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Old 09-20-2018, 08:29 AM
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What new to you food most disappointed you?

Here I'm talking about some food item you became aware of without actually eating it, as in from novels or movies, and all the mentions made it sound wonderful and you were super eager to try it. And then, possibly years later, you finally got to eat this marvelous thing... and you reaction was something on the spectrum from "ugh!" to "meh."

As a school child I grew up reading English books and tons of them included loving descriptions of the wonders of tea. Well, not the tea so much, as the glorious items that got served along with it. Whether at Tea Shops or served by livery-clad retainers in Great Houses or just school kids over there salivating over sneaking treats at their schools. Everyone raved over how marvelous it was, and I was consumed with envy.

Fast forward to college days when I came across an announcement that a hotel in the nearby city would now be hosting 'proper' English teas on weekends. I headed there the first weekend I could talk my roommate (she had a car, unlike me) into sharing this delight with me.

Verdict: meh.

The magically named fairy cakes are just ordinary cupcakes. Scones are just rather crumbly but sweeter biscuits. Most disappointing of all were the crumpets. Really?? *THOSE* are what Lord Peter and a million school kids slavered for?

I apologized to my roomie for dragging her there.


So, how about the rest of you? What untasted food got built up in your mind into ambrosia, only to have the reality leave you crushed?
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:40 AM
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Foie gras and caviar. Don't care if I have either of those things ever again. Both were just meh to me.
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:49 AM
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Another example from BritLit. In the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Edmund sells out his siblings for Turkish Delight. Whoa... it's from The Mysterious Far East, home of exotic words like Mohammedans and The Byzantine. And it's clearly a delight...

Forty years later, I'm intrigued by a plate of powdered rectangles of goopy sugar jellies at a party in Seattle. These "Aplets & Cotlets" are too sweet for anyone else, but I think they're not too bad. A friend sidles up and says "These were invented by Turks who were harvesting apples and apricots in Eastern Washington." "Okay..." "So you realize, you're eating Turkish Delight?"

Really? The evil queen of Narnia controlled people by bribing them with ordinary sweets?

Last edited by digs; 09-20-2018 at 08:51 AM.
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:51 AM
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Dragon Fruit. I was so excited to taste something so new and different and pretty, red curly skin with a white shiny inside, speckled with cute little seeds.

And it was a big mouthful of nothing. A wet raw potato is the best way to describe the flavor.

I later heard that Dragon Fruit is prized for how it looks laying sliced on a salad. Yeah, style over substance, what else is new? Only with fashion that's fine. With food, it sucks.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:00 AM
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Truffles. White, black, whatever; I must be one of those rare people who are unable to taste them, because they taste of absolutely nothing to me.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:03 AM
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I was a big fan of Agatha Christie. They'd have "house parties" and everyone would come down to breakfast and there'd be an array of "stuff" to eat which I always thought was something special. Kedgeree is pretty ordinary stuff and kippers are horrible little dried up salted fish things. I was very disappointed when I discovered what these things really were. (and for breakfast? urgh, no thanks.)
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:05 AM
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I later heard that Dragon Fruit is prized for how it looks laying sliced on a salad. Yeah, style over substance, what else is new? Only with fashion that's fine. With food, it sucks.
Yeah, that was an $8 lesson I learned a few years back. It's beautiful, but utterly flavorless. I compare it to the whitest part of a watermelon rind, with the texture of the sweet red part, but with no sweetness, or any other flavor for that matter, to speak of.

And every time I mention this online I get a bunch of responses to the effect of "You got a bad one!" These people are all completely full of shit. Probably getting paid by "Big Dragon Fruit" to post those comments.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:13 AM
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Scallops just never did very much for me. I'm not a huge seafood fan at the best of times but even a perfectly seared scallop is ignorable. Mild flavor, meaningless texture and where I live, HUGELY over priced. Similar to DCnDC'c "bad one" comment, people often tell me that I just have not had one properly prepared and that if I go to their particular favorite restaurant then I'd love them. They often openly, gleefully hate the idea that I think I'm allowed to not adore something that they know is the absolute perfect food. I just don't get it.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:16 AM
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Another BritLit fail for me.

I forget what I was reading exactly, but macaroons and meringues figured prominently. When I got to try them, meh. Nothing special at all.

On the flip side, from watching food shows, I had heard of Scrapple and I thought it looked interesting. I was at a food festival a couple of years ago, and some folks from Delaware were making Scrapple to give out as samples. I got to try it for the first time and was impressed.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:17 AM
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Dragon Fruit. I was so excited to taste something so new and different and pretty, red curly skin with a white shiny inside, speckled with cute little seeds.

And it was a big mouthful of nothing. A wet raw potato is the best way to describe the flavor.

I later heard that Dragon Fruit is prized for how it looks laying sliced on a salad. Yeah, style over substance, what else is new? Only with fashion that's fine. With food, it sucks.
Was coming in to post this - had it on a recent trip to Hawaii and felt the exact same way.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:21 AM
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Jamaican “browning.”

I love West Indian brown stewed chicken with rice and peas when I get Island takeout, and have tried several times to make my own...but I never get the rich deep color (or flavor), even if I start the stew by browning sugar in the pan. So I splurged on a $1.50 bottle of Jamaican Choice “BROWNING: Taste of the Islands.”

It’s certainly no magic ingredient. The chicken did brown, way too much (only used a tablespoon or two of the sauce), and didn’t get the deep flavor at all.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:23 AM
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I had half a Dragon Fruit for dessert last night. The texture was creamy, like flan, and the flavor was subtly sweet.

You just got a bad one!
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:27 AM
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Another example from BritLit. In the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Edmund sells out his siblings for Turkish Delight. Whoa... it's from The Mysterious Far East, home of exotic words like Mohammedans and The Byzantine. And it's clearly a delight...
I really thought this would be first. C.S. Lewis hoodwinked a lot of us poor impressionable Americans! I'm going back to imagining it as something more akin to Wonka's Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:27 AM
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Avocados - I know they're common, but I had never eaten one until sometime last year. It seems like avocados are everywhere lately. One day my friend and I were walking together and she mentioned she loves sliced avocados on her turkey sandwich. I said - "Really? I've never had one". She told me how delicious they were. The next day she brought me one. I was kind of excited to give it a try. So that evening I made my self a turkey sandwich with VERY thin (I was a little skittish about it) sliced avocado. I took my first bite and it was just tasteless with a kind of mooshy texture. I don't know what the big to do is about avocados.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:28 AM
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Ahhh speaking of caribbean, jerk chicken. Way too little spice even when I could see chunks of habanero/bonnet in my chicken.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:29 AM
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I had heard of Scrapple and I thought it looked interesting. I was at a food festival a couple of years ago, and some folks from Delaware were making Scrapple to give out as samples. I got to try it for the first time and was impressed.
I love scrapple! Just on general principal though, it's easy to make tasty food when you don't give the slightest XXXX about limiting your fat, salt and carb intake. People who eat scrapple on a regular basis may die at fifty but they die happy.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:31 AM
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“Kedgeree” is an unholy mix of smoked fish, rice, curry powder, and raisins...a prime example of British people fucking up a colonial indigenous cuisine. I have never eaten it or wanted to try it. Gawd help us all.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:34 AM
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“Kedgeree” is an unholy mix of
don't forget the boiled eggs....
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:34 AM
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I love scrapple! Just on general principal though, it's easy to make tasty food when you don't give the slightest XXXX about limiting your fat, salt and carb intake. People who eat scrapple on a regular basis may die at fifty but they die happy.
There's an "Apple Scrapple Festival" in Delaware next month. I'm totally going.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:40 AM
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There's an "Apple Scrapple Festival" in Delaware next month. I'm totally going.
Oh man, I wish I could go. Next choice is to make a pan for myself. Time to buy some tasty pig bits!
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:44 AM
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Foie gras and caviar. Don't care if I have either of those things ever again. Both were just meh to me.
Pretty much the same here. I had caviar* a few times and it was OK, but too salty for me. Had foie gras for the first time last week, and again it was OK, but only as a taste or two. I'd much rather have one of a dozen types of cheese. Both were at fairly good restaurants, so I assume I was getting "the good stuff".

*Tobiko is fine, though. Love the stuff sprinkled on certain Japanese dishes.

Last edited by John Mace; 09-20-2018 at 09:46 AM.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:53 AM
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don't forget the boiled eggs....
That’s the GOOD part. If someone served me kedgeree I might remove the eggs, wipe off any curry powder, and try to make breakfast out of ‘em.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:53 AM
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I think the combination of the English being really great at literature and really lousy at cooking is responsible for a lot of disappointment.

Kippers in the USA are not dried they are canned or rather "tinned". I have an attachment to *our* kippers on Swedish flatbread dating from my childhood. The idea of combining them with frankly almost anything is disturbing but raisins? God help us.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:56 AM
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“Kedgeree” is an unholy mix of smoked fish, rice, curry powder, and raisins...a prime example of British people fucking up a colonial indigenous cuisine. I have never eaten it or wanted to try it. Gawd help us all.
What? Nooooo. Kedgeree is delicious!! No raisons though, don't know where you got that from.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:07 AM
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“Sultanas,” then. I was translating from English to American.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:08 AM
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Ahhh speaking of caribbean, jerk chicken. Way too little spice even when I could see chunks of habanero/bonnet in my chicken.
You haven't had my jerk chicken I see!

But heat level varies all over the map depending on where you get it. It is perhaps my favorite preparation of chicken, even if it's not made really hot spicy, because of all the other flavors going on (especially that allspice.) That said, the most popular commercial brand of paste, Walkerswood, is pretty darned hot. Even the "mild" is something I would call "hot" by American standards.

I definitely agree on dragonfruit. Pretty, but pretty useless flavor-wise, but there's a number of varieties of them, and I haven't tried them all. I've just had them here and in Mexico and every one I've had has been bland and just uninteresting. Not like guanabana which is fantastic, but a bit of a pain in the ass to eat and expensive as hell.

Truffles tasting like nothing is odd to me. They are pungent as all get-out. Even that truffle salt I feel like I could smell it clear across the room when a jar is opened up.

The one that kind of is a let-down to me, even though I still eat it, is Binghamton's regional spiedies. It's just chicken or pork (or apparently lamb was the original meat) skewers marinaded in what essentially is Italian dressing. And it's served (traditionally) on a slice of Italian white bread and not topped with anything. I mean, I do have a certain fondness for it, I guess, but the first time I had them a few years ago, I was like "That's it?"
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:12 AM
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“Sultanas,” then. I was translating from English to American.
No shrivelled fruit items are part of kedgeree.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:20 AM
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For a couple of items mentioned here, scallops and avocados, I'm going to suggest that they share a quality of being mild or subtle in flavor. For some people, their tastes and eating habits don't include mild or subtle flavored foods as part of their regular pallette. So, they would be less inclined to appreciate the things like scallops and avocados.

Similar to me, being on the flip-side I don't appreciate spicy foods. So, the current trend for spicy everything is lost on me. If I am encourages to try something by an aficionado, or compare this spicy food to that spicy food, I am worthless. All I get is "HOT! HOT!" and miss whatever flavor is there.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:28 AM
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I tried avocado once, tasted just like soapy dish water to me.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:32 AM
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Another example from BritLit. In the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Edmund sells out his siblings for Turkish Delight.
It's been 35 years but the disappointment of Turkish Delight still stings. My parents took a trip to the UK and brought back this exotic delicacy. The enormous buildup from the book and difficulty in acquiring made the letdown especially harsh.

Dragon fruit is basically garnish. Pretty and edible but not really meant to be eaten.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:32 AM
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Regarding scallops, I really like them myself but no, they don't have very much flavor on their own. For me it's more about texture; I like that soft, springy, chewy bite. What flavor there is, to me, is mainly just salt. Actually, that's pretty much the way I feel about almost all seafood. I love it, but it's all very subtle, flavor-wise.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:37 AM
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In one of my favorite novels, the lead character is a stickler for "properly aged" steaks.

A couple of years ago, two restaurants in my town started advertising aged steaks. One of them even installed their own aging room, and had a big write-up in the newspaper about how much care they took in selecting the best cuts, carefully aging them for X days, etc., etc., etc. For my birthday that year, I asked to be taken out for one of those.

On the first bite, I thought it was just like Mom used to make . . . when she was cleaning out the refrigerator, and trying to get rid of stuff that was in danger of spoiling.

Back to the middle-class family steakhouses for me.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:45 AM
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My family didn't have a lot of money so lobster was something that was held up as the absolute height of luxury. We certainly never had occasion to try it when I was living at home. Years later I was dating this guy who was shocked that I'd never had lobster so he took me out as a special treat and... I didn't get it. It was fine but nothing remarkable. I actually felt really guilty that I wasn't more excited by it because he'd clearly gone to a lot of effort and expense!
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:53 AM
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Eggplant! I know, right? Years ago, my wife and I went to our favorite Italian place, figuring if anyone could get it right for our first try at eggplant, it would be them. And they probably did it perfectly, but we both hated it. Hated it! It was like eating a big, tasteless booger! We apologized to the staff and ordered something else and insisted on paying for the eggplant entrees, but they would have none of that; they comped the eggplant meals and brought us a free dessert. I felt so bad for them; not their fault we ordered something new and unusual. And awful.


And scrapple rules!
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:53 AM
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On my first trip to Japan, people were telling me how great the sushi is over there, not like what you can get in the USA, it is so much better and some of it has RAW FISH it it.
So I get over there, and I try both the cooked and raw versions... meh, tasted no better than the all-you-can-eat sushi place down the street. And raw fish tastes like... fish.

I admit, this second one might be because I don't care for beer. But again, on my first trip to Germany, everybody was telling me how great the beer was, and so much better than American beer.
It tasted like beer. Would not drink it again.
The chocolate, on the other hand, was much better than American chocolate.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:57 AM
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“Kedgeree” is an unholy mix of smoked fish, rice, curry powder, and raisins...a prime example of British people fucking up a colonial indigenous cuisine. I have never eaten it or wanted to try it. Gawd help us all.
I had it once. Loved it. Would have it again, but that restaurant closed, and that dish is hard to find.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:58 AM
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I had it once. Loved it. Would have it again, but that restaurant closed, and that dish is hard to find.
It's easy to cook!
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:00 AM
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*Tobiko is fine, though. Love the stuff sprinkled on certain Japanese dishes.
My exception in the fish-egg department is bottarga, sprinkled on spaghetti. I like the texture, and it really does taste like the sea!
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:12 AM
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I admit, this second one might be because I don't care for beer. But again, on my first trip to Germany, everybody was telling me how great the beer was, and so much better than American beer.
It tasted like beer. Would not drink it again.
The chocolate, on the other hand, was much better than American chocolate.
Hoo, I had the same experience with German beer. The only difference from American beer is German beer is more potent. Taste? It's the same. I guess getting drunk faster is a selling point for certain people, but not me.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:17 AM
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French macarons, a pretty cookie (NOT a macaroon). They sounded very exotic and tasty, made with almond flour, coming in various flavors, and very labor intensive to make. We looked at a Martha Stewart recipe and it seemed very complex, so when they showed up at a shop near us, I bought us some. Four for $7! Pricey! they must be a real treat right? Wrong. .... Very disappointing, very bland, just sweet. I liked the texture, but they weren't all that.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:19 AM
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I really thought this would be first. C.S. Lewis hoodwinked a lot of us poor impressionable Americans! I'm going back to imagining it as something more akin to Wonka's Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight.
Never try Wonka-brand candy, then, because hoo boy.

Turkish delight was a disappointment to me, but I had it in the third grade and experienced (and got over) the disappointment pretty quickly.

Then as an adult I saw it on the dessert menu of a local Middle Eastern restaurant. Their homemade Turkish delight, studded with pistachios and served alongside strong coffee? Yeah, I could see selling out my family for that.

Another disappointment was uni (sea urchin gonads served as sushi)--not because I had such high hopes for it, but because my upbeat curiosity was so cruelly dashed against the rocks of its "Bugs Bunny's lung biopsy" texture. So orange, so mucousy, so revolting. I ordered it a second time, years later, to see if I was wrong. I was not.

My favorite food disappointment wasn't mine, it was my cousin-in-law-once-removed or something. My wife and I visited their family and went out to a restaurant. The one-year-old watched in fascination as my wife slurped down her plate of mussels, and finally my wife asked her cousin if the little kid could try one.

She said yes, so my wife gave one to the baby, and over about twenty seconds her face went through stages:

Delight
Anticipation
Chewing
Thoughtfulness
Concern
Panic
Outrage
Utter betrayal

She burst into distraught sobs, while the rest of us tried to contain our terrible mirth.

Last edited by Left Hand of Dorkness; 09-20-2018 at 11:23 AM.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:38 AM
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Kale - It's supposed to be some kind of wonder green that everybody's nuts for. I tried it and it tasted like sugar-coated rubber.

Frappacino - Supposed to be the nectar of coffees. Tasted like a sugar-coated ashtray to me.

Poutine - Wasn't bad, gravy and cheese curds on french fries, but I decided a southern climate wasn't good for it. Cold and snowy outside, sure, the starch content will heat up your blood. In 90+ degree weather, you sweat like a whore in church.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:50 AM
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Hoo, I had the same experience with German beer. The only difference from American beer is German beer is more potent. Taste? It's the same. I guess getting drunk faster is a selling point for certain people, but not me.
Not really. Most German lagers (and I'm assuming you are having Pils/Lager style beers if you're describing them as tasting the same) are around 5% abv, like American beers. Maybe some come close to 5.5%, but that's not going to make much of a difference in terms of feeling drunk faster. For example, Radeberger Pils is 4.8%, HB (Hofbräu) Original is 5.1%, Warsteiner (typical German mass-market beer) is 4.8%, Bitburger is 4.8%, Paulaner Original is 4.9%, etc. To compare, American Bud is 5%, MGD is 4.7%, Coors (not Light) is 5%, PBR is 4.7%, Busch is low at 4.3%, Old Style is 4.6% etc. (Then you have the "Ice" beers which are in the high 5s.)

Now, sure, once you venture outside the lagers and pils, you'll get more punch, but you'll get more punch in American beers, too, if you venture outside mass market lager/pils style beers, too (if anything, American brewers tend to overpower their beers alcoholwise vs their European counterparts when it comes to other styles.)
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:52 AM
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Hoo, I had the same experience with German beer. The only difference from American beer is German beer is more potent. Taste? It's the same. I guess getting drunk faster is a selling point for certain people, but not me.
That's not even true, at least not in any significant way. Mass-market US beer is usually in the 4-6% abv range, with most common German beers settling in the top half of that range (5-6% abv).

What is typically true is that German beers are considerably more intense because they're made from 100% malted barley and usually add more hops than mass-market US beer, which is typically about 40-50% corn or rice, and have minimal hops added.

I suppose it could be that you don't drink a lot of beer and even our mass market beer is perceived as bitter; if that's the case, I can see how German beer might not seem much different.

But you can't take say... Paulaner Pilsner and compare it to say... Budweiser and say they taste the same; although they're ostensibly in the same style, there's a lot of difference in the flavor and the intensity of flavor.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:54 AM
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Kale - It's supposed to be some kind of wonder green that everybody's nuts for. I tried it and it tasted like sugar-coated rubber.
What kind of kale are you eating that it tastes sugary? I mean, I can take it or leave it, but it's like everything the opposite of sweet to me.

Quote:
Frappacino - Supposed to be the nectar of coffees. Tasted like a sugar-coated ashtray to me.
Frappacinos are a coffee milkshake for people who actually don't like coffee. Definitely not the nectar of coffees.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:57 AM
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To be fair to British literature, a lot of it may have been coloured by the authors' experiences of rationing during WWII and the early post-war years (1939-1954), which made modest foodstuffs, such as perhaps a cautiously-flavoured confectionery, something of a rare delight and almost unimaginable treat.
  #47  
Old 09-20-2018, 11:58 AM
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Scallops just never did very much for me. I'm not a huge seafood fan at the best of times but even a perfectly seared scallop is ignorable. Mild flavor, meaningless texture and where I live, HUGELY over priced. Similar to DCnDC'c "bad one" comment, people often tell me that I just have not had one properly prepared and that if I go to their particular favorite restaurant then I'd love them. They often openly, gleefully hate the idea that I think I'm allowed to not adore something that they know is the absolute perfect food. I just don't get it.
Those were probably sea scallops. Bay scallops are much better, with far more flavor.
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:00 PM
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Durian. It's a southeast Asian fruit notorious for smelling like rotting garbage but tasting like ambrosia.

Alfred Wallace described it like this:

Quote:
When brought into a house the smell is often so offensive that some persons can never bear to taste it...[The] pulp is the eatable part, and its consistence and flavour are indescribable. A rich butter-like custard highly flavoured with almonds gives the best general idea of it, but intermingled with it come wafts of flavour that call to mind cream-cheese, onion-sauce, brown sherry, and other incongruities. Then there is a rich glutinous smoothness in the pulp which nothing else possesses, but which adds to its delicacy. It is neither acid, nor sweet, nor juicy, yet one feels the want of none of these qualities, for it is perfect as it is.
I had a chance to taste some on a recent trip to Malaysia, and the smell wasn't nearly as disgusting, nor the taste so exquisite, as I had been led to believe.

The smell was kind of musty, like old socks, but no worse than a lot of cheeses (and not nearly as bad as Limburger). I liked the taste OK, but wouldn't go out of my way for it. It was kind of like custard with a faint tang of onion. I was quite disappointed on both counts.
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:03 PM
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Those were probably sea scallops. Bay scallops are much better, with far more flavor.
Stranger things have happened. I'm not a huge fan of the whole "Fresh is king" food movement but I can certainly see the point for seafood. I live over a 1,000 miles from the nearest ocean and I'm just not going to find the good stuff up here. I'm headed for the East U.S. coast early next year for a family trip. Maybe I can find some decent ones there.
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:26 PM
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Here I'm talking about some food item you became aware of without actually eating it, as in from novels or movies, and all the mentions made it sound wonderful and you were super eager to try it. And then, possibly years later, you finally got to eat this marvelous thing... and you reaction was something on the spectrum from "ugh!" to "meh."

As a school child I grew up reading English books and tons of them included loving descriptions of the wonders of tea. Well, not the tea so much, as the glorious items that got served along with it. Whether at Tea Shops or served by livery-clad retainers in Great Houses or just school kids over there salivating over sneaking treats at their schools. Everyone raved over how marvelous it was, and I was consumed with envy.

Fast forward to college days when I came across an announcement that a hotel in the nearby city would now be hosting 'proper' English teas on weekends. I headed there the first weekend I could talk my roommate (she had a car, unlike me) into sharing this delight with me.

Verdict: meh.

The magically named fairy cakes are just ordinary cupcakes. Scones are just rather crumbly but sweeter biscuits. Most disappointing of all were the crumpets. Really?? *THOSE* are what Lord Peter and a million school kids slavered for?

I apologized to my roomie for dragging her there.


So, how about the rest of you? What untasted food got built up in your mind into ambrosia, only to have the reality leave you crushed?
I wouldn't judge British afternoon tea by what an American hotel is likely to offer. If you get the chance to try again in Britain, please do.

Fairy cakes are, I think, mostly intended for children. Scones are, as you say, similar in texture to American biscuits and are intended as a sturdy vehicle for such things as clotted cream and jam. Crumpets need to be toasted until crisp (often served too limp in the US) and are a vehicle for delicious melted butter. These are not fantasy foods, they are just everyday accompaniments to the tea, for a small meal intended to tide you over to your late dinner. You might also find dainty sandwiches on very thin bread, or cake and other pastries. Note that afternoon tea is different from "high" tea, which has been the evening meal for lower class families.

Last edited by Roderick Femm; 09-20-2018 at 12:26 PM.
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