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Old 09-08-2018, 10:45 AM
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Hurricane Florence

It's days away and may not even hit the United States at all, but I am nervous. We live in Faber, Virginia in Nelson County at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains. All summer it has rained and the ground is saturated. A major rain event here could be catastrophic.

It has happened before.


In 1969 the remnants of Hurricane Camille stalled here and dumped over 27 inches of rain in six hours. That summer had also been extremely wet before the big storm. Here in Nelson County over 140 people died as flash floods and mountainsides washed down into narrow valleys. The area was much more sparsely populated then. There are lots of us tucked up in these hills now.

This summer some people in our area have already been worrying about what would happen if a tropical system were to come here after all this rain. And now many computer models are showing just such a scenario.

No matter where this storm hits, if it is as strong as predicted the results will be terrible. The whole Appalachian chain is already waterlogged. After seeing the current Federal Government's response to last year's storms I have little confidence in its ability to cope with a major hurricane disaster on the East Coast.

So Florence please go away.

Last edited by Biotop; 09-08-2018 at 10:46 AM.
  #2  
Old 09-08-2018, 11:37 AM
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I would definitely concoct a plan for leaving if I were you. Consider the circumstances that would need to happen and then, if that line is crossed, enact your get-out-of-Dodge plan. Have your destination in mind, have supplies you might need, have storm-proofing stuff ready to go on your house (shutters and what not), etc.

You don't have to be crazy about it. Just prepare as you can and cross your fingers.

Good luck!
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Old 09-08-2018, 01:57 PM
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We're also saturated in NJ; much more rain and we're going to slide away into the Delaware.

The spaghetti models are increasingly confident that the Carolinas will take the big hit, but there are strands showing possibilities up and down the East Coast.
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Old 09-08-2018, 06:04 PM
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Heavy rain from this storm has the potential to do serious harm. We currently have rain forecast here every day for the next week. Right now the ground is so saturated that every afternoon storm leads to minor flooding. The thought of what might happen if a storm suddenly dumped 10+ inches of rain in these mountains right now is frightening.
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Old 09-08-2018, 06:59 PM
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I would definitely concoct a plan for leaving if I were you. Consider the circumstances that would need to happen and then, if that line is crossed, enact your get-out-of-Dodge plan.
Note that leaving at the last minute can be the worst option--you get caught in gridlock--and you don't want to be gridlocked on a highway when the hurricane strikes.
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Old 09-09-2018, 06:01 PM
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So the ground here in Central Virginia is mud from all the rain this summer and fall. When I drove over the Rockfish River this morning it was already close to flood stage. It has been flooding off and on all summer. I keep reading one forecast after another for the potential of flooding here from Florence.

Yet I am the only one who seems to be really alarmed by this. Folks at work say they have been through hurricanes before and I am being paranoid. Am I?

My fear is that double digit inches of rain in this mountainous area after all this rain already will cause massive floods, damage and loss of life. Am I being over dramatic? Talk me down.
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Old 09-09-2018, 07:57 PM
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How is your house located in relation to the possible flooding--do you live in a low area/near the river?

How far are you from the ocean? My guess is the wind speed will be down substantially by the time it hits your place.

Anyway get prepared: whether keeping your gas tank near full, suitcases packed, extra cash in your billfold, plenty of groceries, plywood on the windows, your stuff off the floor...
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Old 09-09-2018, 10:37 PM
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I am inland in the mountains. No coastal danger here. But in these foothills the ground is more than saturated. The local streams and rivers are already overflowing and it has rained again all day today.

We live in deep woods a couple of miles down a windy dirt road that crosses streams. Our house is surrounded by trees and mountains and sits perched on the side of a hill. Look at the pictures in the link I originally posted for Hurricane Camille. Our home is within walking distance of ground zero for that event. There is no stream directly by our house, but there is a small one several hundred feet down in the woods.

I am concerned about downed trees. During the derecho a few years back it was a week before all the trees were cleared off the roads. We had one small tree on our house that time, and a much larger tree crashed down very close just missing our parked car.

The rains this summer have been relentless. I have never seen it rain so much. If there is as much rain as some models forecast I worry about mudslides.
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:01 AM
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I can't see your terrain, or if your house is on hard rock, shale, or dirt, or how it's anchored, but, if you want my two cents, here.
If I were so worried, I'd gather up important documents, family members, pets, meds, and bug out for a week or so. I'm guessing that, even if your house suffers no damage, the power will go out the the winding road in and out will have washouts and downed trees, which would leave you isolated. If anyone needs to be in air-conditioning or to run oxygen machines, or in other ways needs power, go. If nothing happens, you can laugh at yourself later.

However, if your house is well-anchored, and you have good supplies, and are handy with a chain saw, you might want to stay home to enjoy the peace and quiet and lamp light, and get started on clearing up the downed trees. If you are worried about a tree coming down through the roof onto your beds, sleep downstairs.

The amount of rain you get will depend on how fast the storm moves.

Good luck
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:40 AM
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I can't see your terrain, or if your house is on hard rock, shale, or dirt, or how it's anchored, but, if you want my two cents, here.
If I were so worried, I'd gather up important documents, family members, pets, meds, and bug out for a week or so. I'm guessing that, even if your house suffers no damage, the power will go out the the winding road in and out will have washouts and downed trees, which would leave you isolated. If anyone needs to be in air-conditioning or to run oxygen machines, or in other ways needs power, go. If nothing happens, you can laugh at yourself later.

However, if your house is well-anchored, and you have good supplies, and are handy with a chain saw, you might want to stay home to enjoy the peace and quiet and lamp light, and get started on clearing up the downed trees. If you are worried about a tree coming down through the roof onto your beds, sleep downstairs.

The amount of rain you get will depend on how fast the storm moves.

Good luck
The storm track looks like it's going inland 75 miles or so, and stopping. This is not going to end well.
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Old 09-10-2018, 07:19 AM
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I'm guessing that, even if your house suffers no damage, the power will go out the the winding road in and out will have washouts and downed trees, which would leave you isolated.

(...)

The amount of rain you get will depend on how fast the storm moves.
That would be my concern as well. From experience, most of the casualties of our own disaster last year were related to communities or individuals becoming cut off from relief/resupply/evacuation after seemingly making it through the initial impact with manageable damages.

BTW, there is reason to worry about trees, as oversaturated ground also makes them easier to topple even in moderate storm conditions.

Last edited by JRDelirious; 09-10-2018 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 09-10-2018, 07:40 AM
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The storm track looks like it's going inland 75 miles or so, and stopping. This is not going to end well.
Yeah, I'm currently in line to get whacked on Friday/Saturday.
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Old 09-10-2018, 08:05 AM
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So the ground here in Central Virginia is mud from all the rain this summer and fall. When I drove over the Rockfish River this morning it was already close to flood stage. It has been flooding off and on all summer. I keep reading one forecast after another for the potential of flooding here from Florence.

Yet I am the only one who seems to be really alarmed by this. Folks at work say they have been through hurricanes before and I am being paranoid. Am I?

Florence looks like a rather powerful storm; even where people have experienced hurricanes before, not all hurricanes are the same, and it's a pretty good idea to be ready for worse-than-usual flooding.

So I wouldn't panic, but what are the precautions you can take in case of flooding?

Can you prepare your yard/home?

Can you ready a go bag in case you need to evacuate?

Make sure you have batteries, emergency radio, food that can be kept without refrigeration on hand, etc?

The Red Cross has a page advising people on how to prepare for flooding...
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Old 09-10-2018, 09:23 AM
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Yet I am the only one who seems to be really alarmed by this. Folks at work say they have been through hurricanes before and I am being paranoid. Am I?

My fear is that double digit inches of rain in this mountainous area after all this rain already will cause massive floods, damage and loss of life. Am I being over dramatic? Talk me down.
Hurricanes are massive. Many people can go through the same hurricane and have vastly different experiences. Think of a hurricane like the face of a clock. The part from 11-3 is going to have a *lot* of rain and flooding. The center has a *lot* of dangerous wind. If you're down by the 7, there will be some winds and rain, but it will likely not be devastating and you may not experience any damage.

The common danger with hurricanes is with flooding. If you're in a flood-prone area and you're going to be hit by the rainy quadrant of the hurricane, you should get out. If you're going to get hit by the eye of the storm, there could be massive damage. However, the eye can wobble a lot and a few mile difference of where it hits will have vastly different effects on what gets damaged. It's like how a tornado can tear through a neighborhood and one house has the roof taken off and the one next door is fine. If you're inland, the strength of the eye will die off and the wind damage won't be as devastating.

So I would suggest keeping an eye on the hurricane and see where it's going to hit and where you are in the storm. If you are the type to really fret and worry, get away and stay somewhere else. There's not much you can do at your house anyway. If it's going to get damaged, there won't be much you can do to stop it. If nothing happens, oh well, you had a little vacation where you watched the weather channel non-stop.
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Old 09-10-2018, 09:32 AM
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After experiencing Harvey flooding here in Houston, I'd bug out sooner rather than later. We didn't get the hurricane winds, but flooding can be so devastating. My family didn't have their homes flooded, but many of my friends did.

Stay safe - all of you.
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Old 09-10-2018, 09:44 AM
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DC suburbs here.

There's a large "dry pond" area in our development that handles stormwater overflow. Most of the time there's no visible water there, it's just a green grassy area. I drove past it an hour ago and it's a lake. We've had substantial rain lately as well. I hope it has a chance to drain in the next day or so. I saw a county truck checking out another stormwater management spot along the same road.

I'm hoping that we don't lose both power and water - after Sandy, we lost power for a few hours which meant our sump pump didn't work. We had a water backup sump pump installed after that, so unless we lose both (we lost water for a bit after Isabel in 2003 or so) the basement *should* be OK.

There are plenty of roads around here where standing water would be an issue, and flash floods aren't unknown. I once had a very visible demonstration of why you don't go through standing water: I saw some ahead on US 29 west of town, decided I'd better not go that way, and pulled into a parking lot to turn around. As I waited for my chance to get back onto the road, a bus went by after having gone through the water.... and water was pouring out of its door - as in, the water was deep enough to reach the floor of the bus!
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Old 09-10-2018, 10:50 AM
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We decided to book a hotel in Charlottesville to wait out the storm. If it goes somewhere else or is not as bad as expected, then I am out that money but so what?
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Old 09-10-2018, 10:52 AM
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Smart move.
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:02 AM
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If you're not in the area but you want to watch the local news during the storm, see if any of the local TV channels have a streaming app. That way you can watch their coverage on your computer, Roku, etc. The local weather coverage is much more detailed as to where the effects of the storm will hit. We were watching the local channels during the Florida hurricane and they had overlays of the city to say where they thought flooding would be and how much to expect. We could see where our relative's house was and get an idea what was going to happen to it.

However, understand that the newscasters often hype up the worse possibility. Whatever the worst possibility might be, expect them to hype that over and over all day long "10' of flooding! 150 MPH winds!! Oh no!". The reality is often much less, and the max damage happens in a limited area. Of course, it sucks if you're in the area which gets hit the hardest, but most places won't experience the worst.
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:13 AM
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We decided to book a hotel in Charlottesville to wait out the storm. If it goes somewhere else or is not as bad as expected, then I am out that money but so what?
Glad to hear that! It looks to be a very dangerous storm.

Be safe everyone.
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:29 AM
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Smart move.
+1

You might still want to have some no-heat-required food in your hotel room, as the hotel itself might lose power - also maybe request a room on the second, third or fourth floors.
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:41 AM
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I don't know if we need to to bug out - watching the track - but we do have some prepping to do. I want to make sure we have batteries and our propane lantern is findable, as well as making sure we have sufficient bread / PB&J and so on. We've been extremely fortunate in the past in that we've never lost power for more than a few hours - the same CANNOT be said of other parts of the DC area.

Other things to think of, for those hunkering down:
- Have battery backups for everything possible (phone chargers etc.). If you use a CPAP or whatever, make extra sure you have something to support that.
- Make sure you know how to open your garage door if the power is out (ours requires us to pull a cord attached to the opener)
- Fill bathtubs with water to use for toilet flushing and maybe handwashing (not for drinking)
- Have a jug of water to use for handwashing especially if hand sanitizer makes you gag
- Have some bottled water (you can fill pitchers with tap water) for drinking
- Fill freezers - zip-loc bags of water if nothing else
- Prefreeze some of those bags of water, and put them in the fridge before things get bad, while you add fresh bags to the freezer itself
- If you've got thoughtless household members, **tie the fridge doors shut**. During Isabel, my daughter tried opening the fridge without thinking, after the power went out.
- Have a bag packed with critical stuff just in case
- If your house has a garage, back the cars up as far as possible to be within an inch of the door - heavy winds can blow the door in and rip the roof off from underneath, and having the cars brace the door will reduce the risk of that happening.
- Bring in lawn furniture if possible. Our table was too big to bring in - so we turned it upside down figuring the wind couldn't do much with the thin legs, and it had no tabletop to get underneath to send it flying.
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:54 AM
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Looks like it will come ashore in North Carolina (or maybe northern South Carolina) and will almost certainly coast into Virginia still with 50+ mph winds.
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Old 09-10-2018, 12:21 PM
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The track shows it less than 10 miles from my house. I'm 10 miles from the ocean, and according to the realtor who sold me this house; "23 feet above mean high tide, so you're on a virtual mountain here". We'll see.
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Old 09-10-2018, 12:33 PM
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Fill up all cars and any gas cans you may have. The recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida had gas outages far and wide well after the storm because of people hoarding gas.

Have full propane tanks for grills to make cooking easier if you lose power.

Have calorie-dense foods that don't need refrigeration or cooking: nuts, dried fruits, canned fish, PB&J, energy bars, trail mix, etc. Have sweet treats like frosted cookies, candy, jelly beans, etc. to break the monotony.

Clean out gutters so that the water doesn't back up.

Bring in outdoor stuff that could become airborne, such as patio furniture, plants, toys, etc.

Pack your freezer with water bottles or other containers. They'll freeze up and can be used for cooling and drinking later.

Don't park cars under trees since branches may fall. Consider parking your car on an upper floor of a parking garage to keep it safe from debris and flooding.
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Old 09-10-2018, 12:38 PM
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Bring in outdoor stuff that could become airborne, such as patio furniture, plants, toys, etc.
If you have a pool (and there is water in it) you can throw patio furniture into the pool to keep it safe.
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Old 09-10-2018, 02:14 PM
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They have called for evacuation of the whole SC coast now, including reversing highways.



I was at Myrtle Beach just a few days ago--seems odd to think that it will potentially be significantly changed from what it was then less than a week from now. (I remember going there after Hugo, seeing the stairs at the end of boardwalks hanging mid-air and concrete septic tanks sitting on bare ground.)
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Old 09-10-2018, 04:01 PM
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Fill up all cars and any gas cans you may have. The recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida had gas outages far and wide well after the storm because of people hoarding gas.


Yep, “gas panic” can cause difficulties even if actual supply is only minimally disrupted.

BTW be sure the car battery is in good shape. With the key to the “Acc” position your car can be your biggest, most expensive sit-in cell phone recharger.
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Old 09-10-2018, 04:03 PM
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Yep, “gas panic” can cause difficulties even if actual supply is only minimally disrupted.

BTW be sure the car battery is in good shape. With the key to the “Acc” position your car can be your biggest, most expensive sit-in cell phone recharger.
And air conditioner (well, you'd want to run the engine a bit for that....)
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Old 09-10-2018, 04:07 PM
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The track shows it less than 10 miles from my house. I'm 10 miles from the ocean, and according to the realtor who sold me this house; "23 feet above mean high tide, so you're on a virtual mountain here". We'll see.
Er.... 23 feet above *average* high tide which means it could be higher, and the storm surge is predicted to be 10-20 feet, so....

Though I doubt it'd be anything like that high, that far inland.

We were at Isle of Palms last summer for the eclipse. The place we stayed at was a few blocks from the beach, and when we walked to the shore we passed between the oceanfront mansions. All were separated from the actual waterfront by fairly high dunes (man-made) - which I presume would reduce the potential storm surge damage. I'd still be sweating bullets if I owned one of those places. Hell, the place we stayed at may be oceanfront next week .
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Old 09-10-2018, 04:19 PM
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Anyone considering evacuating, I'd suggest you make hotel reservations NOW. Rooms within any reasonable distance will be at a premium starting tomorrow as the mandatory evacuations go into effect.

We've got some sofa space if anyone makes their way up to the DC area; I expect we'll see a LOT of rain and possible power outages but we're not in a flood-prone area, so we're not planning on going anywhere.
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:39 PM
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We decided to book a hotel in Charlottesville to wait out the storm. If it goes somewhere else or is not as bad as expected, then I am out that money but so what?
I think that's a smart move. Your description of the road in and out of your place, and the waterlogged ground, made it sound like potential trouble. Just in case the power goes out in Charlottesville, make sure you have your phones fully charged, and a back-up charging unit fully charged, and, as someone else suggested, some no cook food and beverages, and a rechargeable weather radio.

But I hope it turns out to be simply a nice vacation getaway, and you have no problems.

All Dopers in the paths of Florence and Olivia, stay safe. Though I'm glad that Florida and Puerto Rico aren't in the crosshairs this time, I feel for everyone who is.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:09 AM
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I think that's a smart move. Your description of the road in and out of your place, and the waterlogged ground, made it sound like potential trouble. Just in case the power goes out in Charlottesville, make sure you have your phones fully charged, and a back-up charging unit fully charged, and, as someone else suggested, some no cook food and beverages, and a rechargeable weather radio.

But I hope it turns out to be simply a nice vacation getaway, and you have no problems.

All Dopers in the paths of Florence and Olivia, stay safe. Though I'm glad that Florida and Puerto Rico aren't in the crosshairs this time, I feel for everyone who is.
But I am having second thoughts. Yes the road going in and out of our home is almost certain to get washed out. But there are others living up in the nooks and crannys here. We would not be completely isolated. We have about a week's worth of fresh water.

The biggest issue I see is our dogs. It sounds corny, but they are like our children. I love those two dogs to death, and if we cart them into town to the hotel for at least a week I can see all sorts of problems. The little dog was hit by a car several years ago and lost an eye. Since that accident she has been very skittish around people and sometimes tries to bite. But she is really a sweet animal just shy. Odie the older dog is scared of storms. The hotel we booked says pets are OK... but I am concerned. There is no one we know in Town to stay with if something goes wrong at the hotel.

Secondly, just about everything my wife and I have is tied up in our house. I love our little house in the woods. If a tree were to fall on it or there was some other damage we might be able to mitigate the damage if we are here. The loss of the house in a mudslide is a very worst case scenario. Yes it happened to homes nearby during Camille, but that was 27 inches in six hours. I hate the thought of going away for who knows how long and not being able to protect our property. We will certainly lose power and wifi early on and probably for a long period of time.

If we stay in the hotel my wife and I would probably each have to try and go to work. We both are mid level grocery store managers and the hotel is less than a mile in each direction from each of the our stores. As you might imagine, the stores have been crazy the last couple of days. We'd probably each have to split time working if we are in Town. I think power outages in Town are also certain.


I don't know what to do.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:56 AM
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I don't know what to do.
If there's flooding of the access road, mudslides or trees falling, you cannot mitigate anything, and you could find yourself getting hurt, as well as your property. There was a member on another forum who had a tree come down in a previous hurricane, and nobody could get in or out to their property because it blocked their access road. I think it's better to be on the outside where you have access to supplies, than on the inside and having limited supplies. It took some time for the "chopper people" to get to cutting up the tree, because they were going around to all the people who had issues. It can take some time.

My little dog is a rescue and a bit of a yapper. I think he'd be fine in a hotel (not that any hotels here allow dogs) with me. Usually dogs are fine if they are with "their pack".

I think going into town sounds like a sound plan, but obviously it's your decision.
  #36  
Old 09-11-2018, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by blob View Post
If there's flooding of the access road, mudslides or trees falling, you cannot mitigate anything, and you could find yourself getting hurt, as well as your property. There was a member on another forum who had a tree come down in a previous hurricane, and nobody could get in or out to their property because it blocked their access road. I think it's better to be on the outside where you have access to supplies, than on the inside and having limited supplies. It took some time for the "chopper people" to get to cutting up the tree, because they were going around to all the people who had issues. It can take some time.

My little dog is a rescue and a bit of a yapper. I think he'd be fine in a hotel (not that any hotels here allow dogs) with me. Usually dogs are fine if they are with "their pack".

I think going into town sounds like a sound plan, but obviously it's your decision.
^Agree. Things are replaceable. You, your wife, and dogs are not. Stay with your plan and go to the hotel. It looks like from the forecast your area is going to get a ton of rain, and potentially damaging winds. You all are safer in town for this one.
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:39 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Old Town Alexandria is flooding along the waterfront and it’s not even raining yet.

I’m on a hillside but I’m worried about my basement. All my possessions are down there. Going to look into getting a little pump in case there’s seepage.
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:54 AM
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Going to look into getting a little pump in case there’s seepage.
You might also want to get some Damp Rid buckets to deal with any residual moisture.
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Old 09-11-2018, 08:00 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is online now
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My view, FWIW.

A few years ago our house was in danger of sea-flooding. A big storm with high tide and we're in a low-lying area. It was pretty much nailed-on. There was danger to life and property and but we were all prepared to wait it out. We had a day or so to get ready so prepped the house as much as possible, got supplies, moved the car to a dry place, moved valuable upstairs etc. etc.

It was incredibly stressful at that point, then in the few hours left we were sitting in the house, waiting for the inevitable and utterly unable to do anything more and powerless to do anything if/when the waters came.
My wife and I looked at each other and decided to get out. We booked a hotel a few miles away on high ground, took the kids and left.

Best decision ever. Once we were away from the house our minds settled down. We'd done what we could, we couldn't do anything more even if we remained and at that point the damage was in the lap of the wind gods and Neptune. We slept soundly. fully expecting to find flood damage in the morning.

We were lucky, the tide was slightly lower than expected, the wind went slightly offshore and the flood defences were only just high enough so no flooding occurred but even so I'm glad we did it.

In the case of Florence I think it is a certainty that bad things are going to happen and given that I'd be even more eager to get away and the quicker the better.

Good luck and best wishes to all involved.
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Old 09-11-2018, 08:00 AM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Originally Posted by snowthx View Post
^Agree. Things are replaceable. You, your wife, and dogs are not. Stay with your plan and go to the hotel. It looks like from the forecast your area is going to get a ton of rain, and potentially damaging winds. You all are safer in town for this one.
Agree.
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Old 09-11-2018, 08:03 AM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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You might also want to get some Damp Rid buckets to deal with any residual moisture.

And move books and papers and other easily damaged possessions upstairs. Good luck!
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Old 09-11-2018, 08:03 AM
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The hotel we booked says pets are OK... but I am concerned. There is no one we know in Town to stay with if something goes wrong at the hotel.
My relatives who evacuated during Irma said all the hotels they stayed at were like dog hotels. Lots of rooms had dogs. They'd hear barking up and down the hallways as they walked by. So don't worry at all about your pets at the hotel. You won't be the only ones who bring them.
  #43  
Old 09-11-2018, 10:38 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
Old Town Alexandria is flooding along the waterfront and it’s not even raining yet.

I’m on a hillside but I’m worried about my basement. All my possessions are down there. Going to look into getting a little pump in case there’s seepage.
It's rained so much around here lately that all the streams are at their limits. I happened to be driving last Friday evening just as the storm hit and it was one of the heavier rainfalls I've ever had to navigate through.

We have a sump pump - they were required by code when our house was built.

Of course, when Hurricane Sandy hit and we lost power, the pump didn't work so well We were lucky we just had a couple inches of water in the lower area of the basement. We were down there clearing out things that had been sitting on the floor when I became aware of a faint hum, and we realized power had just come back on. The water was gone within minutes.

We put in a water-powered backup after that (suggested by some folks on the Dope, I think). I expect we'll be testing that out.

I decided to pop down to Costco last night to pick up some no-heat-required food (and a little bottled water). I was not the only one with that idea - the place was mobbed and the checkout line was longer than I'd ever seen.

I came out with one of the few cases of bottled water (yeah, yeah, but it is convenient and will last us years in normal use) they had left. Got several shelf-stable foods (dunno how the Madras lentils will be cold, but we can eat 'em and like 'em). I also got some Vienna sausages - which are vile in concept but as I recall surprisingly tasty if you're hungry. I was not the only person getting such "treats". I passed on the case of Spam someone else scored as I walked by.

And bread (we already have PB).

The checkout lines were as noted quite long, but as someone was loudly singing opera in the nearby employee breakroom, I didn't mind.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 09-11-2018 at 10:42 AM.
  #44  
Old 09-11-2018, 11:34 AM
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A buddy of mine lives in Topsail Beach, NC. As near as I can tell from the storm maps, Florence is headed straight for his living room. He and the wife and dog bugged out this morning for safer climes.
  #45  
Old 09-11-2018, 11:37 AM
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My wife is now adamant about not leaving. She is worried about the cat. So say some prayers for us.
  #46  
Old 09-11-2018, 11:46 AM
PastTense PastTense is online now
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Can't you take the cat along?
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Old 09-11-2018, 11:52 AM
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Too many pets for the hotels.

I think my wife is over stressed and not thinking clearly (which is hard right now). Everything we have is wrapped up in this house. She is fatalistic and I will stick by her.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:01 PM
filmore filmore is offline
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If it keeps its track, you guys will likely be in the outer bands. You'll probably get waves of rain, but it probably won't be like that situation from Camille where so much rain was dropped in such a short time. Other places on the coast may get dumped on quickly, but I would guess your rain will not be as heavy. A big question is where it moves after it hits landfall. If it meanders north, you're probably in for several days of heavy rain. Look at floodplain (or floodpain ) maps of your area to gauge how likely it is for your house to flood.

Do you have any watercraft? If so, it's a good idea to keep it handy. Even if your house doesn't flood, it may make getting around easier after the storm.

You'll probably be okay, but keep in mind that things can go bad extremely quickly. Think now what you'll do if the water rises enough to enter the house. For example, they say to leave an axe in the attic as a way to escape if need be. Just be prepared for what could happen.
  #49  
Old 09-11-2018, 12:08 PM
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manson1972 manson1972 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biotop View Post
Too many pets for the hotels.

I think my wife is over stressed and not thinking clearly (which is hard right now). Everything we have is wrapped up in this house. She is fatalistic and I will stick by her.
I'm sorry, but I don't understand this. You could potentially die in a hurricane and you are worried about the hotel? Just lie, and then put all your animals in your room.

Also, I understand that everything you have is wrapped up in your house, but what does you staying in danger do to help that?
  #50  
Old 09-11-2018, 12:21 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biotop View Post
Too many pets for the hotels.

I think my wife is over stressed and not thinking clearly (which is hard right now). Everything we have is wrapped up in this house. She is fatalistic and I will stick by her.
Correction: everything you have is sleeping next to you in the bed (or will be in a pet carrier).

Things can be replaced.

People (and beloved pets) cannot.

Get the house in as good shape as you can and GTF out of there. The hotel is NOT going to be watching that closely as you smuggle the cat in.

Hell, bring her up here to NoVa. Our couch may not be as comfy as a hotel, we might lose power, but we're not in a flood-prone area. and we need help eating those damn Vienna sausages!
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