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Old 09-19-2018, 03:35 PM
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The one scene that sullies an otherwise good film

The are a number of things about Sergio Leone's "The Good the Bad and the Ugly" that qualify it as being probably the best the spaghetti western genre has to offer. Great cast, iconic theme song, good cinematography, interesting story.....but there is one scene that totally gets it wrong. I'm talking about the interrogation scene, where Lee Van Cleef's character roughs up Tuco while trying to find out where gold is hidden. Confederate soldiers are ordered to play music to drown out the sounds of the interrogation....and the soldiers are supposed to be crying out of sadness for some stranger getting beaten up. I'm sorry, but that's always struck me as hitting the wrong chord.

What about you; are there films you enjoy a great deal but contain one scene that somehow just ruins it for you?
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Old 09-19-2018, 03:38 PM
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Confederate soldiers are ordered to play music to drown out the sounds of the interrogation....and the soldiers are supposed to be crying out of sadness for some stranger getting beaten up. I'm sorry, but that's always struck me as hitting the wrong chord.
I could see that if the soldier had been early into his cups.
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Old 09-19-2018, 04:09 PM
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Any scene with Mickey Rooney in "Breakfast at Tiffany's." I think there are only two or three but they are painfully cringeworthy and they ruin the entire film.
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Old 09-19-2018, 04:59 PM
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That scene in the Dark Knight where Batman ran off from a party and left the Joker behind to kill all the guests.
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Old 09-19-2018, 05:16 PM
Algher Algher is offline
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The are a number of things about Sergio Leone's "The Good the Bad and the Ugly" that qualify it as being probably the best the spaghetti western genre has to offer. Great cast, iconic theme song, good cinematography, interesting story.....but there is one scene that totally gets it wrong. I'm talking about the interrogation scene, where Lee Van Cleef's character roughs up Tuco while trying to find out where gold is hidden. Confederate soldiers are ordered to play music to drown out the sounds of the interrogation....and the soldiers are supposed to be crying out of sadness for some stranger getting beaten up. I'm sorry, but that's always struck me as hitting the wrong chord.

What about you; are there films you enjoy a great deal but contain one scene that somehow just ruins it for you?
Huh - I always saw that as them crying because it wasn't the first time, nor would it be the last time, that they had to play to cover up the sounds. They weren't crying for Tuco, they were crying for their fellow soldiers who had been through the same.
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Old 09-19-2018, 06:09 PM
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Huh - I always saw that as them crying because it wasn't the first time, nor would it be the last time, that they had to play to cover up the sounds. They weren't crying for Tuco, they were crying for their fellow soldiers who had been through the same.
I took it that they weren't crying for Tuco specifically; but for a fellow soldier, a comrade.
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Old 09-19-2018, 10:57 PM
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Even when watching Pulp Fiction the first time while in the theater, I wanted... needed... to fast-forward through the taxi cab scene with Bruce Willis and the cab driver.
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Old 09-19-2018, 11:07 PM
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Django Unchained.
Not the oft-mentioned Tarentino Aussie cameo, but the first shootout -- with a huge bodycount and absurd amounts of blood flying all over the place.
I understand it's deliberately OTT but it just didn't work for me.
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:39 AM
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The "Can you read my mind?" scene in Superman.
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:49 AM
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Disney's original Alice in Wonderland. In the Mad Tea Party, the March Hare is trying to repair the Mzd Hatter's watch (with sugar, jam and butter), and the watch explodes. At the moment of the explosion, the picture goes to black and white, and the animation looks all screwed up.
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Old 09-20-2018, 02:03 AM
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Jaws - death of Quint. Really can a shark eat you with half its body out of the water?
Rocky III - Mick's heart attack just before the first Lang fight
Godfather III - surprisingly it's not Sophia C's acting but the death of Joey Saza (up to the hospital scene.)
Rambo II - Rambo's last lines
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But never mind specific instances. I hate any scene showing a desperate struggle through thick, visible rain, or against lashing waves.
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Old 09-20-2018, 07:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExTank
I took it that they weren't crying for Tuco specifically; but for a fellow soldier, a comrade.
I've considered that as well. Even if that was the intent, the scene still doesn't wash for me.

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Even when watching Pulp Fiction the first time while in the theater, I wanted... needed... to fast-forward through the taxi cab scene with Bruce Willis and the cab driver.
YES! Talk about hitting the brakes in the middle of a film. The dialogue sucked, and the entire scene was completely unnecessary in terms of advancing the plot.
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Old 09-20-2018, 04:47 PM
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Any time Dennis Weaver, as ridiculously bumbling milksop, appeared in Touch of Evil.

Several mind-bogglingly, implausibly dumb scenes in The Last Seduction.

Dancing at the party in Blue Velvet. That was so dragged out, Kyle and Linda snogging away, ad nauseam, PLUS the "and kiss for-eh-eh-verrrrrr" choral singing to go with it - holy shit what a fucking painful scene that was. Yeah I know it's Lynch and he's weird, but manoman it bogged down the flick for a bit, there.

The inexcusably dumb three-way offing at the end of Reservoir Dogs.

I might have chuckled slightly at first viewing of the fast-motion sex scene in A Clockwork Orange, but it definitely doesn't stand up to repeated viewings.

Sex scenes in the otherwise transcendant Space is the Place.

Debauched pool scene in The Last Picture Show (jeez am I starting to get all schoolmarmy, here?)

"Trippy" Stargate sequence in 2001.

Grandpa in Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

The dinner scene in My Dinner with Andre.

Any of the musical bits in The Ruling Class.

The combat half of Full Metal Jacket.
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Old 09-20-2018, 05:01 PM
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Prodigy had several.

The scenes where counselor guy is talking to the creepy girl are great. But the scenes where he is out of the room and talking to creepy girl's handlers are cheesy and poorly written.
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:58 PM
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Dennis Weaver is one of the best things in Touch of Evil. He is delightfully weird, though I can understand how it can be off-putting on first viewing. But his creepiness is perfect to bring out Janet Leigh's unease and terror.
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Old 09-20-2018, 07:31 PM
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Personally, I thought that Heat (Michael Mann) could have been a better film just by rearranging some stuff. They build up how hard these guys are working to pull off a great heist and how much it means to their personal lives and so the big moment of the film is when it all falls apart.

Except the strongest scene in that vein is when Val Kilmer has to leave his wife, and that's like 30 minutes before the end of the movie and, between that point and the actual end there's a whole sequence where De Niro is tracking down the one trouble-maker and successfully rubbing him out, so the movie ends with a victory just before what should be the big ending, and the final downer point doesn't come across as well as Val Kilmer's scene from 30 minutes earlier. You want a film with a downer ending to be, really, in sort of an overall arc shape where everything gets better, better, better, peaks, and then goes down, down, down, tragedy. Rearranging it to be better, better, peaks, down, tragedy, better, down...just sort of doesn't work emotionally.

Removing the scene where they get the trouble-maker would have helped quite a lot, since it at least removes the small win in there at the end.

It probably would take more to make the film fully work; for example having De Niro work to protect and save his crew, failing at each step, rather than running off on his own and doing whatever. As is, we're never shown him doing anything terribly decent or worthy of caring about, except being very professional at his job, and that's not enough to make his end matter as much as the ends that come to his crew. Yet, it's presented as the ultimate tragedy. Minus redemption: No tragedy. He needed something to redeem himself, and taking out a rapist killer wasn't that. He didn't do it because the guy was bad, he did it because the guy mucked their job up. That is still just him being a professional, not a man redeemed.

Ah well. The movie starts great, but you may as well turn it off after Kilmer drives off, 30 minutes from the end.
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:30 PM
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It's not a whole scene, but there's one camera shot that always bothers me at the end of The Princess Bride. Westley has killed Rugen and reunited with Inigo. When Buttercup jumps out the window into the waiting arms of Fezzik, there's a shot of her jumping that's just gorgeous; white dress billowing against the midnight dark sky. And then it cuts to a shot of Robin Wright's face and it's just painfully obvious that it was done on a soundstage with her pretending to fall and a fan blowing her hair. In a movie with so many great action pieces, that one clumsy shot just jumps out at me every time.

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Originally Posted by Cardigan View Post
The are a number of things about Sergio Leone's "The Good the Bad and the Ugly" that qualify it as being probably the best the spaghetti western genre has to offer. Great cast, iconic theme song, good cinematography, interesting story.....but there is one scene that totally gets it wrong. I'm talking about the interrogation scene, where Lee Van Cleef's character roughs up Tuco while trying to find out where gold is hidden. Confederate soldiers are ordered to play music to drown out the sounds of the interrogation....and the soldiers are supposed to be crying out of sadness for some stranger getting beaten up. I'm sorry, but that's always struck me as hitting the wrong chord.
TGtBatU is a study in contrasts; Blondie and Tuco think they're alone in the wilderness, and suddenly they're in the middle of a huge Union Army encampment, that sort of thing. I think the interrogation scene was supposed to be in that vein, the contrast between Tuco's brutal beating and the mournful music. And doesn't one of the soldiers outside tell Blondie that all of them had been through a similar session with Angel Eyes? It wasn't just theoretical sympathy they felt for Tuco. They all remembered their own beatings in that room.

If there's a scene in that movie that seems out of place to me, it's Tuco's scene with his brother at the monastery where Blondie is being nursed back to health. I'm not sure we need a scene to humanize Tuco. He's already perfect as a craven conniving bandit.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:37 PM
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It's not a whole scene, but there's one camera shot that always bothers me at the end of The Princess Bride. Westley has killed Rugen and reunited with Inigo. When Buttercup jumps out the window into the waiting arms of Fezzik, there's a shot of her jumping that's just gorgeous; white dress billowing against the midnight dark sky. And then it cuts to a shot of Robin Wright's face and it's just painfully obvious that it was done on a soundstage with her pretending to fall and a fan blowing her hair. In a movie with so many great action pieces, that one clumsy shot just jumps out at me every time.
There's always the ending scene where Westley, Buttercup, Inigo, and Fezzik are all riding away on horses. It's blatantly obvious that it's a stunt double in place of Andre the Giant on the horse.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:13 PM
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I always think of two sequences that bugger up the whole film:

The actually rather fun The Shadow starts with a scene showing Lamont Cranston's past in the opium fields of China. It would have been far better to have started with a scene showing The Shadow in action, and let the background stuff emerge as flashbacks later (or maybe never ).

And of course, the very very bad decision to start Dark City with a voiceover explaining the whole damn plot.
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Old 09-21-2018, 07:20 AM
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The music video for "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.
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Old 09-21-2018, 09:15 AM
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The title character's 60's-style 'Charly Baby' revolt with motorbikes, women, and psychedelic shenanigans in Charly.
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Old 09-21-2018, 10:03 AM
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Here are the last two paragraphs of Roger Eberts' review of Thelma and Louise. He downgrades the movie from four stars to three and a half based entirely on the last seconds of the film:
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Originally Posted by Roger Ebert
I would have rated the movie at four stars, instead of three and a half, except for one shot, the last shot before the titles begin. This is the catharsis shot, the payoff, the moment when Thelma and Louise arrive at the truth that their whole journey has been pointed toward, and Scott and his editor, Thom Noble, botch it. Itís a freeze frame that fades to white, which is fine, except it does so with unseemly haste, followed immediately by a vulgar carnival of distractions: flashbacks to the jolly faces of the two women, the roll of the end credits, an upbeat country song.

Itís unsettling to get involved in a movie that takes 128 minutes to bring you to a payoff that the filmmakers seem to fear. If Scott and Mount had let the last shot run an additional seven to ten seconds, and then held the fade to white for a decent interval, they would have gotten the payoff they deserved. Can one shot make that big of a difference? This one does.
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Old 09-21-2018, 10:06 AM
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The other one I always cite is in Smokey and the Bandit, where Jerry Reed's character gets beaten up by bikers in a roadhouse, staggers out to his truck, grins evilly, and drives right over about ten parked bikes.


Works great - except that he, a dead-broke good old boy trucker, flashes a full set of Hollywood-perfect teeth. Takes me out of the moment every time.


(Although it was pointed out to me that he might well have a full set of dentures rather than immaculately maintained natural teeth.)
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Old 09-21-2018, 10:07 AM
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It's not a whole scene, but there's one camera shot that always bothers me at the end of The Princess Bride. Westley has killed Rugen and reunited with Inigo. When Buttercup jumps out the window into the waiting arms of Fezzik, there's a shot of her jumping that's just gorgeous; white dress billowing against the midnight dark sky. And then it cuts to a shot of Robin Wright's face and it's just painfully obvious that it was done on a soundstage with her pretending to fall and a fan blowing her hair. In a movie with so many great action pieces, that one clumsy shot just jumps out at me every time.
I always took that as one more silly wink-and-nod thing that pointed out that this was basically what a boy was imagining when his grandfather told him the story.
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Old 09-21-2018, 10:15 AM
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I always took that as one more silly wink-and-nod thing that pointed out that this was basically what a boy was imagining when his grandfather told him the story.
That is an interesting thought.
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Old 09-21-2018, 10:25 AM
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Royal Space Force: The Wings of HonnÍamise is a fantastic anime movie, but it's ruined by a scene where the main character attempts to rape a young woman, and the woman forgives him.
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Old 09-21-2018, 10:53 AM
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Even when watching Pulp Fiction the first time while in the theater, I wanted... needed... to fast-forward through the taxi cab scene with Bruce Willis and the cab driver.
Worth it to hear the cab driver speak. Her accent is hot.
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Old 09-21-2018, 11:18 AM
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I've mentioned this in other threads, but I've always hated the final scene in The Last Emperor with the tourist throngs swarming the Forbidden City and a tour guide's two sentence summary of Pu Yi's life. They really should have ended the movie with the previous scene, where Pu Yi give the little boy his old cricket cage, a cricket magically emerges from the cage, and the boy looks around to see that Pu Yi has disappeared. They could have replaced the tourist scene with a fade to black and a note telling us when Pu Yi died.
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Old 09-21-2018, 12:00 PM
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Jaws - death of Quint. Really can a shark eat you with half its body out of the water?
Agree--the fakeness of that scene broke the whole tension of the movie for me. A shark that size would have just bitten him in half, not munched on him like he was going over an ear of corn. And the mechanical shark was just not that convincing.
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Old 09-21-2018, 12:32 PM
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The scene in Predator where Mac (the black guy with a shaved head) takes the chaingun and fires into the jungle. Another scene involves Dutch plunging into a lake. Both of those scenes have a rough look to them, like they're a documentary shot on 16mm. I'm not sure why they look that way or why they were kept given how much their shoddiness contrasts with the rest of the extraordinary movie.

Both Predator and The Thing have a short scene at the beginning where we see a spaceship approaching earth. It would be much better if the makers (likely the producers) had trusted the audience a little. Keeping ambiguity at the beginning as to whether the villain is an alien or demonic would have made those movies better.


A missed opportunity in Terminator 2 would have been to make the T-800 kill people until he meets John Connor. There's no reason for the T-800 not to act exactly as it did in T1. Since the T-800 has a character arc involving being humanized by JC, starting him off less humane would have created more contrast between the start and end of his character arc and reinforced his journey. Seeing the T-800 kill people while not seeing the T-1000 kill people until they meet would have also strengthened the twist about the T-800 being good this time.
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Old 09-21-2018, 12:47 PM
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Worth it to hear the cab driver speak. Her accent is hot.
Yeah I don't love the scene, I think I was sufficiently distracted by that too.

The anal rape scene is one I could have done without. I guess it's important though to get Butch on somewhat balanced terms with Marcellus.
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Old 09-21-2018, 01:25 PM
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Any scene with Mickey Rooney in "Breakfast at Tiffany's." I think there are only two or three but they are painfully cringeworthy and they ruin the entire film.
Just what I came in to post. Gahhh.
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Old 09-21-2018, 02:16 PM
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A missed opportunity in Terminator 2 would have been to make the T-800 kill people until he meets John Connor. There's no reason for the T-800 not to act exactly as it did in T1. Since the T-800 has a character arc involving being humanized by JC, starting him off less humane would have created more contrast between the start and end of his character arc and reinforced his journey. Seeing the T-800 kill people while not seeing the T-1000 kill people until they meet would have also strengthened the twist about the T-800 being good this time.
I agree with this. It always annoyed me that he didn't kill everyone in the bar to get his clothes. He killed the dudes in the first movie to get clothes, why not this one? Did it have to do with the different ratings each film got?
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Old 09-21-2018, 03:53 PM
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I enjoyed Watchmen more than most people on the Internet, but that sex scene to "Hallelujah" - yikes.
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Old 09-21-2018, 04:23 PM
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The Great Escape could have done without the scenes of the Americans making moonshine.

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Worth it to hear the cab driver speak. Her accent is hot.
Everything about her was hot!
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Old 09-21-2018, 04:39 PM
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Speaking of Pulp Fiction, for me it was when Quentin Tarrentino was onscreen.

He wasn't a believable character in that universe. And using the N-word is not edgy, it's just sad coming from him.
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Old 09-21-2018, 04:51 PM
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Speaking of Pulp Fiction, for me it was when Quentin Tarrentino was onscreen.

He wasn't a believable character in that universe. And using the N-word is not edgy, it's just sad coming from him.
It's ruined because it should have been Steve Buscemi. Steve Buscemi could have sold that dialog, Tarentino can't.
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Old 09-21-2018, 05:55 PM
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I'll nominate the Liam Neeson remorse scene near the end of Schindler's List. I get that people may like the scene and/or feel it was a necessary release of Schindler's angst building through the film, but to me it stops the movie in its tracks at the wrong time for the wrong reasons.

It's completely against Schindler's character as portrayed throughout the story and it's unnecessarily maudlin when so much effort had been put into the story to communicate the horror at a more personal level. The movie had just spent 2 brilliant hours appealing to the audience's intelligence to show the Holocaust's impact in a visceral way I've never before experienced, and suddenly everything stops so we can have something explained to us that we had just learned in case we didn't get it. I found it jarring and it pulled me out of the story right at its culmination.

IMHO, of course. Admittedly it doesn't help that the movie set a high enough bar that any scene less than perfect is going to stand out!
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Old 09-21-2018, 06:14 PM
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I'll nominate the Liam Neeson remorse scene near the end of Schindler's List. I get that people may like the scene and/or feel it was a necessary release of Schindler's angst building through the film, but to me it stops the movie in its tracks at the wrong time for the wrong reasons.

It's completely against Schindler's character as portrayed throughout the story and it's unnecessarily maudlin when so much effort had been put into the story to communicate the horror at a more personal level. The movie had just spent 2 brilliant hours appealing to the audience's intelligence to show the Holocaust's impact in a visceral way I've never before experienced, and suddenly everything stops so we can have something explained to us that we had just learned in case we didn't get it. I found it jarring and it pulled me out of the story right at its culmination.

IMHO, of course. Admittedly it doesn't help that the movie set a high enough bar that any scene less than perfect is going to stand out!
Having the little girl (and the lighting of the candle near the end) be colorized really pissed me off.
  #40  
Old 09-22-2018, 12:59 AM
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I agree with this. It always annoyed me that he didn't kill everyone in the bar to get his clothes. He killed the dudes in the first movie to get clothes, why not this one? Did it have to do with the different ratings each film got?
I always figured he - I mean It! It - was programmed in the future by John Connor himself. Probably directed to kill only when absolutely necessary. Or something.

Last edited by TreacherousCretin; 09-22-2018 at 12:59 AM.
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Old 09-22-2018, 05:58 AM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is offline
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I always figured he - I mean It! It - was programmed in the future by John Connor himself. Probably directed to kill only when absolutely necessary. Or something.
I can see that although, given that the T-800 very nearly kills one of the two bros who come to John Connor's rescue when he yells; The T-800 only misses shooting him in the head because John Connor pushes the gun away, that seems unlikely.

JC changing the T-800 is part of JC's character arc too; He's such a paragon of virtue that he can humanize a machine; That's why JC is the savior to lead humanity through the apocalypse.

Last edited by MichaelEmouse; 09-22-2018 at 05:59 AM.
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by control-z View Post
The anal rape scene is one I could have done without. I guess it's important though to get Butch on somewhat balanced terms with Marcellus.
If Butch had just left the pawnshop, Marcellus would be dead and all his problems would be over. That scene was a callback to Butch's childhood when he got his father's watch. When Butch broke the chair he was tied to, punched the Gimp, and was on his way out, he remembered what Capt. Koons told him when he was a boy. When two men are in captivity together they take on certain obligations to each other. That's when he started looking for a weapon to go back in and rescue Marcellus. That's what the watch meant to Butch, and when he passes it on to his son that will become his chapter in the story of how it has been passed through the generations.
  #43  
Old 09-22-2018, 11:27 AM
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TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by MichaelEmouse View Post
I can see that although, given that the T-800 very nearly kills one of the two bros who come to John Connor's rescue when he yells; The T-800 only misses shooting him in the head because John Connor pushes the gun away, that seems unlikely.
Protecting young JC is the T-800's primary directive. It's not as if the T-800 is slaughtering anybody who doesn't get out of its way. Whatever. Our opinions differ, and you may be right.
  #44  
Old 09-22-2018, 11:56 AM
Brawndo with Electrolytes Brawndo with Electrolytes is offline
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Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
Even when watching Pulp Fiction the first time while in the theater, I wanted... needed... to fast-forward through the taxi cab scene with Bruce Willis and the cab driver.
The dialog is pretty excruciating. Although the thing that always bothered me about that scene is more toward the OCD end: The cab itself looks like it's from 1958 or so. What is this, Cuba all of a sudden? Why is she driving a cab from the 50s? You're forced to acknowledge that a concession was made, contrary to realism, for the sake of the romance of it. So you're thinking about Tarantino's decisions, not the world of the movie.

Speaking of Tarantino intruding on the movie, the scene where he plays "Jimmy" and goes on and on about "dead nigger storage" is kind of shit too. And now that I mention it, when he's "Mr. Brown" in Reservoir Dogs talking about Madonna, that sort of sucks too. Hitchcock was in (almost?) every one of his own movies but at least he had the sense to keep his damn mouth shut and let the actors do the acting.
  #45  
Old 09-22-2018, 11:58 AM
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Interesting, odd little confection - Leolo - had an extremely ill-advised "gang initiation" cat rape scene, especially the shot, at scene's end, of the cat, on its side, looking like it was having a fucking seizure, hyperventilating, tongue out. Off-putting as shit, I can absolutely assure you.

On the same note, whenever animals were mistreated in Peter Greenaway's Zed and Two Noughts AND The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover.
  #46  
Old 09-22-2018, 12:08 PM
Brawndo with Electrolytes Brawndo with Electrolytes is offline
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Originally Posted by Cardigan View Post
...and the soldiers are supposed to be crying out of sadness for some stranger getting beaten up. I'm sorry, but that's always struck me as hitting the wrong chord.
No pun intended! Wocka wocka!

Seriously though, I think it's just the violin player who breaks down... going from memory there. But when you consider they've probably been made to do this many times, to play music while somebody is tortured, the guy has plenty to be sad about. First of all, he's in a POW camp. Secondly, his fellows are routinely tortured. And third, he's been forced to be an accomplice in the torture. And fourth, he is made an accomplice specifically through the perversion of what once, presumably, brought him joy, which was the playing of music.

Last edited by Brawndo with Electrolytes; 09-22-2018 at 12:10 PM.
  #47  
Old 09-22-2018, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by campp View Post
Speaking of Pulp Fiction, for me it was when Quentin Tarrentino was onscreen.
You can say that for just about any Tarrentino film when he's on screen.
  #48  
Old 09-22-2018, 02:41 PM
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The last scene(s) in AI: Artificial Intelligence. Should have ended with him waiting forever underwater.

Not a whole scene but one little piece of business. Princes father is abusing his mother in Purple Rain and Prince runs to protect her like a little bitch in high heeled boots-- totally kills the very serious vibe for me.
  #49  
Old 09-22-2018, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Sage Rat View Post
It probably would take more to make the film fully work; for example having De Niro work to protect and save his crew, failing at each step, rather than running off on his own and doing whatever. As is, we're never shown him doing anything terribly decent or worthy of caring about, except being very professional at his job
How would any of that jive with his mantra/ethos, "You got to be ready to leave in 30 seconds flat when the heat is around the corner"?

I know he failed at it anyway by going for the big score despite knowing the cops were on them, and by going for Waingro despite the cops really being on him, but still, those were things he did for himself while working to protect and save the crew wouldn't match with the whole concept of the "heat".
  #50  
Old 09-22-2018, 03:04 PM
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The "stir the tanks" argument scene in Apollo 13. It never happened. I know why it was fabricated, but Ron Howard didn't need to. Showing the calm, calculated resolve of the astronauts after the explosion would have improved the movie.
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