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Old 08-11-2018, 01:35 PM
wolly wolly is offline
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I want to be an engineer but I hate physics

I tried understanding most of the concepts about electricity,thermodynamics,mechanics and most of them were easier to understand but the rest not so easy.Is that possible?I tried solving every problem but the problem was that I couldn't understand what the formulas meant and I memorized each of them.Is that what engineering means?Memorizing formulas without the ability to see what they do?I mean math to me is a piece of cake but when it comes to describe some phenomens or whatever they are called I just can't grasp these theorems and everything complex in electrostatics,electrodynamics,forces in body diagrams and even these chapters in AC about coils,capacitor,etc.
What do you think?Am I suited for this career?
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:40 PM
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Okay, I'll bite:

Why do you want to be an engineer? What is it about engineering that appeals to you?
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:41 PM
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There are plenty of engineering fields that don't involve physics, such as software engineering and systems engineering. What do you think of chemistry?

If you don't like physics, why are you interested in engineering?
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:43 PM
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Why do you want to be an engineer? Do you have to decide now? Where are you in your scholastic career?

General rule is that you are suited for whatever excites your interests. If you're passionate about something then you'll do the work to rise to the peak of your abilities. If you can't see yourself doing the work then it might be wise to explore your motivations and your options.
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:47 PM
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Also I had some C grades in physics(12th grade is the class where I got Cs and Fs).Sorry for not mentioning that.
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:49 PM
wolly wolly is offline
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Okay, I'll bite:

Why do you want to be an engineer? What is it about engineering that appeals to you?
Well I like the fact that in naval engineering you can become a ship captain and explore the world.I always liked that.
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:53 PM
wolly wolly is offline
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Originally Posted by Sefton View Post
There are plenty of engineering fields that don't involve physics, such as software engineering and systems engineering. What do you think of chemistry?

If you don't like physics, why are you interested in engineering?
For the fact that you can build things and explore the world?I always wanted how an engineer thinks in difficult situations whatever if it's about engines,electrical machines,mechanical machines etc.
I just don't know if an engineer is passionate about physics in general.Why?Can't you use math?

Last edited by wolly; 08-11-2018 at 01:54 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:55 PM
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Well I like the fact that in naval engineering you can become a ship captain and explore the world.I always liked that.
You can explore the world by joining the Navy as an enlisted crew member also. No engineering certification required.

Do you want to explore the world or do you want to be an engineer? Either one of these may or may not be true but they are not dependent on one another.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:08 PM
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I tried solving every problem but the problem was that I couldn't understand what the formulas meant and I memorized each of them.Is that what engineering means?Memorizing formulas without the ability to see what they do?
I would say learning engineering is the opposite of this. A good engineer needs to understand what is going on, and what is needed. I recall one exam where the prof told us no cheat sheets or open books were allowed, he would provide all the equations we needed.

Then he turned to the white board and wrote, F=MA. He wanted us to derive any other equations from that. He certainly could do it.

While there are certainly interesting jobs in the field, I would say not to expect to travel the world. Many engineering jobs are very detailed work in a small area of expertise. Some one has to design all those beams, gear trains and stressed members.

If you can get into the research field like I did, it can be quite rewarding and interesting.

Dennis
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:13 PM
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You can explore the world by joining the Navy as an enlisted crew member also. No engineering certification required.

Do you want to explore the world or do you want to be an engineer? Either one of these may or may not be true but they are not dependent on one another.
It's just that as a sailor you need good sight....I have myopia and I can't see from 5-10 meters.
As a ship captain,that's another story...Anyway if you think that I'm not suited for both I guess I should try a trade career.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:17 PM
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General rule is that you are suited for whatever excites your interests. If you're passionate about something then you'll do the work to rise to the peak of your abilities. If you can't see yourself doing the work then it might be wise to explore your motivations and your options.
This.

I'm an engineer. And work with lots and lots of other engineers.

It's very obvious that many of the engineers I work with hate engineering. I am guessing the only reason they went into engineering is because of the reputation of "good pay" and "good job prospects." As a result, they tend to be sad and bitter people who can't wait to retire. I find it rather pathetic.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:20 PM
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If your total exposure to physics is a class or two in high school, it's a little too early to decide you hate it. Did you have a good teacher?

It's easier to switch from an engineering major to another field than the other was around. I'd give it a semester or a year. Try to find the GOOD physics teacher or find/invest in a good tutor.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:22 PM
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Anyway if you think that I'm not suited for both I guess I should try a trade career.
I said nothing about what careers may or may not suit you. You say you want to be an engineer, wonderful. That's a fine goal. I'm attempting to understand why you specifically want to train as an engineer.

Last edited by Alpha Twit; 08-11-2018 at 02:24 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:28 PM
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I would say learning engineering is the opposite of this. A good engineer needs to understand what is going on, and what is needed. I recall one exam where the prof told us no cheat sheets or open books were allowed, he would provide all the equations we needed.

Then he turned to the white board and wrote, F=MA. He wanted us to derive any other equations from that. He certainly could do it.
That's so funny, because I always told folks never to sweat physics tests. Just write F=ma at the top of the page, and it would be smooth sailing from there on. I was only half joking, and I was talking about Freshman Physics, of course.

As for the OP, it will be tough getting in engineering if you aren't good at math. Someone suggested software engineering, so that might be worth looking into.

Last edited by John Mace; 08-11-2018 at 02:29 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:29 PM
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ask fairy chat mom she was a engineer in the navy for like 20 years or so ……..
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:58 PM
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Did you have a good teacher?
No.My highschool physics teacher was a dumbass.He made fun of us and he told us that we are parallel with physics.He literally told us that we are stupid at physics.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:04 PM
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As for the OP, it will be tough getting in engineering if you aren't good at math.
I have no problem with the math.Actually I was pretty decent at math.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:06 PM
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Regardless of what field you go into, you will go further if you remember to put a space after a period or comma.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:09 PM
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Regardless of what field you go into, you will go further if you remember to put a space after a period or comma.
Sorry,I'm not so experienced with grammar and neither with the syntax of it. I know a few things but I have no idea how to use all the verbs,adjectives,etc.

Last edited by wolly; 08-11-2018 at 03:09 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:28 PM
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Well, in that respect at least, you'll do fine in engineering. (Many of the people I've worked with have horrible language skills.) But at least for mechanical, electrical or chemical engineering, you need to understand the physics.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:33 PM
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You are not supposed to memorize the formulas. You are supposed to understand the formulas. If you didn't learn what they mean, either you had a lousy teacher (very possible) or you just don't have the right type of intelligence (also possible). If you can get into a decent engineering school, it won't take long to find out if you have the aptitude you need. And if you don't, you can always switch to a business major and make twice as much money in the long run.

Also, don't sell short the importance of good communication skills. Yes, you can survive as a low-level button-pusher with no communications skills, but the excellent writers and speakers are the ones that go far in the engineering world.
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Old 08-11-2018, 03:55 PM
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Well I took my physics IB and I received a 57,50 and in math 72,00.Are these good grades for engineering?
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:52 PM
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Forgot to mention that I graduated highschool. Sorry for that part. I should have written that in my first post.
  #24  
Old 08-11-2018, 05:19 PM
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Regardless of what field you go into, you will go further if you remember to put a space after a period or comma.
Meh. We engineers are notorious for bad spelling and grammar. You're lucky if you get a coherent sentence out of us. Lack of proper punctuation use is definitely not an impediment to an engineering career.
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Old 08-11-2018, 05:41 PM
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There are plenty of engineering fields that don't involve physics, such as software engineering and systems engineering. What do you think of chemistry?

If you don't like physics, why are you interested in engineering?
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Sorry,I'm not so experienced with grammar and neither with the syntax of it. I know a few things but I have no idea how to use all the verbs,adjectives,etc.
Chemical engineering major chiming in. As a chemE, I endured two years of physics for engineers (i.e. calculus based physics) in college. Then, there are classes of thermodynamics and transport phenomena, which draw heavily from physics. So, chemistry won't save an engineer from physics.

Electrical engineering might get you away from the mechanical elements of engineering, but it will hardly get you away from the formulae. V=IR and all that jazz. But you have to deal with the right hand rule which is so much bullshit.

Engineering isn't about remembering a formula. It's about solving a problem. Life is open book. It's not an absolute requirement that I remember that PV=nRT, but it's awfully convenient. It's even more convenient that (PV/T)1=(PV/T)2 (so much subtext is lost on the Internet), which is derived from PV=nRT. It's even more convenient to remember 22.4 mol/L at 0C and 1 atm, and that I can scale that based on temperature and pressure.

I do a job I didn't even know existed in college. Engineering taught me the skills to learn the skills I have now.

And no matter what you learn as far as technical skills go, you'll need to be able to communicate them. It's an overlooked element by many engineers entering the field, but the most successful engineers and scientists I know aren't the most technically gifted. They're the ones who grasp the technical elements but are great at communicating them.
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Old 08-11-2018, 05:43 PM
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Meh. We engineers are notorious for bad spelling and grammar. You're lucky if you get a coherent sentence out of us. Lack of proper punctuation use is definitely not an impediment to an engineering career.
Arg! No! Technical communication is important. If I can't write a letter explaining why my project is important and why it's allowable under the regulations, I haven't done my job, technical profieiency be damned.
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Old 08-11-2018, 05:48 PM
F. U. Shakespeare F. U. Shakespeare is offline
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I've been an electrical engineer for 30+ years.

My situation was similar to yours: due to bad/non-existent math instruction, I got off the math and science track in junior high school. After graduating high school and working minimum wage jobs for a few years, I became interested in electrical engineering, having developed an interest in audio systems and the electric guitar. College classes in math and physics were difficult for me, because I hadn't seen them in high school, and thought I was poorer at them than I eventually turned out to be.

Not all engineers were physics whizzes in college. But you have to develop a working knowledge of the principles required for your chosen field. All engineering majors had to take two semester of mechanical engineering (statics and dynamics), but I only learned enough to pass them. I ended up concentrating on radio frequency engineering, so a command of electromagnetics principles was essential. But after graduating and getting a job, it was rare that I had to do the detailed math that I did in college. Working as an engineer often involves more practical knowledge and problem solving than advanced math and physics.

I would recommend doubling back and studying subjects that you're unsure about your capabilities with. Is auditing college classes an option? Do you have the discipline to study on your own? Repeat exposure helps. Brush up on math as well - you need strong math skills to do well at physics.

Find out if you can develop the necessary working knowledge.

As others have mentioned, some engineering disciplines require less math and physics than others. In addition to computer and system engineering, there's industrial engineering.

And I also concur that for an engineer, no skills are more important the simple ability to communicate clearly (even if your spelling, punctuation, etc. aren't perfect).

Last edited by F. U. Shakespeare; 08-11-2018 at 05:51 PM.
  #28  
Old 08-11-2018, 06:59 PM
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Arg! No! Technical communication is important. If I can't write a letter explaining why my project is important and why it's allowable under the regulations, I haven't done my job, technical profieiency be damned.
You guys are not disagreeing. Communication is important in engineering, but lots of engineers are very bad at it. I know - I've done lots of editing. And it has gotten worse.
Ditto for speaking. At the engineering conference I'm involved with we enforce good slides by changing them if necessary. We can't do anything about boring and lousy speakers though. Which is frustrating.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:00 PM
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That's so funny, because I always told folks never to sweat physics tests. Just write F=ma at the top of the page, and it would be smooth sailing from there on. I was only half joking, and I was talking about Freshman Physics, of course.
Heh. When I was in college one of our friends, who was a chemist, for fun went to the Physics final - 3rd year I think. He wrote F=ma on the paper and nothing else.
He got 5%.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:03 PM
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I have no problem with the math.Actually I was pretty decent at math.
Did you take calculus in high school? That is the kind of stuff you need for many types of engineering.
My impression of naval engineering is that this involves the design of ships, not the running of ships. I may be wrong. If you want to be a ship captain wouldn't the merchant marine academy of Naval Academy be better?
Not that we'd want you docking anything with bad eyesight!

But if you go into consulting, say, you might still see more of the world than you'd think. But most of it is hotels and airports.

Last edited by Voyager; 08-11-2018 at 07:05 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:09 PM
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I have a degree in mech engineering. But physics and math come easy for me. What are the problems you are having with understanding?

Memorizing formulas is not the point of engineering or science. The point is to develop a model that captures the essence of the problem and then use mathematical techniques to solve what needs solving. The models and formulas in texts apply to the problems in the text with the constraints and assumptions listed. Understanding what and why the models are used allow you to develop the ability to create models that are relevant to the problems you need to solve.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:10 PM
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OP, have you learned calculus, yet? Physics without calculus is hard. So difficult that I think they really shouldn't even try to teach it. Once you learn the math (calculus), it becomes so much easier since you don't have to memorize the formulae, you learn the basic principles and just create any formula you need, on the spot.

For example, to convert from degrees F to degrees C, you have a formula. I have trouble memorizing it, so I don't try. I know that it involves a 1.8 (either multiplied or divided, I can't remember which) and either a + or - 32. But, I also know that a degree C is larger than a degree F and that 0 degrees C is equal to 32 degrees F. So, if I have, say 37 degrees C and want to know what the degrees F would be, I just think a moment. If it was 0 degrees C, it would be multiplied by a number (the result would be 0 since anything multiplied by 0 is 0) and then add 32. But, it's not 0, it's 37. So, since a degree C is bigger than a degree F, I have to multiply the C by 1.8 (which would make it larger). 37 x 1.8 = 66.6 and add the 32 and you get 98.6 degrees F.

You don't have to memorize the formulae if you know the principles. You have to understand the math to make it work, but if you understand the math, it isn't hard. At least for me, if I think about it enough.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:13 PM
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For the fact that you can build things and explore the world?I always wanted how an engineer thinks in difficult situations whatever if it's about engines,electrical machines,mechanical machines etc.
I just don't know if an engineer is passionate about physics in general.Why?Can't you use math?
If you really want to build things, then the suggestion of software engineering might not be for you. When I was in school computer science included both computer engineering and software engineering, and they are very different.
Some parts of engineering need more physics than others. Today if you design a circuit board, you have to worry about radiation, signal integrity, timing, noise, all of which involves physics and lots of math. Doing semiconductors is even worse.
Engineering covers a lot of ground. You should read about the different specialties and figure out what appeals.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:42 PM
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And no matter what you learn as far as technical skills go, you'll need to be able to communicate them. It's an overlooked element by many engineers entering the field, but the most successful engineers and scientists I know aren't the most technically gifted. They're the ones who grasp the technical elements but are great at communicating them.
And there is reason for that above and beyond presenting yourself well; most engineering roles involve the drafting or interpreting of requirements and specifications, which are essentially the engineering equivalent of a contract. Like contracts, the language and grammar used in these documents has to be precise so that everybody referencing them has the same understanding. A poorly written specification or the misinterpretation of a requirement can literally doom a project to failure, or worse result in a defect that can pose a hazard to property and human life. Engineering (and architecture) is one of the few jobs outside of the battlefield where a serious failure to understand or communicate can result in mass casualty; when a building collapses because someone misread a structural analysis report, or an airplane crashes because of a poorly designed latch monitoring system that didn't meet failsafe requirements. Being able to communicate clearly, accurately, and with precision is crucial to any position of responsibility in any engineering discipline, and the failure to do so can cost money, programs, and lives.

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Did you take calculus in high school? That is the kind of stuff you need for many types of engineering.
My impression of naval engineering is that this involves the design of ships, not the running of ships. I may be wrong. If you want to be a ship captain wouldn't the merchant marine academy of Naval Academy be better?
Marine engineering (or naval architecture as it is often referred to when applied specifically to the design of boats and ships) is a multidisciplinary field covering the design, modification, and operation of sea-going vessels and platforms. It certainly requires as good of a mastery of physics as mechanical and electrical engineering, and while there are no doubt opportunities for travel most marine engineers either work in an office environment doing design and analysis work, or on a platform or shipyard overseeing construction or modification.

I don't know what the scores referenced by the o.p. mean, but if he is not confident in his ability to understand basic physics he needs to either seek better teaching or consider other professions. Not all fields of engineering directly apply fundamental physics on a daily basis, but any field that involves any kind of mechanism or physical product being able to apply principles of physics to understand why things work (or don't work, as the case often is) is imperative to being successful. Not everyone can master physics and mathematics, but for many people it is more a matter of scholarship discipline and good teaching rather than not having some inherent je ne sais quoi quality. Few people really grasp physical laws without some effort, especially those that are abstract or seemingly contradict our everyday experience.

If what the o.p. wants is just to travel the world and explore, there are far more appropriate vocations for that than engineering. Many engineers I know have never left their native country, and in general tend to be of a conservative bent with little interest in other cultures or ideas beyond their native experience.

Stranger
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Old 08-11-2018, 08:55 PM
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I think wanting engineering without physics is like going to a restaurant and ordering "steak please, but make me one without meat". "Just a baked potato then?" "No, I'm tired of eating vegetables all the time, that's why I ordered a steak."

It's not like everything is physics - of course there are other aspects to engineering than just that - but... It is one of the main parts, one that will block your way quite badly if you're constantly trying to avoid it.
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Old 08-11-2018, 10:32 PM
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If what the o.p. wants is just to travel the world and explore, there are far more appropriate vocations for that than engineering. Many engineers I know have never left their native country, and in general tend to be of a conservative bent with little interest in other cultures or ideas beyond their native experience.

Stranger
Many, I'd say most, of the engineers I know had to learn a strange culture, that culture being the American one. And those of us born here were exposed to their cultures also, one of the better things about working in Silicon Valley.
But I must know a better class of engineers. It is not clear that the OP knows the difference between one field and another.
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Old 08-12-2018, 07:34 AM
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If you do a lot of physics, you'll probably end up memorizing a lot of formulas, but that's just because you're using them a lot. Memorizing formulas won't help you much, aside from saving a little time on looking them up (which real physicists still have to do occasionally, for ones that they don't use as often). As others have said, what's essential is understanding the formulas. In fact, even if you don't remember a formula, you can often re-derive it, just from understanding it.

As an example, suppose you forget the formula for centripetal acceleration. But picture yourself going around a curve in a car, and how much you get thrown around inside the car when you do it: You know that you get thrown around more when you're going fast than when you're going slow, so v must be in the numerator. And you know that you're thrown around more going around a really tight turn (with a small radius) than a gradual turn (with large radius), so r must be in the denominator. But it can't be a = v/r, because that has the wrong units: So it must be v^2/r instead. And all you have to remember now is whether there's any 1/2 or 2*pi or something in the formula, and in this case there isn't: a = v^2/r , and you're done.
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:03 AM
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I have a EE degree and while I loved physics, I still remember the day I decided I wouldn't become an engineer.

I was in my third year, and we had a communications class, there you had to calculate waves traveling through various media, with propagation and reflections et al. One Friday, three of us were in the class and the teacher have us a multistep solution to a particular type of problem. "Al" had to take off, but "Don" and I went over the material after class while it was still fresh. After that, we took off and enjoyed the weekend.

On Monday, Al came to class all excited. He had found a better solution which reduced the number of steps. It provided the same result, but was more elegant. He did admit that he spent most of Saturday and Sunday working on it.

I distinctly remember thinking that Al really needed to become an engineer and I didn't to find a different line of work. I finished my degree and later went into technical sales and marketing. That was my ideal job, I could understand the material, but just wasn't that passionate about creating the stuff myself.
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:17 AM
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Aren't there a great many US Navy sailors who are nearsighted and wear glasses?
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:46 AM
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My advice is to find some introductory lectures on engineering and watch them. e.g.

Introduction to Engineering - Oklahoma State University

EGR 10: Introduction to Engineering - full course: audio - Pratt School of Engineering

Free Online Engineering Courses - list

There's plenty of material available that will give you a good idea of what engineering is about.
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Old 08-12-2018, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by excavating (for a mind) View Post
OP, have you learned calculus, yet? Physics without calculus is hard. So difficult that I think they really shouldn't even try to teach it. Once you learn the math (calculus), it becomes so much easier since you don't have to memorize the formulae, you learn the basic principles and just create any formula you need, on the spot.
This is what I was going to say. You really can't understand many of the forumulas presented to you in HS physics until you study and understand calculus.
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:02 PM
Nava Nava is offline
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Memorizing formulas without the ability to see what they do?
That's anti-engineering. I'm part of that over-30% of my HS class who "couldn't learn stuff we couldn't understand"; over 95% of that group became engineers.

Note that you won't understand everything, or in every way. Nobody does. My 5th year Analytical Methods teacher claimed he still didn't quite understand how NMR worked - he could use it, but thinking about how it worked made his head hurt.

My written university exams always included a first part which was theory essays and a second one which was word problems. The word problems part included carrying a "formulas book" you had to prepare yourself; some teachers would collect these and count them as part of the grade (we got them back). Because you shouldn't need to memorize formulas, an engineer already invented books!

Nava, ChemE


PS: in my case, and it's the same for many of my classmates, physics and chemistry is what got math to "make sense". We were taught math as if it existed by itself, when in reality most of math has come up because people needed to solve a problem that previous math wasn't enough for. Physics was what the math had been invented for.
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Last edited by Nava; 08-12-2018 at 12:07 PM.
  #43  
Old 08-12-2018, 12:10 PM
Nava Nava is offline
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It's just that as a sailor you need good sight....I have myopia and I can't see from 5-10 meters.
Have you heard of RADAR and LIDAR? Crow's nests are soooooo last empire's navy!
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  #44  
Old 08-12-2018, 12:42 PM
betterlifethroughchemistry betterlifethroughchemistry is offline
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
PS: in my case, and it's the same for many of my classmates, physics and chemistry is what got math to "make sense". We were taught math as if it existed by itself, when in reality most of math has come up because people needed to solve a problem that previous math wasn't enough for. Physics was what the math had been invented for.
Nava FTW...my experience exactly...I understood differentials in Calc 1, I was good at math and calc, but it was just solving meaningless problems at first, then we started looking at the reaction rates, orders, and it suddenly all made sense...that followed through Calc 3 and P-Chem...we use the Arrhenius equation every day for different conditions, it's just easier as we have spreadsheets to plug the data into and create the plots...math is the language of physics, physics is the language of chemistry and chemistry is the language of biology...
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:44 PM
Nava Nava is offline
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In fact, at the micro level chemistry is basically electricity. Reactions are the tiniest currents ever Mechanics are macro-level; PV=nRT is the equation for 3D billiards .

Last edited by Nava; 08-12-2018 at 12:46 PM.
  #46  
Old 08-12-2018, 12:51 PM
betterlifethroughchemistry betterlifethroughchemistry is offline
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Life is open book.
Emphasis mine - EXACTLY what we tell every young chemist we hire - you've proven you can pass the class, that's nice, gold star, now we have to produce materials, solve problems and make money for the company, you have all the resources you can find (including us old folk) at your disposal...
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:59 PM
betterlifethroughchemistry betterlifethroughchemistry is offline
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In fact, at the micro level chemistry is basically electricity. Reactions are the tiniest currents ever Mechanics are macro-level; PV=nRT is the equation for 3D billiards .
Yeah...I love this stuff...my first Organic teacher always told us, if you want to find out the reaction product, push some electrons around, that always made sense to me, you don't have to know the product of every possible reaction, you just need to recognize the character of the reactants, the reaction conditions and push around some electrons...I know it's simplistic, but it's a great place to start and a good way to teach people the thought process involved...
  #48  
Old 08-12-2018, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
That's anti-engineering. I'm part of that over-30% of my HS class who "couldn't learn stuff we couldn't understand"; over 95% of that group became engineers.

Note that you won't understand everything, or in every way. Nobody does. My 5th year Analytical Methods teacher claimed he still didn't quite understand how NMR worked - he could use it, but thinking about how it worked made his head hurt.

My written university exams always included a first part which was theory essays and a second one which was word problems. The word problems part included carrying a "formulas book" you had to prepare yourself; some teachers would collect these and count them as part of the grade (we got them back). Because you shouldn't need to memorize formulas, an engineer already invented books!

Nava, ChemE
At MIT we were allowed to bring a sheet of paper with us to exams where we could write all the formulas. Memorizing them is not important - knowing when and how to apply them is.
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Old 08-12-2018, 03:12 PM
Mr. Bill Mr. Bill is offline
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Well I like the fact that in naval engineering you can become a ship captain and explore the world.I always liked that.
It seems to me that you should be looking at one of the maritime academies.

You could study engineering there, although I think it would be pretty focused on practical applications for shipboard use.

My father went to a maritime academy and got a degree in Marine Engineering, which basically qualified him to run the engines on a ship. He got a job on a freighter, making runs to South America and back. Then he got drafted, spent a couple of years in the Army, got married and went looking for a shore-side job.

If you find that engineering doesn't suit you, the maritime academies have other courses of study, including ones that will put you on a command track.
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Old 08-12-2018, 04:47 PM
wolly wolly is offline
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Also why do you need programming languages in naval engineering?Do they help you with something?
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