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Old 08-10-2018, 11:03 AM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is online now
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What changed public opinion regarding marijuana legalization?

Looking at chart like this: http://weedjournal.org/2015/04/14/ne...ana-44-oppose/

What factors changed people's minds on the issue of marijuana decriminalization or legalization? It's not just due to old people dying as the link above shows. Which demographic groups are most or least in favor of it?


How much overlap is there between the opposition/change in support for pot legalization and the opposition/change in support for gay marriage?

After gay marriage and pot legalization are largely settled and only subject to guerilla attacks by opponents, what might be the next "the sky will fall if we do this" reform?
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Old 08-10-2018, 11:33 AM
BeepKillBeep BeepKillBeep is online now
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I cannot speak for anybody else, but I used to be opposed to legalization, but as findings showed that medical marijuana was clearly helpful my position relaxed at least in so far as medical marijuana. As my position relaxed with respect to medical marijuana, I just stopped caring that much about it being illegal. I'm not necessarily for legalization, I just no longer opposed to it.

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Old 08-10-2018, 11:37 AM
Llama Llogophile Llama Llogophile is offline
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Never been a user myself, but I’ve always supported legalization / decriminalization.

My position with regard to marijuana was further emboldened by something a paramedic friend told me: “I’ve been on hundreds of domestic abuse calls, and not one of them involved someone smoking pot and then beating up their wife.”
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Old 08-10-2018, 12:27 PM
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It has become increasingly difficult for the government and their protected economic blocs to hide behind prohibition propaganda. Despite the comprehensive Cannabis Federal Sched_I Ban, Independent research and State legalization efforts have steadily uncovered the truth about Marijuana. The WHO endorses CBD, a primary Cannabis derivative, as a safe, effective treatment for numerous conditions. The Marijuana prohibition era will likely go down in history as one of the greatest frauds ever perpetrated by a government against it's citizens, Notwithstanding Trump.
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Old 08-10-2018, 12:29 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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I have long felt that all drug laws do more harm than good. Let me emphasize that I am not a drug user. I did try marijuana once (even inhaled; I was a cigarette smoker then) and it had no effect that I could see, so my feelings on drug laws is not personal. Let me try to state my reasons.

There were no drug laws in the 19th century US and the world didn't end. As far as I can see, they were originally passed to give the DEA agents something to do after repeal of prohibition.

Still drugs weren't a really serious problem until Nixon declared a war on drugs.

The drug laws, whatever the intent seem to be mainly used as an excuse to put blacks into prisons.

And they seem to be largely responsible for the refugee crisis. Without the US drug laws, Central American and Mexican gangs would not have formed for the purpose of smuggling drugs into the US with the lawnessness that resulted. They would be legitimate businessmen providing drugs for a legal market. As an aside I might point out that legal businesses fight each other in court; illegal ones resort to guns.

Prohibition was ultimately seen as a disaster and repealed; drug laws will ultimately go the same way. Although only by beating all lobbyists for the prison-industrial complex.
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Old 08-10-2018, 12:29 PM
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Boomers got older. The original oldsters died off.
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:03 PM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is online now
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Originally Posted by Llama Llogophile View Post
something a paramedic friend told me: “I’ve been on hundreds of domestic abuse calls, and not one of them involved someone smoking pot and then beating up their wife.”
I think one of the main sources of opposition is the idea that cigarettes and alcohol are legal and cause a lot of damage so if we add pot to the list, it'll create as much damage as cigarettes and alcohol.

My guess is that there will largely be a replacement effect among users of alcohol/tobacco. Dim, lazy, kinda shitty people with anxiety, depression and other forms of mental illness who would normally self-medicate with alcohol and become horribly abusive or complete fuckups but with pot will slightly improve to the level of being merely mediocre.

Is there data on how chronic use of alcohol changes neurology or behavior compared to chronic use of pot? I remember Robert Sapolsky saying that heavy use of alcohol is one of the most effective ways to shrink your prefontral cortex.

What do the preferred substances of homeless people tend to be? I mainly associate homelessness with alcohol, tobacco, opioids, meth and crack although that may be inaccurate. Are there many homeless people who prefer pot (or people with a preference for pot who become homeless)?

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Old 08-10-2018, 01:17 PM
BeenJammin BeenJammin is offline
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Dim, lazy, kinda shitty people with anxiety, depression and other forms of mental illness..
So what category would autistic and epilectic people having great success with Cannabis treatment be? Just Dim? Maybe lazy? I suppose shitty covers them all, generally speaking.
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:20 PM
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Despite the comprehensive Cannabis Federal Sched_I Ban,...
I should probably add willful ignorance here. "Despite the comprehensive Cannabis Federal Sched_I Ban and alot of willful ignorance..."
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:24 PM
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Only 17% of Boomers supported legalization in 1990, that has increased to 56% today. It could be because they had much younger children back then, and being notorious helicopter parents, were terrified their children might repeat what young folks were doing in the 1960s-1970s. Maybe since they've moved on to opiates and lord knows what else, they realized weed is not actually all that bad.

Millennials have also increased their support from 34% in 2006 to 71% today. Many of them were probably still under the fog of government propaganda and socialized education in general in 2006. Much of what the Boomers told them does not jive with their life experience, and therefore they reject these old Puritan ideas.

One factor has to be the depiction of marijuana use in pop culture. It has changed quite a bit.


http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank...inues-to-rise/

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Old 08-10-2018, 01:28 PM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is online now
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So what category would autistic and epilectic people having great success with Cannabis treatment be? Just Dim? Maybe lazy? I suppose shitty covers them all, generally speaking.
I should have phrased it more precisely and said that its main abuse-related effect on dysfunctional people will be to make steer them away from becomming horrible/fuckups with alcohol to merely mediocre with pot. I don't think consuming pot means one is lazy and dim. I do think dim and lazy people are the most likely to be problem users but that being a problem user of pot is usually better than being a problem user of alcohol.
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:36 PM
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Gone are the days when we chose political affiliation based on our beliefs. Now we choose our beliefs based on our political affiliation. And marijuana legalization has become one of the things you're supposed to support if you are a Democrat / Liberal.
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:47 PM
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Gone are the days when we chose political affiliation based on our beliefs. Now we choose our beliefs based on our political affiliation. And marijuana legalization has become one of the things you're supposed to support if you are a Democrat / Liberal.
/ Educated / Aware of the facts about what it actually does / Aware of the uses of it / Aware of the costs of banning it
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:57 PM
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Actually, a majority of Republicans support marijuana legalization.

I think the main factors driving the change are 1. All the relentless carping about nanny states and oppressive regulations just does not jibe with pot prohibition and 2. To defend pot's status as a schedule I drug requires a policymaker to either be ignorant to the point of illiterate or else a shameless liar. People are getting sick of such obvious bullshit.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by WillFarnaby View Post
Only 17% of Boomers supported legalization in 1990, that has increased to 56% today. It could be because they had much younger children back then, and being notorious helicopter parents, were terrified their children might repeat what young folks were doing in the 1960s-1970s. Maybe since they've moved on to opiates and lord knows what else, they realized weed is not actually all that bad.
I think this has a lot to do with it. Not necessarily that their kids have moved on to opiates or dangerous drugs, but just that they witnessed their kids using marijuana (despite it being illegal, and perhaps despite their own objections) and their kids turned out ok so....they changed their mind. My own parents are pretty liberal people but they never really were into any kind of drugs, my mom never used it in her earlier days, my dad tried it a few times but mostly just preferred beer and wine to the feeling of being stoned.

They weren't authoritarian parents but their opinion of marijuana seemed to be that it was for lazy slacker kids and should be discouraged. Lo and behold, both myself and my sister started smoking it regularly beginning in our late teens and continuing to the present day, and both of us grew up fine into functioning and productive adults, so by the time we were in our mid 20s our parents had fully embraced the idea that there was really nothing wrong with weed, and became totally cool with us smoking it around them. Today I am sure that if you asked either of them if marijuana should be legalized they would both say "YES!" even though neither of them actually use it.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:10 PM
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What formed my opinion in the first place was seeing the results of alcohol prohibition and correlating them with the current War on Drugs. Note that I am in favour of legalising all of them - cannabis, opium, heroin, LSD, the lot.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:13 PM
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Another factor: state excise taxes and the prospect of that money going toward schools or public health programs or treatment centers. Washington state has a 37% excise tax on marijuana sales and collected $730 million last year. I think a lot of people decided if so many people were going to smoke it anyway, the state might as well get some money off it to support good causes.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:16 PM
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Ironically, I think if there's anything that should be illegal, it's alcohol. It is the most destructive drug that exists. But I know that can never happen, and it would be stupid to try. I do, however, think there should be more of an effort - from a public health and public safety standpoint - to curb excessive drinking. I do not think the culture of "social" drinking in America is a positive thing. (It's different in other countries like Italy and France.) American drinking culture, like most aspects of American culture, promotes the idea of excess to the max, and binge drinking is way too common. There should be more propaganda (I use this term in a neutral sense, not with the negative connotations that are typically ascribed to it) directed at promoting the idea that binge drinking is bad, that it's fucked up, that there's nothing cool about it, that there is literally NO good reason to have more than a few drinks at once, there's nothing cool about blacking out, there's nothing cool about poisoning your body with alcohol, there's nothing cool about being dehydrated and waking up with a horrific headache and nausea, there's nothing cool about becoming tangled in bullshit social drama erupting from something someone said or did when he or she was plastered....the attitude about drinking in this country needs to change.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Llama Llogophile View Post
Never been a user myself, but I’ve always supported legalization / decriminalization.

My position with regard to marijuana was further emboldened by something a paramedic friend told me: “I’ve been on hundreds of domestic abuse calls, and not one of them involved someone smoking pot and then beating up their wife.”
I have heard similar statements from the law enforcement officers I know.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:22 PM
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Actually, a majority of Republicans support marijuana legalization.

I think the main factors driving the change are 1. All the relentless carping about nanny states and oppressive regulations just does not jibe with pot prohibition and 2. To defend pot's status as a schedule I drug requires a policymaker to either be ignorant to the point of illiterate or else a shameless liar. People are getting sick of such obvious bullshit.
In many ways, it is just an "obvious" thing. To be on Schedule 1 a drug has to have no possible medical use. The common knowledge that pot can help with glaucoma and cancer treatment nausea is decades old now.

It's all too easy to say it's all partisanship but there are other, sometimes stronger, drivers of opinion. It would be easy for me to say that if you choose to be Republican that means I have to also choose to oppose marijuana and say gay marriage. To do that, I have to ignore that 40% of Republicans favor it.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:59 PM
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I think the turning point for me was when I saw the medicinal uses were not limited to the "holistic medicine" crowd.

I used to think pot was a purely recreational drug and if it disappeared from the face of the earth, we still have beer. Now I see that it serves a medial role that cannot be easily or cheaply filled by anything else.

I used to do a lot of pot when I was in college but I stopped almost as soon as I graduated. Most of my friend stopped and the ones that didn't were going to abuse something, whether it was pot or alcohol.
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Old 08-10-2018, 03:03 PM
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Only 17% of Boomers supported legalization in 1990, that has increased to 56% today. It could be because they had much younger children back then, and being notorious helicopter parents, were terrified their children might repeat what young folks were doing in the 1960s-1970s. Maybe since they've moved on to opiates and lord knows what else, they realized weed is not actually all that bad.
Or maybe as they got older and faced health challenges they realized they might benefit from medical marijuana. Many, many people are unempatheic about other peoples’ problems until it happens to them or someone they care about.
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Old 08-10-2018, 03:11 PM
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For me, at least, it was just more information being available, including that which fought misinformation. It being less dangerous and far less addictive than drinking really meant a lot to me. Plus it seemed that, despite being illegal, tons of people use it anyways, and to no real ill effect. It also helps that the world seems shittier and thus I see more reason that people might want to drink or smoke pot to take a break.

Nothing about any of that seem special to me, so I wouldn't be surprised if it's the same for others. Though I do also want to add one more thing for me: the connection between why marijuana was scheduled like it was and racism, and that, even to this day, there's disproportionate enforcement against black people.

That may be a liberal reason to support it, but my experience is that liberals tended to support it without all that. And conservatives tend to ignore or disagree with that shit.
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Old 08-10-2018, 04:15 PM
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Plus it seemed that, despite being illegal, tons of people use it anyways, and to no real ill effect.
This was a factor for me too. I think that's why I stopped really thinking about it all that much. I knew people who did it, and they were perfectly fine people on or off marijuana. Not that I ever believed in reefer madness, but it is like many other things. We fear what we don't know or understand, and with familiarity comes comfort and acceptance. That's why the gay people (especially famous people) who came out early are so important and brave. Them coming out, and letting the world see that, yeah, people you like and admire are gay, and so being gay is not a big deal.

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Old 08-10-2018, 04:28 PM
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The change began when we reached the point that more than 50% of the population had either used it themselves with little or no ill effects or personally knew others that had used with little or no ill effects. Once the lie of marijuana being ultra-harmful was known and acknowledged as a lie, it was just a matter of actually changing the laws. Inertia is a powerful force, tho, so it's taking a bit (which is fine: let the process play out, eh).
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Old 08-10-2018, 04:30 PM
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Gone are the days when we chose political affiliation based on our beliefs. Now we choose our beliefs based on our political affiliation. And marijuana legalization has become one of the things you're supposed to support if you are a Democrat / Liberal.
I agree with your 1st point to some extent, but I think there are a couple of twists when it comes to marijuana. I can imagine what they saw as drug-fueled depravity in the 60s is one reason why some people became conservatives in the 1st place, but then again many conservatives continued to oppose legalization because they saw it as "liberal".

But nowadays there are some conservative who--with uncharacteristic consistency--support legalization to be in keeping with their libertarian beliefs.
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Old 08-10-2018, 04:47 PM
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Gone are the days when we chose political affiliation based on our beliefs. Now we choose our beliefs based on our political affiliation.
If you think this is new, you're blind. Or maybe you can explain the Religious Right falling in line behind the deficit hawks, as if Jesus cared about national deficits.
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Old 08-10-2018, 04:57 PM
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I think that reasonable people may be responding to observable decades long evidence that they have been fed loads of refer madness bullshit about May Jane's harmfulness, and can see that imprisoning otherwise lawful and threatless citizens is barbaric and counterproductive, and further recognizing that we could be making shitloads of money from the legal sales of it.
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Old 08-10-2018, 05:04 PM
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Is it just me or is "we could be making shitloads of money from the legal sales of it" a terrible reason to legalize a drug? Even if that drug were plain pure water?
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Old 08-10-2018, 05:05 PM
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I agree. Marijuana should be legal and tax-free.
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Old 08-10-2018, 05:11 PM
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Is it just me or is "we could be making shitloads of money from the legal sales of it" a terrible reason to legalize a drug? Even if that drug were plain pure water?
If it's the only reason, sure I'd agree.
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Old 08-10-2018, 05:15 PM
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I agree. Marijuana should be legal and tax-free.
In my dream hippie world it would be just like growing tomatoes in the back yard and handing a few over the fence to the neighbor- no one would give a shit. But I live in Illinois, and realistically the only way it would ever be legalized is if the state was gonna make big bucks off of it. And that's a compromise I could live with.
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Old 08-10-2018, 06:06 PM
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Is it just me or is "we could be making shitloads of money from the legal sales of it" a terrible reason to legalize a drug? Even if that drug were plain pure water?
If water was illegal, I probably wouldn't get too hung up on the details.

But it's not actually a terrible reason. Within some limits, taking something from the black market and putting it into the regular economy is a good thing in a well functioning society.

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Old 08-10-2018, 06:24 PM
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How much overlap is there between the opposition/change in support for pot legalization and the opposition/change in support for gay marriage?
Exactly 100%. It's reason overcoming superstition, plain and simple. Nothing else is really involved, though of course other things do happen at the same time.
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:08 PM
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I generally agree with you all, but when I was younger and tried it, a couple of times I got paranoid as hell. If I didn't have someone there to get me through, I don't know what would have happened.

What caused that? All I hear is how wonderful it is.
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:36 PM
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What caused that? All I hear is how wonderful it is.
The main active ingredient, THC, is a stimulant and a psychedelic. A low dose of stimulant is unlikely to cause paranoia but even a light dose of psychedelics can strongly amplify negative emotions and thoughts. You were probably feeling apprehensive at the prospect of using pot and that anxiety fed on itself in a self-reinforcing loop.

It's not all wonderful and it's not for everyone. A thread about the realistic liabilities of pot might actually be interesting.

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Old 08-10-2018, 07:50 PM
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In my dream hippie world it would be just like growing tomatoes in the back yard and handing a few over the fence to the neighbor- no one would give a shit. But I live in Illinois, and realistically the only way it would ever be legalized is if the state was gonna make big bucks off of it. And that's a compromise I could live with.
Pretty much all I thought was necessary too. The compromise isn't awful, and better than continuing the demonstrated weed philosophy that has cost society so much.
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Old 08-10-2018, 08:35 PM
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The main active ingredient, THC, is a stimulant and a psychedelic. A low dose of stimulant is unlikely to cause paranoia but even a light dose of psychedelics can strongly amplify negative emotions and thoughts. You were probably feeling apprehensive at the prospect of using pot and that anxiety fed on itself in a self-reinforcing loop.
Yeah, it only enhances whatever feelings are already there. It doesn't just magically take bad feelings and turn them into good ones. And yeah, it can create paranoia. I never smoke if I'm feeling shitty. I know it'll just make me feel shittier. I know people for whom it doesn't have this effect though; they will smoke no matter what their current situation is, no matter what trouble is going on in their lives....I just can't do that. But different people are different. Also, different kinds of weed are different.

I am positive that if weed had been legal for the past 20-odd years, scientists would have figured out ways by now of tailoring the effects of different strains of weed very very specifically, so that you can know with virtual certainty exactly what kind of effects any given variety of it will produce. But since it hasn't been legal and so it can't be studied properly, this isn't possible. I do think it will happen within the next few decades though.
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Old 08-10-2018, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by WillFarnaby View Post
Only 17% of Boomers supported legalization in 1990, that has increased to 56% today. It could be because they had much younger children back then, and being notorious helicopter parents, were terrified their children might repeat what young folks were doing in the 1960s-1970s. Maybe since they've moved on to opiates and lord knows what else, they realized weed is not actually all that bad.

Millennials have also increased their support from 34% in 2006 to 71% today. Many of them were probably still under the fog of government propaganda and socialized education in general in 2006. Much of what the Boomers told them does not jive with their life experience, and therefore they reject these old Puritan ideas.

One factor has to be the depiction of marijuana use in pop culture. It has changed quite a bit.


http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank...inues-to-rise/
Quote:
Originally Posted by Llama Llogophile View Post
Never been a user myself, but I’ve always supported legalization / decriminalization.

My position with regard to marijuana was further emboldened by something a paramedic friend told me: “I’ve been on hundreds of domestic abuse calls, and not one of them involved someone smoking pot and then beating up their wife.”
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Originally Posted by nelliebly View Post
Another factor: state excise taxes and the prospect of that money going toward schools or public health programs or treatment centers. Washington state has a 37% excise tax on marijuana sales and collected $730 million last year. I think a lot of people decided if so many people were going to smoke it anyway, the state might as well get some money off it to support good causes.
See, if there was a 'like' button, I would have it it several times, but theses three point out to me that the support for decriminalization/legalization is a multifaceted answer. Personally, the Rockefeller Drug Laws in NY State are the most archaic laws in NY (IMHO, no cite) as they have destroyed the lives of many non-violent people...as our society gets more permissive (some for the good, some for the bad), I think we Boomers are looking at the issue as not being a big deal...I'm not sure I agree with legalization of everything, but marijuana is not an issue...again, JMHO...
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Old 08-10-2018, 09:55 PM
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I generally agree with you all, but when I was younger and tried it, a couple of times I got paranoid as hell. If I didn't have someone there to get me through, I don't know what would have happened.

What caused that? All I hear is how wonderful it is.
Well that is one of the arguments that the ones opposing legalization do use, but it is not convincing when one looks at the big picture.

(Relevant Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshel short animated video)

3 Arguments Why Marijuana Should Stay Illegal Reviewed
Quote:
The main active ingredient of marijuana is THC, and there's strong evidence that THC is related to psychosis regardless of other risk factors.

Marijuana also contains a substance called CBD, that seems to counteract its effect. It's even being tested as a treatment against psychosis and anxiety. But because it doesn't make you high, growers have gradually decreased the amount of CBD in marijuana over the last few decades, while increasing THC levels.

Sample testing showed that THC levels have risen from around 4% in the 1990s to nearly 12% in 2014, shifting the ratio of THC to CBD from 1:14 in 1995 to about 1:80 in 2014. It's unclear how precise those tests were, however.

Overall, recent findings suggest that the more marijuana you consume, and the stronger it is, the higher your risk of developing psychosis. But how high is the risk of psychosis for the general population? A study from Britain found that while marijuana use has risen significantly between 1996 and 2005, the number of schizophrenia cases – a type of psychosis – remain stable.

The risk of marijuana induced psychosis remains the highest for people who already have a high risk of psychosis to begin with. For them, it seems more likely that marijuana speeds up the development of their condition, rather than causing it, as far as we know right now. So the reasoning goes, if fewer people have access to marijuana, the lower the risk of marijuana induce psychosis. But actually, you could argue that precisely because marijuana is illegal, more people will end up with psychosis.

Prohibition makes illegal drug stronger and more potent.
  #41  
Old 08-10-2018, 11:25 PM
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Popular culture, in the form of movies and tv, certainly played a part in changing the laws. Among stoners there is a popular movie called Reefer Madness which is an over the top portrayal of marijuana use from the 1930’s: except it was meant to be sincere, and was subtitled “warm your kids”. In the 1950’s, TV detectives on Dragnet demonized reefer. By the 70s and 80s, though, we had Cheech and Chong and funny guys like Spicoli. By the 1990s, you got joking references in sitcoms.

Now, it is true that there was some break in popular consumption when more people were exposed to “grass” in the 60s and 70s, but it seems to me that pop culture references reached far more people than actually used weed. Yet that saturation surely resulted in the perception that pot was less serious than earlier generations believed, until criminalizing it starts to seem increasingly absurd.

Last edited by Moriarty; 08-10-2018 at 11:26 PM.
  #42  
Old 08-11-2018, 02:25 AM
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I agree. Marijuana should be legal and tax-free.
Marijuana does have a social cost, so taxing it is reasonable. Nowhere near the social cost of keeping it illegal, of course.
  #43  
Old 08-11-2018, 02:27 AM
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I agree with your 1st point to some extent, but I think there are a couple of twists when it comes to marijuana. I can imagine what they saw as drug-fueled depravity in the 60s is one reason why some people became conservatives in the 1st place, but then again many conservatives continued to oppose legalization because they saw it as "liberal".

But nowadays there are some conservative who--with uncharacteristic consistency--support legalization to be in keeping with their libertarian beliefs.
I wonder how the right breaks down about this. My guess would be that the libertarian right supports legalization, but the religious right does not.
  #44  
Old 08-11-2018, 07:18 AM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
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I wonder how the right breaks down about this. My guess would be that the libertarian right supports legalization, but the religious right does not.
Whichever way that has happened, I think it's clear that - in general - public opinion long ago passed some kind of tipping point on the subject of marijuana, and legalization is merely a question of when and of cleaning up some details.
  #45  
Old 08-11-2018, 08:16 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Two big factors:

1) publicity about marijuana being a sort of wonder drug - heavily overblown, but valuable for eliminating resistance to legalization. People don't want to be seen as cruel to kids with seizure disorders or cancer patients.

2) lots of potential $$$ for governments needing dough to keep their budgets afloat. It's like the effect the Depression had on booze legalization - officials badly needed alcohol tax revenue so they became less resistant to overturning Prohibition.

I find it comical to suggest that Boomers dying off is a significant factor, as that "generation" is associated strongly with a much larger percentage of dopeheads than ever before.
  #46  
Old 08-11-2018, 08:35 AM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is online now
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Originally Posted by Lamoral View Post
it only enhances whatever feelings are already there.
Although sometimes one might be surprised (or in denial) about what's already there.



Quote:
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I never smoke if I'm feeling shitty. I know it'll just make me feel shittier.
That has the potential to be useful if combined with meditation and introspective exploration. Unpleasant and not at all recreational but useful.



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Originally Posted by Lamoral View Post
I am positive that if weed had been legal for the past 20-odd years, scientists would have figured out ways by now of tailoring the effects of different strains of weed very very specifically, so that you can know with virtual certainty exactly what kind of effects any given variety of it will produce.

To an extent, that's already happening. If you prefer the calming effects of pot, you can get CBD oil with little/no THC and if you prefer the invigorating effects of pot, you can get sativa shatter with 80% THC content and presumably little/no CBD. As the market grows and matures, you'll get more professional, organized and capitalized producers who'll invest in R&D. A possible risk is that those scientists will be tasked with coming up with versions of pot which are more addiction-prone, much like tobacco scientists were.

Insofar as psychedelic effects are concerned, I'm not sure it'll ever be possible to know with virtual exactly what effects any given variety will produce. Their effects on the mind seem to be analogous to relaxed stability in aerodynamics: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relaxed_stability
  #47  
Old 08-11-2018, 08:44 AM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
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... I'm not sure it'll ever be possible to know with virtual exactly ...
(emphasis mine of course)

I know it's just a typo, and I want to note that I agree with and like what you were actually saying, but... I love this new phrase! Alexander Haig lives on!
  #48  
Old 08-11-2018, 08:48 AM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is online now
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Yeah, if I ever feel like changing my username, I know what I'll pick.
  #49  
Old 08-11-2018, 08:50 AM
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I find it comical to suggest that Boomers dying off is a significant factor, as that "generation" is associated strongly with a much larger percentage of dopeheads than ever before.
I think a factor is the pre-boomers dying off. Boomers are largely still alive and in their prime voting years. But even if the Boomers were 45% in favor of legalization versus 20% for pre-boomer (for example), and the successor generations are 55%, public policy can swing toward legalization when the Boomers die off even though the biggest shift occurred with the Boomers.

Last edited by Ludovic; 08-11-2018 at 08:50 AM.
  #50  
Old 08-11-2018, 09:25 AM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
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Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
I find it comical to suggest that Boomers dying off is a significant factor, as that "generation" is associated strongly with a much larger percentage of dopeheads than ever before.
Someone else already commented with this idea, but mine is simpler: "a much larger percentage" doesn't necessarily mean "over 50%", or "enough to tip the balance whatever enough is".
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