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Old 11-05-2018, 06:38 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Things which aren't from where their name suggests

Simple idea: I'm English so I'm well aware that in London, nobody knows what a London Broil is. The name is spurious, however tasty the beef may be.

There's a product in the UK - maybe elsewhere too - called French Mustard, which is not French, but was invented in England. It's (understandably) sometimes confused with the genuinely French Dijon Mustard, but isn't dijon, and isn't French.

A Danish friend of mine tells me that Danish Pastries are known as Viennese Bread (but in Danish) in Denmark, because nobody there believes they're indigenous. Maybe slightly disingenuous, that one, because they are now a Danish speciality, but still, there's sort of a fake origin story in the name.

So, in the spirit of fighting ignorance: what else isn't from the place enshrined within its name? I don't just mean the various stories about curries invented in the UK which thus masquerade as Indian, unless they're called something like Bangalore Chicken but were invented in Leicester. I'm specifically looking for misleading geographical names.

The examples given are culinary, but I'll take answers about anything!

Last edited by Yorkshire Pudding; 11-05-2018 at 06:40 AM.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:48 AM
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Scotch eggs are not from Scotland at all.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:51 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Russian dressing.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:54 AM
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Moon Pies :-)
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:06 AM
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French Fries.
French Dip (the sandwich)
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:24 AM
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The Diet of Worms.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:24 AM
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German chocolate cake. Named after somebody with that surname IIRC.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:25 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Originally Posted by Grrr! View Post
French Dip (the sandwich)
I felt that instinctively when I first heard of it: its American popularity coupled with my never having heard of it till adulthood (despite being pretty conversant with France's culinary exports to the UK) gave me doubts. It just doesn't feel like a French thing, somehow!
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:26 AM
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German chocolate cake. Named after somebody with that surname IIRC.
What's German Chocolate Cake?
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:27 AM
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Moon Pies :-)
And Mars Bars too, presumably.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Telperion View Post
The Diet of Worms.
That was actually at Worms. (At least the famous one.)

The Spanish Steps, on the other hand...

Last edited by DPRK; 11-05-2018 at 07:31 AM.
  #12  
Old 11-05-2018, 07:35 AM
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Guinea pigs aren't from Guinea.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:41 AM
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Turkeys, for that matter.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:47 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Guinea pigs aren't from Guinea.
It's a "meerschweinchen" in German: a little sea pig. I don't know that they're aquatic either.

Or pigs, for that matter.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:51 AM
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In the USA, at least, "Chinese food" and "Mexican food" and "Italian food." This probably goes for most ethnic food in the USA, come to think of it.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:54 AM
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Bourbon Whiskey, I guess, now I come to think of it.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:56 AM
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Panama hats are from Ecuador.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:57 AM
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Australian shepherd dogs came from the western US.

OTOH Aussie cattle dogs are from Australia
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:58 AM
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Jerusalem artichoke.
Jerusalem cricket.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:59 AM
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Canadian Bacon - American name for cured/smoked ham sliced into circular slabs in America but is of British/Irish cuisine.

Canadians just call it "ham". Some Canadians call back bacon or peameal bacon "Canadian Bacon" but it is not the same thing at all.

FTR, "American Bacon" is know just as "bacon" or "streaky bacon" in Canada, the UK, et. al.
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Old 11-05-2018, 08:00 AM
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Jerusalem artichoke.
Which isn't an artichoke either.
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Old 11-05-2018, 08:06 AM
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Philadelphia Cream Cheese
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Old 11-05-2018, 08:06 AM
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Labrador retrievers actually originated on the island of Newfoundland. They and Newfoundland dogs share an origin in the St John's water dog.
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Old 11-05-2018, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by DPRK View Post
Turkeys, for that matter.
Right. Everyone gets this wrong, but in different ways. In French, Turkeys are literally “from India” (dinde).
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Old 11-05-2018, 08:42 AM
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Chinese Checkers

Indian (when referring to native Americans)

Causasian
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
What's German Chocolate Cake?
It is a chocolate cake with coconut in it. Damned swallows....

Black Forest cake is, however, most likely from Germany.
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:12 AM
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Bourbon Whiskey, I guess, now I come to think of it.
No. It originated in Bourbon County, Kentucky.
  #28  
Old 11-05-2018, 09:19 AM
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Vichyssoise, the cold soup we know today, was invented in New York. It was, however, based on a similar hot soup that really indeed come from Vichy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
What's German Chocolate Cake?
It's a chocolate (but not very chocolatey) cake topped with a sticky and very sweet topping made from coconut and pecans. It's named for an American brand of baking chocolate, Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate. The brand in turn was named for Samuel German who developed that type of chocolate, and James Baker who owned the company that sold it.
  #29  
Old 11-05-2018, 09:23 AM
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Vienna sausages!
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:25 AM
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AFAIK, Kansas City strip steak doesn't really have anything to do with Kansas City, although a New York strip does have some relationship to New York.
  #31  
Old 11-05-2018, 09:28 AM
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No. It originated in Bourbon County, Kentucky.
It may have done, it may not. One story is that it was called "Old Bourbon Whiskey" because it came from the area known as "Old Bourbon" (where Bourbon County in Virginia had been), another has it named for Bourbon Street in New Orleans. Others say other things. There's no definitive documented history though, and no requirement for it to come from Bourbon County now; it just needs to be from the US.
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:31 AM
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Vichyssoise, the cold soup we know today, was invented in New York. It was, however, based on a similar hot soup that really indeed come from Vichy.

It's a chocolate (but not very chocolatey) cake topped with a sticky and very sweet topping made from coconut and pecans. It's named for an American brand of baking chocolate, Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate. The brand in turn was named for Samuel German who developed that type of chocolate, and James Baker who owned the company that sold it.
Oh...OK. I guess I'd vaguely encountered the American phrase "German Chocolate Cake", but assumed it was another name for Black Forest Gateau.
  #33  
Old 11-05-2018, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
It may have done, it may not. One story is that it was called "Old Bourbon Whiskey" because it came from the area known as "Old Bourbon" (where Bourbon County in Virginia had been), another has it named for Bourbon Street in New Orleans. Others say other things. There's no definitive documented history though, and no requirement for it to come from Bourbon County now; it just needs to be from the US.
Even if so, that doesn't change my point that it originated in a place named "Bourbon" and is named after the place it originated in.

Caesar Salad has nothing to do with any Roman emperor.
  #34  
Old 11-05-2018, 10:12 AM
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Scotch tape
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Old 11-05-2018, 10:21 AM
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Interesting Thread name/poster combination, although Yorkshire Pudding does seem to have originated in northern England, possibly even in Yorkshire.


I recall a TV show about sexual matters back in the 1970s that observed that everybody named venereal diseases after some other country. syphilis was "The French Disease" to the British (and in Naples), the "Spanish Disease" by the French, and IIRC, "The Polish Disease" by the Russians.

Similarly, a Condom was called a "French letter" in the US (and, I think, Britain)


I'll bet a Mexican standoff isn't even Mexican

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_standoff
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Old 11-05-2018, 10:22 AM
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In the US we have French's Mustard, which is not to be confused with the UK's French Mustard. And of course, as the OP noted, neither are from France.

In fact if you go to the French's Mustard Web site, their current tagline is "Not From France".
  #37  
Old 11-05-2018, 10:38 AM
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Tabasco sauce isn't from the Mexican state of Tabasco.
  #38  
Old 11-05-2018, 10:49 AM
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Hawaiian pizza was invented by a Greek man in Canada.
  #39  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:03 AM
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Right. Everyone gets this wrong, but in different ways. In French, Turkeys are literally “from India” (dinde).
In Hebrew, too ("hodu"). In addition to "turkey" and "India", hodu is also the plural of "give thanks". Busy word, that.
  #40  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:08 AM
Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire Pudding is offline
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Even if so, that doesn't change my point that it originated in a place named "Bourbon" and is named after the place it originated in.

Caesar Salad has nothing to do with any Roman emperor.
A fair point, in both cases. But Bourbon might be more to do with its distribution than its origin, and the existence of a modern place named Bourbon makes it look to the uninitiated like that's the source of the drink. Which it pretty routinely isn't: virtually no (if any) Bourbon comes from Bourbon.

This discussion is particularly fun, I recall, when you're a bartender being lectured by a drunk Englishman who clearly wishes he was a cowboy, and knows nothing about whiskey but thinks he wrote the book on it.

Last edited by Yorkshire Pudding; 11-05-2018 at 11:12 AM.
  #41  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:15 AM
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Interesting Thread name/poster combination, although Yorkshire Pudding does seem to have originated in northern England, possibly even in Yorkshire.
Well, I certainly did, yes...
  #42  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
Russian dressing.
Also, while we're at it French dressing does not look remotely like anything I've ever seen in France. You would think French dressing would be a basic vinaigrette of some sort, but here in the US, it's a creamy, somewhat sweet and tomato-y concoction (probably ketchup-based, but I'm not 100% sure. Looking online, it does appear a lot of French dressing recipes do include ketchup.)

Similarly, in Hungary there is a "French salad" franciasaláta, which is basically peas and carrots and often finely diced potato suspended in copious amounts of mayonnaise, with some pickles thrown in for some zesty tang. It looks like a "salad" that should have originated in Minnesota or Wisconsin or something. I don't know for certain that it doesn't have any actual French connections, but it sure as heck doesn't look like something the French would throw together. Maybe it's the mayo that makes it "French."
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Old 11-05-2018, 11:31 AM
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I've read in a couple of places that gyros are actually from NYC, not Greece.

Seems like a lot of these are named after people with place-names for names- French for French's mustard, German for German Chocolate Cake, and a guy named Caesar Cardini invented the Caesar Salad in Mexico (Tijuana, I believe).

Last edited by bump; 11-05-2018 at 11:33 AM.
  #44  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:37 AM
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Even if so, that doesn't change my point that it originated in a place named "Bourbon" and is named after the place it originated in.

Caesar Salad has nothing to do with any Roman emperor.
Funny, I somehow just found the perfect template for responding to the Caesar salad sentence:

Even if it was not named directly after a Roman emperor, that doesn't change the point that it was originated by someone named "Caesar" and is named after the person it was originated by.
  #45  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:41 AM
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The Bombay duck doesn't come especially from Bombay (Mumbai); it's found plentifully in the waters off that coast, but not there only by any means. And it isn't a duck, but a fish -- Harpodon nehereus-- most usually sold dried.
  #46  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:50 AM
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Chilean sea bass.
  #47  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:55 AM
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Darren Garrison writes: Guinea pigs aren't from Guinea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DPRK View Post
Turkeys, for that matter.
As of a few centuries ago, the English seem to have had a way of deciding that any new and exotic creature or plant which reached England; was most likely to come from either Guinea or Turkey. Rhubarb -- originally from the Far East, later obtaining plentifully in Russia, was long known in England as Turkey Rhubarb.
  #48  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:58 AM
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I've read in a couple of places that gyros are actually from NYC, not Greece.
I've also heard Chicago as the originator of at least the mass-produced "meat cone" variety. Yeah, the history doesn't seem to be that clear. From what I can find, it's certainly related to the doner kebab. Some histories say it went from Turkey to Athens and then to the US. The interesting thing I find is that the gyros here are typically lamb or a mix of lamb and beef, while in Greece, pork is very common, if not the most common. I don't think I've seen pork gyros here (other than in the similarly cooked Mexican-Lebanese tacos al pastor.)
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Old 11-05-2018, 11:59 AM
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There's a lot of very ersatz barbecue which just has an evocative American location appended to it. I know there are regional styles of barbecue, so the names ought to mean something to people who know, but the "Kansas City Sharing Platter" or "Smokin' Texas Stack" or whatever else comes out of a microwave in a UK pub chain would probably earn you a good hiding if you served them in KC, Texas or wherever the name suggests.
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Old 11-05-2018, 01:14 PM
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I admit that Rocky Mountain oysters did originate from the American West but they sure are not seafood.

Also spotted dick is a British pudding that does not contain any meat from the nether regions--spotted or otherwise.

Edit: Ok these are technically not what the OP was talking about, but it relates to to it with food names that aren't what they suggest.

Last edited by dorvann; 11-05-2018 at 01:15 PM.
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