks (or, once, candle-pins a form of bowling devised for masochists only).
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Old 07-16-2018, 08:56 PM
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Anybody remember The bowling Game or "Bowling for dollars" that a lot of local media markets had? It was immensely popular here in the 70's and 80's.
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Old 07-16-2018, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Derleth View Post
The usual text to refer to here is Bowling Alone by Putnam, which blames it all on... spins wheel... technology and social change, but the book's attracted some interesting replies:Always good to check to see if the social trend you want to explain at book length is, in fact, a social trend, and not something else, like... nothing.
Anyone claiming that social activity has declined should observe that thirty people are here having a discussion together on the issue.
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Old 07-16-2018, 10:23 PM
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Anyone claiming that social activity has declined should observe that thirty people are here having a discussion together on the issue.
I would wager that Putnam would strongly argue with your use of the word "together" in your statement, or that an online message board is "social activity". Personally, I think he's a little self-contradictory. Here he suggests that "Barn-raising on the frontier was social capital in action, and so too are e-mail exchanges among members of a cancer support group" - but I think he'd look at a broader-based message board such as ours as something else entirely. There's likely a line there somewhere. Maybe it's the anonymity?
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Old 07-17-2018, 05:31 AM
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If anyone is interesting here's the time stamp in "The Dollop" podcast where they briefly talk about how lack of money is what killed bowling (it seems like they talk about it for longer earlier but just scrubbing through I can't seem to find it)

http://thedollop.libsyn.com/187-the-...ing-in-america

1:05:13
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Old 07-17-2018, 06:04 AM
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Even crown green bowling has declined hereabouts, and that's much more of a spectator sport. Where we play croquet has two bowling greens and we use one and I've never seen the other in use.
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Old 07-17-2018, 07:07 AM
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We wish someone would open a mini-golf course, but no.
That's another story. Challenging mini-golf courses are almost non-existent, because they are mostly seen as ironic because their metal and/or concrete sides remind people of cheesy old-school decorations like dinosaurs and windmills. The new ones with waterfalls and pirate ships look nice from a distance, but it's almost impossible to plot where your ball will go with the brick and/or rock sides.
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Old 07-17-2018, 08:16 AM
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I see bowling as a game for older blue-collar men. Older blue-collar men of the type who bowled regularly are pretty much gone.
A couple decades ago, wasn't bowling a big thing among night-shift workers?
As I recall, many bowling lanes were open 24 hours; after the shift ended at midnight, bowling was a common activity for after-work socializing.
But that was when unionized factory workers worked regular shifts with standard hours --not like today's retail workers who never know when their next shift will be.
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Old 07-17-2018, 08:34 AM
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I think the better question is why the sudden surge in bowling that started in the late 50s, stayed high through the 60s and then dropped back to its previous level.
I think it’s not coincidence that the rise and decline of bowling matches the period of peak affluence of the white working class. Bowling is expensive, but it was affordable during that time period because incomes were relatively high. Since wages have stagnated, bowling has become increasingly too expensive.
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Old 07-17-2018, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
Anybody remember The bowling Game or "Bowling for dollars" that a lot of local media markets had? It was immensely popular here in the 70's and 80's.
When the news was discussing the NHL trying to expand into the USA around 1970 and get hockey onto network TV, I remember some factoid that the three biggest sports on broadcast TV were baseball, then football, then bowling. Eventually basketball overtook bowling. One of the Buffalo channels (4?) had the Bowling for Dollars show every afternoon, until old reruns came along to fill the time slot much cheaper.

(A Buffalo channel also used to have the afternoon money giveaway - they'd announce who they were going to phone, call the house, and if the person could tell them what was happening on the show they were playing, would win a small prize. They stopped announcing the address when they called one house, nobody answered, so someone went and robbed the place.)

I suspect that bowling suffered from an image problem. It was more for old guys looking for an excuse to get out of the house and drink ("lodge" was a close second there) and for blue collar class. The fact that old white guys from the Flintstones to Jackie Gleason to any other similar demographic were most often shown as bowlers, didn't make it "cool". You never saw Dick on Bewitched bowling for example IIRC and he had a more upscale job. You never saw Beaver or My Three Sons bowling that I recall - not shown as a child-centric activity. Archie Bunker IIRC bowled but Meathead didn't. Rarely saw women portrayed as bowling. The 60's -70's counter-culture also helped make bowling un-cool, rejecting what was the norm for the previous generation.

Like the family dinner, many other family-centered activities seem to have fallen by the wayside, and as mentioned about cable TV, far more choices compete for people's attention.
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Old 07-17-2018, 09:56 AM
Surreal Surreal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
When the news was discussing the NHL trying to expand into the USA around 1970 and get hockey onto network TV, I remember some factoid that the three biggest sports on broadcast TV were baseball, then football, then bowling. Eventually basketball overtook bowling. One of the Buffalo channels (4?) had the Bowling for Dollars show every afternoon, until old reruns came along to fill the time slot much cheaper.
I believe that bowling still has higher viewership in the US than NHL hockey.
  #46  
Old 07-17-2018, 11:43 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
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The drinking and driving thing is probably a factor but not the major one. Part of it may be the decrease in league activity due to more job mobility. When people worked their whole lives at one job enduring bowling leagues could form based on that relationship. To keep a league going now is a lot more difficult. Life mobility in general has increased, people change their lives more often in many ways, marital status changes, spending more time at home with their kids with both parents working, more child focused activities outside the home as well. Another change on the job front is the hours with fewer people working factory hours that would leave them time for a weekly bowling night. The few alleys still in business around here are doing well but have added a ton of arcade games and seem to be booking a lot of parties not leagues.
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Old 07-17-2018, 12:07 PM
Mrdeals Mrdeals is offline
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Bowling is still popular here in the upper Midwest.

However, all of the popular bowling alleys have added things like; arcade games, laser tag, full service restaurant, etc.
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Old 07-17-2018, 12:11 PM
SmellMyWort SmellMyWort is offline
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Is bowling really that expensive? I think it's only $5 a game at the place near me, a little more if you have to rent shoes. Sure, a more serious bowler might choose to buy a ball and shoes, but a lot of sports have some basic equipment you'll want to purchase if you really get into it. When I was in a league a few years ago it was something like $12/week but that included 3 games and a pizza buffet on bowling night and a $50 voucher you could use either at the pro shop or toward drinks/food.
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Old 07-17-2018, 01:02 PM
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Another doubter of the costs of bowling. My mother was quite a good bowler. Her team won some local championships. And we were not exactly well off, to say the least. But she could afford shows, ball, bag, team shirt, etc.

I think once the decline set in fees went up to compensate, but not during the heyday.
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Old 07-17-2018, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
It could be. When I was growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, in Illinois and (especially) in Wisconsin, bowling was huge. Men's leagues tended to be on weekday evenings, and (probably a lot like fraternal organizations like the Moose and Elks, which have also declined dramatically) it was a vehicle to socialize with other men, without the families present. Women's leagues tended to be during the day, as more women were stay-at-home moms then, and it was a way for them to socialize with other women, without their husbands around -- the alleys where my mom bowled had "kids' rooms" where they could park us, just like the tennis club did.

All of those dynamics have changed since then.
I agree that this is probably a big part of it. Back then many less women worked; they were stay-at-home moms, tended to the kids & ran errands during the day. Dad came home to a cooked meal ready & waiting & not much to do afterwards. Now, with more people working, & with longer commutes there isn't as much time for these events. Volunteer firefighters & EMS are waaay down. Other fraternal organizations are also down. It seems there's less free time & more activities available to occupy that less time than there used to be.
We got cable in the early 80s-ish range. More channels & less ghosts from lousy reception. VCRs & the ability to watch a movie at home (repeatedly) also contributed.
We just went out & played as kids, now it seems there's a lot less of that & much more in terms of organized activities for the kids, which also cuts into the parent's free time.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TubaDiva View Post
I blame the shoes.
We were in HS & went to some (underage) dance club about 40 mins one weekend night. About ˝ of us wore shoes while the other ˝ wore sneakers. Quickly realizing how long the round trip would be, especially when including a stop at each person's house for them to run in, find & change their footwear meant we'd get back way to late to make it worthwhile. Someone got the bright idea that there was a bowling alley around the corner. In five mins, we had gone, rented shoes & were back to the dance club.

Picking up girls is tough at that age, it's extra tough when you're wearing three-colored velcro-closing shoes.
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