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Old 08-18-2018, 12:08 AM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
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Great Movies that Betrayed Their Source Material

I'm in the middle of an "Idris Elba as Bond" discussion elsewhere. I think a great movie about a British spy could be made starring Elba, but he shouldn't play that one particular spy because when you drift too far from the source material, it stops being that character. I don't hold James Bond up as great literature or anything, I think Bond is a great character by a terrible writer, like Tarzan or Conan the Barbarian. Still, making him black or gay or American (which has, I know, actually been done) is a betrayal of the source material.

Bur is that such a bad thing? Some really great movies have been betrayals of their source material and were actually better for it. A Clockcwork Orange and The Shining reportedly didn't please the respective authors, I'm told. And Starship Troopers reduced some themes Heinlein took very seriously to punchlines, though I'm not very bothered by it. A literal adaptation of Frankenstein is likely impossible, but John Whale's film is beautiful.

What are some other great films that took unforgivable liberties with their source novels?
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Old 08-18-2018, 12:19 AM
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Starship Troopers was not a great movie; it was an idiotic strawman attack upon its source material.
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Old 08-18-2018, 12:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop View Post
And Starship Troopers reduced some themes Heinlein took very seriously to punchlines, though I'm not very bothered by it.
Bear in mind that the Starship Troopers film had a screenplay which had nothing whatsoever to do with the Heinlein novel, but then had the name, and some superficial aspects from the novel, bolted on. In addition, the director, Paul Verhoeven, didn't even finish reading the novel, complaining that it made him "bored and depressed."

Last edited by kenobi 65; 08-18-2018 at 12:52 AM.
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Old 08-18-2018, 01:48 AM
Lorne Armstrong Lorne Armstrong is offline
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Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop View Post
I'm in the middle of an "Idris Elba as Bond" discussion elsewhere. I think a great movie about a British spy could be made starring Elba, but he shouldn't play that one particular spy because when you drift too far from the source material, it stops being that character. I don't hold James Bond up as great literature or anything, I think Bond is a great character by a terrible writer, like Tarzan or Conan the Barbarian. Still, making him black or gay or American (which has, I know, actually been done) is a betrayal of the source material.

Bur is that such a bad thing? Some really great movies have been betrayals of their source material and were actually better for it. A Clockcwork Orange and The Shining reportedly didn't please the respective authors, I'm told. And Starship Troopers reduced some themes Heinlein took very seriously to punchlines, though I'm not very bothered by it. A literal adaptation of Frankenstein is likely impossible, but John Whale's film is beautiful.

What are some other great films that took unforgivable liberties with their source novels?
I'm not sure why The Shining is considered such a classic. I really enjoyed the novel. I think it was far superior to the film.
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Old 08-18-2018, 06:57 AM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
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I guess it would be very tricky to come up with a coherent and fair definition of "unforgivable" specific to this context.

One thing I'm "on the fence" about is when a movie "works" and is considered a good movie but to me doesn't seem faithful to the intent of the text. To me, the Lord of the Rings movies fit that description. People obviously liked the movies enough to continue watching, but to me anyway they just didn't tell the story. (A story, sure, but not Tolkien's story.)

But calling a movie "Selected Action Scenes from The Lord of the Rings Plus Some Other Stuff" doesn't please Marketing.

Last edited by DavidwithanR; 08-18-2018 at 06:59 AM.
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Old 08-18-2018, 07:15 AM
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I'm not sure why The Shining is considered such a classic. I really enjoyed the novel. I think it was far superior to the film.
Stephen King didn't like the choice of Jack Nicholson for the lead. He said something like the casting of Nicholson essentially foreshadows that the character is going to go crazy. King wanted someone who seemed stable-- almost boring-- so when he goes off the wall, it's a shock. His choice for the role was Michael Moriarty, the guy who played Ben Stone, the original ADA on Law & Order. I think that would have been great.


My nomination for a great movie that betrayed its source material is The Wizard of Oz, yes, the big MGM musical with Judy Garland. The reason is that the film has the tacked on moral "There's no place like home," and that whole speech Dorothy has about looking for happiness no further than her own back yard.

In the book, there's a preface by Baum, where he states without qualification, that his intent was to write a book for children with no moralizing, no lesson, just something enjoyable. He thought there was enough didactics in children's literature, and he wanted to write something that was just for fun. So sticking a moral on the story absolutely betrayed the source material.
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Old 08-18-2018, 07:21 AM
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(A story, sure, but not Tolkien's story.)
I think that happens a lot with movies, things are changed from the source material. Carrie the Sissy Spacek movie was very different from the book. They made her much easier to feel sympathetic towards. (there was a later (tv?) version that stuck more to the book)
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Old 08-18-2018, 07:28 AM
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Many screenwriters and directors find their source material too boring and add in a love story that didn't appear in the original. I would say all of those, regardless of their skill or success, have betrayed their source.
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Old 08-18-2018, 07:40 AM
Mr. Bill Mr. Bill is offline
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I'm in the middle of an "Idris Elba as Bond" discussion elsewhere. I think a great movie about a British spy could be made starring Elba, but he shouldn't play that one particular spy because when you drift too far from the source material, it stops being that character. I don't hold James Bond up as great literature or anything, I think Bond is a great character by a terrible writer, like Tarzan or Conan the Barbarian. Still, making him black or gay or American (which has, I know, actually been done) is a betrayal of the source material.

Bur is that such a bad thing? Some really great movies have been betrayals of their source material and were actually better for it. A Clockcwork Orange and The Shining reportedly didn't please the respective authors, I'm told. And Starship Troopers reduced some themes Heinlein took very seriously to punchlines, though I'm not very bothered by it. A literal adaptation of Frankenstein is likely impossible, but John Whale's film is beautiful.

What are some other great films that took unforgivable liberties with their source novels?
I'm OK with Bond being black, as long as it's a British black. But I agree he should not be gay, as Bond's extremely active heterosexuality is an integral part of the character.

Besides, Bond is an archetype. He is what every man secretly (or not so secretly) wants to be - comfortable in all settings, from the dockyards to the casinos at Monte Carlo, deadly in a fight with whatever weapons, extremely successful with the ladies (and apparently very well endowed to boot), and something of a maverick.

Nothing homophobic intended, but I don't think every man secretly wants to be gay.

For the same reason, I don't think Bond should be female, as has also been suggested.

As far as movies that betray their source material, I will offer most movies made from Tom Clancy novels.

The best example is Clear And Present Danger, where the story was only about 10% Clancy with the rest being made up by the screenwriters. But the worst part was the alteration of the characters, particularly that of John Clark. In Clancy's writing, Clark is a long-time field operative of the CIA, specializing in dangerous missions such as infiltrating the Soviet Union to extract agents in danger. He is also an extremely patriotic American. In the movie he is made to be some kind of nation-less mercenary. I challenge anyone to explain to me how that makes the story better.
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:48 AM
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Dr. Strangelove was loosely based on the novel Red Alert, which was a serious thriller and not a satire.
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:50 AM
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Shawshank Redemption. The novella was marvelous, with a very ambiguous ending. The movie had a much different ending, and it was a masterpiece.
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Old 08-18-2018, 09:04 AM
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Stephen King didn't like the choice of Jack Nicholson for the lead. He said something like the casting of Nicholson essentially foreshadows that the character is going to go crazy.
Especially when he's creepy even in the early part of the movie.

I liked both the movie and the novel, which were excellent in their separate ways.

Bridge On The River Kwai "betrayed" the novel which had a far different ending. Still a terrific movie.

*if you're going to criticize casting, a worse offense than having Nicholson playing a lead, was getting to play Shelley Duvall to star as his goofy childlike wife, which strained credulity from the start.

Last edited by Jackmannii; 08-18-2018 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 08-18-2018, 09:08 AM
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I'm OK with Bond being black, as long as it's a British black. But I agree he should not be gay, as Bond's extremely active heterosexuality is an integral part of the character.

<snip>

For the same reason, I don't think Bond should be female, as has also been suggested.
Fine, then let the writer write a screenplay about a black, lesbian British superspy; just don't call her Bond. Hell, I'd watch it just for the curiosity factor.

Or are they afraid their writing won't be up to snuff and needs the boost of an established franchise to be successful?

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Bear in mind that the Starship Troopers film had a screenplay which had nothing whatsoever to do with the Heinlein novel, but then had the name, and some superficial aspects from the novel, bolted on. In addition, the director, Paul Verhoeven, didn't even finish reading the novel, complaining that it made him "bored and depressed."
Same argument. If you don't want to make a Starship Troopers that bears some resemblance to one of the most-read works of science-fiction ever, then go ahead and make your own movie -- but call it Bug Hunt, or something.
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Old 08-18-2018, 09:30 AM
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'Princess Bride' is a wonderfully amusing film.

The book is pretty awful.
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Old 08-18-2018, 09:31 AM
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Logan's Run
Neither the book nor the film is an Immortal Classic, but both are entertaining yarns. The movie has three scenes in which plot and dialog are copied near-verbatim from the book. Then they changed nearly everything else.

They had to change a lot. There is a lot of sex in the book, most of it involving characters who are below the age of consent in the 20th Century USA. More importantly, the book has an awful lot of narrated backstory. Being faithful to the book would have required a dozen Basil Exposition characters, and would have slowed the film to a crawl.

The best Steven King adaptations have usually strayed from his stories. He had near-complete Creative Control on Maximum Overdrive. The result is widely regarded as one of the worst movies ever made.

Bond movies often take liberties with the sources, but sometimes it works out well. A number of Fleming's short stories have ended up as subplots in larger movies. You remember the Scene in Octopussy, when Octopussy tells Bond about her father? That snippet of dialog neatly summarized the entire short story for which the move was named. "The Living Daylights" became a subplot of a subplot in the movie.
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Old 08-18-2018, 09:41 AM
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I'll throw a punch at a well-regarded film.

Blade Runner, from Philip K Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep".

The book is more of a character study and examination of the isolation of a disconnected, technocratic society where people can dial in their emotions and the natural world is essential done with.

The movie is both a mystery and an exploration of the rights of man and what makes a man.

Both have their pluses, though I think the book isn't a great read.
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Old 08-18-2018, 10:56 AM
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My nomination for a great movie that betrayed its source material is The Wizard of Oz, yes, the big MGM musical with Judy Garland. The reason is that the film has the tacked on moral "There's no place like home," and that whole speech Dorothy has about looking for happiness no further than her own back yard.
This was going to be my answer too. Later books make it clear that the Kansas that Dorothy came from was a pretty bleak and crappy place. What she really missed were Aunt Em and Uncle Henry; and when they were allowed to move to Oz, Dorothy was happy to live there too.

Other ways the movie betrayed its source material were were the "it was all a dream" ending (in the book, Oz is definitely a real place), and the "you could have gone home at any time; and I could have told you so but you wouldn't have believed me" BS (in the book, the Good Witch of the North, whom Dorothy meets near the beginning, doesn't know about the magical properties of the ruby silver slippers).
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Old 08-18-2018, 10:57 AM
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Both The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables stage musicals are much better than the novels they are based on. To repeat in capital letters: STAGE MUSICALS.
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Old 08-18-2018, 10:58 AM
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'Princess Bride' is a wonderfully amusing film.

The book is pretty awful.
Well, yeah, if you're reading the original version by S. Morgenstern. William Golding's abridgment is pretty good though.

(Can a movie that was written by the author of the book be a betrayal?)

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Old 08-18-2018, 04:16 PM
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The Quiet American (1958)

Based on Graham Greene’s 1952 novel which proved remarkably prescient about the soon-to-be disastrous U.S. involvement in Indochina - as well as later foreign policy misadventures - this film adaptation completely whitewashed the then-covert U.S. role, effectively reversing/raping the novel’s intent and message. Consequently, the film is not as good (or loyal to the book) as the 2002 remake, yet far more interesting owing to the historical context in which it was made.
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Old 08-18-2018, 04:25 PM
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Both The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables stage musicals are much better than the novels they are based on. To repeat in capital letters: STAGE MUSICALS.
I don't think I'd say that "Les Miserables" is much better than the novel, but I'm positive that "Oliver!" is a great improvement on "Oliver Twist" after ditching a lot of Dickens's stupider plot points.
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Old 08-18-2018, 04:25 PM
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I'll throw a punch at a well-regarded film.

Blade Runner, from Philip K Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep".

The book is more of a character study and examination of the isolation of a disconnected, technocratic society where people can dial in their emotions and the natural world is essential done with.

The movie is both a mystery and an exploration of the rights of man and what makes a man.

Both have their pluses, though I think the book isn't a great read.
The book and the movie handle the question of "what is humanity?" in related but different ways.

In the book, the question is "Can humans lose their humanity and become just like the androids?" (the android characters try to pass as humans by encouraging cynicism and confusion among the humans - it would make no sense for Deckard in the book to be an android).

In the movie, the question is "Can androids have humanity?" (which is why the question of whether Deckard is an android is a valid one for the movie).
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Old 08-18-2018, 05:12 PM
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This was going to be my answer too. Later books make it clear that the Kansas that Dorothy came from was a pretty bleak and crappy place. What she really missed were Aunt Em and Uncle Henry; and when they were allowed to move to Oz, Dorothy was happy to live there too.
You're exactly right. I don't know why I didn't mention that too. By the fourth or so book out of 14 written by Baum (and I read them all again and again) Dorothy is happily settled in Oz, and best friends with the girl ruler of Oz. Toto, of course, lived happily in Oz as well.

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Other ways the movie betrayed its source material were were the "it was all a dream" ending (in the book, Oz is definitely a real place).
A great place. Dorothy wants to go home more out of a sense of duty than a sense of longing.
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Old 08-18-2018, 05:34 PM
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Or are they afraid their writing won't be up to snuff and needs the boost of an established franchise to be successful?
A movie needs to get made before even having a chance at being successful.

Lets compare:

Spectre (2015) IMDb rating 6.8 Rotten Tomatoes 63%
Box Office Mojo: Domestic: $200,074,609 Foreign: $680,600,000

Spy (2015) IMDb rating 7.0 Rotten Tomatoes 94%
Box Office Mojo: Domestic: $110,825,712 Foreign: $124,840,507

OK, someone will trot out that any comparison is a "false comparison" and fine. But the point is the boost of an established franchise isn't negligible. Not by a long shot.
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Old 08-18-2018, 05:46 PM
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Many screenwriters and directors find their source material too boring and add in a love story that didn't appear in the original. I would say all of those, regardless of their skill or success, have betrayed their source.
Marketing a movie is so different from marketing a book that they almost have to do this kind of thing. An expensive move has to appeal to a huge and diverse audience, not just a lot of fanboys/girls who love the source material. A book can last in print for years with a relatively modest audience because it is relative cheap to produce (more so now for digital books).

So frankly I think this kind of criticism is elitist and ridiculous. Any studio that followed it would either go out of business or would not be able to adapt very much source material. Opting for original stories might not be a bad thing, but if you want to see your favorite book on the big screen, you shouldn't be surprised or upset if elements have been added to widen its appeal.
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Old 08-18-2018, 06:28 PM
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A number of Fleming's short stories have ended up as subplots in larger movies. You remember the Scene in Octopussy, when Octopussy tells Bond about her father? That snippet of dialog neatly summarized the entire short story for which the move was named. "The Living Daylights" became a subplot of a subplot in the movie.
Well, the bare bones of the short story Octopussy were used, but rather significantly changed. The character of Octopussy's father (Dexter Smythe) was indeed a disgraced former agent but:

1. He didn't have a daughter, or indeed any children.
2. He didn't take the "honorable alternative" by committing suicide, though Bond assumed he had.

Some of the circumstances were updated, which is fine. Short-story Smythe chanced upon a cache of forgotten Nazi gold, killed his guide, then retired to Jamaica. Movie Smythe was assigned to steal a cache of Chinese gold from North Korea, killed his guide and then disappeared.
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Old 08-18-2018, 06:50 PM
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Fine, then let the writer write a screenplay about a black, lesbian British superspy; just don't call her Bond. Hell, I'd watch it just for the curiosity factor.
Cast Skin from Skunk Anansie as the lead and I'm in. Also, they should have given her a Bond theme tune.
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Old 08-18-2018, 06:56 PM
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The movie 'These three' was based on Lillian Hellman and book 'The Children's hour'. A story about 2 lesbians living together and opening s girls school. The movie was about to women and one of them boyfriend, a local doctor. The original story would be never have passed the censores. So Hellman write in the doctor/boyfriend. They remade it later but it still had the doctor/boyfriend character. The book is a poignant story of the 2 women and their struggles. I liked the movies, but they are different than the book.

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Old 08-19-2018, 04:36 AM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
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(Can a movie that was written by the author of the book be a betrayal?)
I think so. Consider Sin City, based on a comics series written and drawn by Frank Miller, who wrote and co-directed the film. After about a decade of making well-regarded superhero comics, Miller shifted gears and made a crime comic that was grounded in his view of how the world really is, with no fantasy elements. The film was over-the-top cartoony and made no pretense at realism.
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Old 08-19-2018, 10:12 AM
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A Clockcwork Orange and The Shining reportedly didn't please the respective authors, I'm told. And Starship Troopers reduced some themes Heinlein took very seriously to punchlines, though I'm not very bothered by it. A literal adaptation of Frankenstein is likely impossible, but John Whale's film is beautiful.

What are some other great films that took unforgivable liberties with their source novels?

I disagree about Frankenstein. I thought that Calvin Floyd's Victor Frankenstein/Terror of Frankenstein did an amazingly good job, very faithful to the novel.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076881/


The 2004 Hallmark TV-movie is also very faithful to the novel, except that a.) Donald Sutherland is WAY too old to play Captain Walton and b.) The Creature is too damned good-looking. You have to wonder what he's so mad about.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368730...nm_flmg_act_51

Kenneth Branaugh's version looked as if it was going to be faithful, but veered away significantly at many points. It looks gorgeous, though.


And, as pointed out, Starship Troopers started life as an unassociated screenplay that was later shoehorned into being an adaptation, despite being completely at odds with its source material in philosophy, intent, mood, and scientific credibility. It still annoys me considerably. They did the same damned thing with I, Robot, which is an appalling thing if considered as an "adaptation".


Some films which were great, despite departing significantly from the source:

The aforementioned Dr. Strangelove and Bridge on the River Kwai (although only for the ending). Similarly, The African Queen is pretty faithful, except for the changed ending.


Who Framed Roger Rabbit departs very significantly fro Gary Wolfe's novel, but is an excellent commentary on cartoons and our relationship to them. And even to film noir.

Pudd'nhead Wilson, a made-for-TV adaptation of Mark Twain's novel starring Ken Howard takes large liberties with its source material, but is a helluva good film. I highly recommend it. They left the central twist intact.

The Day the Earth Stood Still is far superior to the science fiction short story it's based on, which is the opposite of the way things usually go.

I've never read the short story that Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil is based on, but I understand the film is far superior and takes substantial liberties.

And it's not a masterpiece, by any stretch of the imagination, but They Live is much more entertaining and effective that the short story it's based on.
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Old 08-19-2018, 10:57 AM
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As a person who tried multiple times to read the Song of Ice and Fire and Lord of the Rings series and just couldn't get into them (long before they were developed for Movies and TV) I would submit both adaptations as improvements for me.
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Old 08-19-2018, 03:13 PM
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It's not a great book or movie, but there's some amusement value in the adaptation of Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead. In the novel, Dominique Francon marries Peter Keating, then divorces him to marry Gail Wynand, then divorces him to marry Howard Roark, her soulmate. This would never fly in a film adaptation in 1949, though, so Rand's screenplay of her own novel changed so that Dominique merely broke off her engagement to Peter, and Gail ended their marriage by committing suicide - something his novel-version had considered early on but dismissed. Considering how big Rand was on the theme of not betraying the artist's work, she knew how to sell out when she had to.
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Old 08-19-2018, 04:49 PM
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Apparently Ayn Rand managed to get off meth for awhile after her Hollywood days and wrote The Fountainhead II, a prison drama where Roark turns himself in for rape after coming to accept that the needs of the many do outweigh the wants of a few. The minority characters and scenes of gay love were surprisingly well-realized for the time, including the powerful finale where a transexual woman wrongly imprisoned with men and mentors Roark in math and physics helping him finally get his architecture degree.
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Old 08-19-2018, 06:47 PM
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'Princess Bride' is a wonderfully amusing film.

The book is pretty awful.
What? No way. The book is a lot of fun, very cute, and stands on its own quite well. And, as already pointed out, the movie is written by the author of the book.

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Both The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables stage musicals are much better than the novels they are based on. To repeat in capital letters: STAGE MUSICALS.
Phantom of the Opera? Yes, for sure. I also love the movie version.

Les Mis? The book is amazing, if you get the right translation. The musical is also amazing, though. The movie....was really good, but had some misfires.

Les Mis definitely does not betray its source material, either.

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Well, the bare bones of the short story Octopussy were used, but rather significantly changed. The character of Octopussy's father (Dexter Smythe) was indeed a disgraced former agent but:
Someone should give their opinion about Octopussy some time.
  #35  
Old 08-19-2018, 09:28 PM
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Well, yeah, if you're reading the original version by S. Morgenstern. William Golding's abridgment is pretty good though.
You must be talking about a translation of Mogenstern; the original - in Florinese - is magnificent.
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Old 08-19-2018, 10:19 PM
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Marketing a movie is so different from marketing a book that they almost have to do this kind of thing. An expensive move has to appeal to a huge and diverse audience, not just a lot of fanboys/girls who love the source material. A book can last in print for years with a relatively modest audience because it is relative cheap to produce (more so now for digital books).

So frankly I think this kind of criticism is elitist and ridiculous. Any studio that followed it would either go out of business or would not be able to adapt very much source material. Opting for original stories might not be a bad thing, but if you want to see your favorite book on the big screen, you shouldn't be surprised or upset if elements have been added to widen its appeal.
I agree. And, at the same time, it's not a faithful rendering of the story, which is why I said what I said.
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Old 08-19-2018, 10:55 PM
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Stephen King didn't like the choice of Jack Nicholson for the lead. He said something like the casting of Nicholson essentially foreshadows that the character is going to go crazy.
Kind of funny, that. Randle Patrick McMurphy was burly, red-haired, with a very Irish way about him. Nicholson was dreadfully miscast for that role, but he managed to pull it off rather well.
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Old 08-19-2018, 11:11 PM
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Not a movie but while I enjoyed Daredevil Season 2 on Netflix especially the Punisher episodes, the episodes themselves took iconic Punisher moments and altered them to make Daredevil the more heroic character at the expense of Frank Castle, completely changing the point of the original comic panels.
  #39  
Old 08-20-2018, 08:51 AM
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The Firm movie took a pivotal legal technical plot point and turned it into something completely lame. I do not know why unless they felt they needed to dumb down the plot for the audience. I had read the book first and was completely off balance when this happened until I realized that they had corrupted the plot for the film.

The Hunt for Red October movie took a pivotal strategic plot point and turned it into something completely lame. I do not know why unless they felt they needed to dumb down the plot for the audience. I had read the book first and was completely off balance when this happened until I realized that they had corrupted the plot for the film.
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Old 08-20-2018, 09:11 AM
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Fine, then let the writer write a screenplay about a black, lesbian British superspy; just don't call her Bond.
Cast Grace Jones!

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Phantom of the Opera? Yes, for sure. I also love the movie version.
Which one? There have been several.
  #41  
Old 08-20-2018, 09:59 AM
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Still, making him black or gay or American (which has, I know, actually been done) is a betrayal of the source material.
I'd agree regarding gay and American, because if there are 3 things the average person on the street knows about Bond, it's that he's a spy, he's British, and he loves the ladies. I can only assume those three are constants in the books as well.

But this is a legitimate question, from someone who hasn't read any of the books: Is it actually stated or even implied in the books that Bond is white? Or is that just assumed by readers who are white?
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Old 08-20-2018, 10:26 AM
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I've only read "Casino Royale", and there's not any explicit mention of Bond being white, but he is described as being reminiscent of Hoagy Carmichael, who is white.
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Old 08-20-2018, 10:29 AM
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I've only read "Casino Royale", and there's not any explicit mention of Bond being white, but he is described as being reminiscent of Hoagy Carmichael, who is white.
And yet no actor ever cast as Bond has looked anything like Hoagy Carmichael. Is that also a betrayal of the source material?
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Old 08-20-2018, 10:58 AM
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I've heard that the author of Mary Poppins felt the Disney Movie was a betrayal of the source material.
  #45  
Old 08-20-2018, 11:17 AM
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The Hunt for Red October movie took a pivotal strategic plot point and turned it into something completely lame. I do not know why unless they felt they needed to dumb down the plot for the audience. I had read the book first and was completely off balance when this happened until I realized that they had corrupted the plot for the film.
What plot point did they change? There are strategic holes that I've noticed in the movie. I've read the book once but it was ages ago.
  #46  
Old 08-20-2018, 11:40 AM
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But this is a legitimate question, from someone who hasn't read any of the books: Is it actually stated or even implied in the books that Bond is white? Or is that just assumed by readers who are white?
I'm not sure it was explicitly stated, but it would have been the kind of thing that "went without saying." In the 1950s and 1960s, if Bond had been black (or anything other than white) it would have been unequivocally remarked on given the social circles he was moving in. I'm sure that there were instances of Bond posing as a Russian or German or other European to infiltrate some villain's hideout. And of course, several stories take place in part in Florida where he would have encountered segregated facilities at the time if he were black.

Last edited by Colibri; 08-20-2018 at 11:41 AM.
  #47  
Old 08-20-2018, 11:49 AM
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I've heard that the author of Mary Poppins felt the Disney Movie was a betrayal of the source material.
True that. Despite a Disney movie showing the conflict -- and downplaying it considerably -- although Unca Walt desperately wanted to make a sequal, she did not allow it.
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  #48  
Old 08-20-2018, 12:21 PM
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The movie version of "Ready Player One" can consume fecal matter and expire. Its a horrible abomination of an amazing book.
  #49  
Old 08-20-2018, 12:22 PM
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Jaws the book was about a shark and a love triangle between Brody, his wife and Hooper. Which is why Hooper had to die. I like that the movie got rid of this distraction.
  #50  
Old 08-20-2018, 12:30 PM
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Some really great movies have been betrayals of their source material and were actually better for it. A Clockcwork Orange and The Shining reportedly didn't please the respective authors, I'm told.
The Shining was definitely not "better for it" though. The book is the best thing Stephen King has ever written to date. A decent movie was made that was loosely based on it but didn't tell the same story, didn't develop the characters as written, and lost a lot of what made the book so great. Kubrick's movie had some great moments but was a substantially flawed piece of work (to watch Jack Torrance / Nicholson gradually go insane is a lot like watching Jim Carrey gradually become annoying; Shelley Duval as Wenday was busy doing a Fay Wray reprise instead of being a strong if damaged character; Scatman Crothers as Dick Hallorann spent frantic minutes getting back to the hotel only to get killed off on arrival, not an improvement in the plot flow; the final denoument of the Jack character forgetting the furnace boiler and the hotel subsequently blowing up is replaced with people running in aimless circles and a fade to a photograph. And Danny, instead of being the hero, is scarcely even the primary vantage point. Shoulda stuck with the source material. And done better casting.
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